Case IH launches state-of-the-art draper and corn headers

MAKES MAJOR INVESTMENTS

Case IH has announced new draper headers and corn headers that are results of a recent $60 million investment in manufacturing improvements, research and development. In addition to the new products, the venture has produced the new Combine Header Center of Excellence in Burlington, Iowa.

“We’ve invested $30 million in manufacturing improvements to create a world-class production facility, and another $30 million in research and development dedicated to header design,” says Kelly Kravig, Case IH Marketing Manager, Combines & Headers. “These new state-of-the-art headers are based on in-depth customer input and extensive competitive benchmark testing, and engineered with the latest advancements in harvesting technology.”

Kravig says the new products are backed by intense testing in the lab and on customers’ farms. “These headers have been put through the paces in all kinds of harsh, real-world harvest conditions on today’s toughest crop genetics,” Kravig adds. “They’re designed to operate at higher speeds, cover more acres in a day, produce maximum yields, minimize grain loss and provide the best grain quality. They’re bringing the Axial-Flow combine family a new level of innovation and productivity.”

The new Case IH headers also are easier to set up and maintain. “The combination of heavy-duty frames and easy maintenance helps keep producers in the field and out of the shop,” Kravig says.

DRAPER HEADS

The new 3152 and 3162 draper heads harvest more acres in less time, with superior crop feeding and less susceptibility to crop moisture. “They offer easy, in-cab deployment of the low-speed transportation system,” Kravig continues. “The 3162 flex draper also has an easy-to-use, in-cab cutterbar control option. The flexible cutterbar lets you harvest more of what you grow, because it follows ground contours more closely.”

The exclusive center-mounted knife drive – called CentraCut™ – improves header balance as the head is driven from the center. This increases performance and minimizes vibration across the cutterbar. The CentraCut design also enables narrow end dividers, which reduce crop knockdown and improves grain savings.

“Typically, larger headers have heavier, more complex drives on the header’s left side or on both sides. By using a CentraCut knife drive, we can eliminate the heavier, more complex drives in a simple efficient design,” Kravig explains.

In addition, all 3152 and 3162 frames have been designed from the ground up, with fully welded construction. “These are strong, sturdy frames that ensure durability and reliability in the field,” Kravig adds.

CORN HEADS

The new Case IH 4400 and 4200 corn heads were designed with some key customer requirements in mind, to pick cleaner, to harvest at faster speeds, to save more grain and to be easier to service. The heads include several features that allow them to pick more corn at higher ground speeds, like heavy-duty drives engineered for high-speed harvest and high-yielding corn hybrids. “These heads have high-capacity gathering chains to pull in large crop volumes, and matched capacity stalk roll to gathering chain speeds for superior feeding.

“They also have larger stalk rolls that increase stalk processing, and longer stalk roll knives that give you a wider operating range,” Kravig notes. And they’re built with patented corn saver louvers that maximize grain savings.

“We also made them easier to service and maintain so you can spend more time harvesting,” Kravig says. “New poly dividers are more durable, provide quick, easy access for cleaning, they include gas struts for easier access and flip-up dividers fast conversion from field to road.”

Combine Header Center of Excellence

Kravig says the new, upgraded facility in Burlington, Iowa also represents a great opportunity for this company to showcase its cutting edge manufacturing and demonstrate its dedication to the header business.

“This new facility won’t just serve as the heart of our header business in North America,” explained Kravig. “Almost a quarter of what we’ll be producing in Iowa will ship out overseas for sale all over the world.”

For more information, visit www.caseih.com.

 

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