Update on Mesotrione herbicides

By Mark Loux, Ohio State University Extension herbicide specialist

There are some changes with regard to Mesotrione herbicides that growers should be aware of in the coming year. Here is an overview.

Mesotrione herbicides

Major changes here include two new mesotrione premixes from DuPont, and some reformulating and renaming of Syngenta products. Lexar and Lumax have been subject to minor reformulating, and are now Lexar EZ and Lumax EZ. Camix, the premix of mesotrione and s-metolachlor, has been renamed Zemax. New Dupont mesotrione products include the following:

Instigate, a mixture of mesotrione and rimsulfuron, is labeled for preplant, preemergence, and early postemergence use in field corn. Instigate provides residual control or suppression of annual grass and broadleaf weeds, and has activity on emerged weeds. Application of this product alone will generally not be adequate in either a total preeemergence or preemergence followed by postemergence herbicide program. A mixture of Instigate plus an atrazine premix should have burndown activity that is similar to Lexar and Lumax, as well as similar residual weed control. This can be applied postemergence through the 2-collar corn stage, and should be mixed with COC or MSO plus UAN or AMS when used for control of emerged weeds. Interactions between this product and soil-applied insecticides can result in corn injury. Check the label for restrictions.

Realm Q, a mixture of mesotrione and rimsulfuron, is labeled for postemergence use in field corn. This product contains isoxadifen, a safener that reduces the risk of crop injury. Realm Q can be applied up to 20-inch corn and prior to the seven-collar stage. Controls small grass (less than two inches) and broadleaf weeds, but should generally be mixed with glyphosate, Liberty, or another herbicide for broad-spectrum postemergence control. Preferred adjuvant system is COC or MSO plus UAN or AMS, although NIS can be substituted for COC/MSO. Additional NIS is not needed when mixing with a loaded glyphosate product. Interactions between this product and soil-applied insecticides can result in corn injury. Check the label for restrictions.

 

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