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Blog: Kim Lemmon

An alien has landed in a local barn

There's nothing that looks "Earthly" about this goat.

By Kim Lemmon

Regular readers of my blog already realize that I’m a little crazy and also slightly superstitious. These readers also realize that my superstitions and fears both real and imagined become the most powerful each morning at the precise moment that I walk into my dark barn to feed the horses.

My fears are partly justified due to my past run-ins with skunks and raccoons in my barn; so I’m already a nervous wreck when I crack the door open to my barn and try to reach around for the distant light switch.

Additionally, my very vivid imagination seems to find that dark and spooky moment to be the ideal time to conjure up all kinds of scary images. My mind often runs wild with thoughts of a possible Bigfoot hiding in my barn among other things, and I recently met two nasty looking possums in the barn. Now I can add a new worry to my ever-growing list of real and imagined barn inhabitants — aliens.

I like nearly all kinds of livestock and babies in particular, but there is just something a little creepy about LaMancha dairy goats. These goats seem like any other dairy goat until you look at their nearly non-existent ears.

Although these goats do in fact have very small ears, the ears in no way resemble the traditional ears on most goats. The LaMancha’s ear style reminds me of an earless alien with antenna on the sides of their heads.

LaManchas are in fact commonly a very loving goat that can serve as great companions or 4-H projects, and they are wonderful producers of milk with high butterfat. Despite the facts that prove these goats are amazing producers and a pleasure to own and care for, I can’t help but think these seemingly gentle, quiet and calm animals have a hidden agenda.

A friend of mine recently added the pictured little goat to her herd. This LaMancha has the shorter “gopher” type ears, and I’m educated enough to know that the ear types on the LaManchas are just an element of their specific breed but I’ll be keeping an eye on this little darling when I visit my friend’s house.

Supposedly these goats are just overly friendly toward humans and crave human companionship, but I’ll always wonder if my friend’s goat has a secret plan to collect information from each human it meets so it can report back to the mother ship. I’ll have to come up with a polite way to keep this critter at arms length when I visit her barn.

Whether or not you believe me that an alien has landed in a barn in Delaware County, I challenge you to keep an eye on the sky and be prepared to document any possible alien invasions. Like most things in life, it is only fiction that this goat is an alien until facts prove otherwise. Keep your video cameras ready. I just set mine up in the barn for foaling season, but I may have to turn it toward the aisle in the barn just in case more wildlife or an occasional Bigfoot decides to stop by for a cat food buffet.

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Author: Kim Lemmon

Kim Lemmon has been a member of the Ohio’s Country Journal staff since 1999. She is currently the manager editor. This position requires her to position the advertisements and articles in each issue. She is also required to write a weekly blog and schedule advertisements on the website.

Kim graduated from The Ohio State University in 1999 with a major in Agricultural Communications and a minor in Equine Science. Kim and her husband, Mark, reside in Morrow County.

The Lemmons currently own a Percheron mare and several mini horses. They also breed and raise a few pygmy goats each year.

Kim has owned horses since she was a child and has been involved in many aspects of the horse industry since that time. From 2002 until 2010, Kim operated her own riding lesson program that included coaching 4-H members, adults and a college equestrian program. She is also a former 4-H horse judge.

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