The Pro Farmer Midwest Crop Tour – Day 4

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 See Day 3 Results

Not to say that the previous three days uneventful, but from what I am told what I will see today will be things that I have never seen before. Prevented plant acres will begin to show up as I head north from Iowa City and make my way to Rochester, Minnesota. And like yesterday, the fields I will see will not be what they may be in an average year because the planting date for so late due to heavy rains during prime planting windows. There are some farmers in Iowa and Minnesota that has taken the Prevented Plant route for the first time in their careers and some didn’t even know it was part of their contract until being told about the option. Truly unbelievable and I feel for these proud farmers.

Today is a short route for most of the scouts as the road from Iowa City to Rochester isn’t a long one. We are dodging rain today, which after seeing large cracks and stressed fields, I am not going to complain one bit. This will be a million dollar rain for some in this state for the soybeans. Not sure at this stage if the rain will do much for the corn crop.

8:22am

Stop #1 was in Linn County, just south of Cedar Rapids. We took a sample right off of the highway and this is what I picture Iowa corn looking like year after year. This field was very mature and all three ears were hearty. The reason this field will only yield around 157 bushels is because of a low pop. The beans were solid as well and came in with a pod count of 1102.

A good looking corn ear in Linn County, Iowa

A good looking corn ear in Linn County, Iowa

Iowa soybeans in Linn County

Iowa soybeans in Linn County

8:53am

We decided to stay in Linn County for another sample. This corn field was way more populated and the ears were coming along. That made this among the largest yielding corn at 235 bushel to the acre.

Corn field #2 in Linn County, Iowa

Corn field #2 in Linn County, Iowa

9:42am

The rain has moved through and we jumped out in the last bit of it as we headed to Delaware County. Must have been a pretty decent storm that came through just minutes before we got to these corn and soybean fields. We saw lightning in the distance this morning and when we got to the field the beans and corn were blown over a bit. Brings up that stalk quality concern around these parts. Corn is looking to hit 176 and acre and the beans were an amazing 2028 pods in a 3 x 3 square.

Blown over beans in Delaware County, Iowa

Blown over beans in Delaware County, Iowa

11:15pm

Sadly, this is our last stop of this year’s Pro Farmer Crop Tour. Our final fields were in Clayton County, Iowa. The corn has very nice ears and the population was higher than what we’ve seen for the most part. The health was not the best but if this field get a good rain and some warmer weather it may hold on to our yield guess of 202. The soybeans had a pod count of 1015. Below normal for these sections of Iowa, but within range of what everyone is seeing this year.

Decent sampling of corn from Clayton County, Iowa

Decent sampling of corn from Clayton County, Iowa

Clayton County, Iowa

Clayton County, Iowa

Our last bean field in Clayton County, Iowa

Our last bean field in Clayton County, Iowa

Clayton County, Iowa soybeans

Clayton County, Iowa soybeans

On our way in to Rochester we saw quite a bit more prevented plant in southeast Minnesota. Fields like this one came about every other mile and it is much worse if you head a bit west.

These should be Minnesota corn fields but are prevented plant acres

These should be Minnesota corn fields but are prevented plant acres

Iowa results:

Corn – 171.9 bushels per acre

Soybeans – 927.3 in a 3 feet square

Complete Iowa results from the tour

Minnesota results:

Corn – 181.1 bushels per acre

Soybeans – 869.43 in a 3 x 3 plot

Complete Minnesota results from the tour

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  1. Pingback: A crop tour from 30,000 feet | Ohio Ag Net | Ohio's Country Journal

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