Buck wins a Case IH Farmall Tractor

Maintaining its support for young producers who show leadership in the agriculture industry, Case IH awarded nine new Farmall® tractors to the runners-up of the 2014 American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF) Young Farmers & Ranchers awards. One of those tractors, a Farmall 45A,will go to Dr. Emily Buck and her husband, John, of New Bloomington, Ohio, for being a finalist for the Excellence in Agriculture award.

The winners, announced at the AFBF 95th Annual Meeting Jan. 12-15 in San Antonio, Texas, were selected for having an extensive agriculture background, possessing leadership skills and being advocates for their agricultural values.

“Case IH is proud to support these outstanding individuals as they continue to pursue a future in the agriculture industry,” says Zach Hetterick, Case IH Livestock Marketing Manager. “At Case IH, we strive to provide the tools and resources to help young producers develop a strong foundation for their future.”

The Bucks currently operate the farm that was started by John’s grandparents. They farm  700 acres in Marion County, Ohio, and  another 300 acres in Akron of corn, wheat and soybeans. The Bucks are very environmentally conscious and have been nationally recognized for their conservation work and extensively use no-till.  Emily also has restarted her sheep herd and says that she hopes to grow that part of the operation.

“I really like that Farm Bureau is about building leadership and agricultural public policies,” says Emily. “It has helped me to make an impact in the world of agriculture and grow as a professional as well.”

The Bucks ordered their Case IH Farmall 45A from local Case IH dealer Evolution Ag and can’t wait to get the tractor. They plan to use it for cleaning out barns, spreading manure and pulling wagons for hay rides during educational tours that they host at their farm.

“It is so nice to know that a large company like Case IH is supporting young farmers and helping them grow,” says Emily. “It really shows their dedication to the future of agriculture.”

Emily first got involved with Farm Bureau in Florida while she was in graduate school. When she moved to Ohio, she remained involved and currently serves as county board secretary. She has attended the Young Ag Professionals leadership conference in Ohio and helped with many county events, including the county fair and the Harvest Hustle 5K.

Outside of Farm Bureau, Emily is an associate professor of agricultural communication at The Ohio State University and participates in many area cancer fundraisers, and loves being on the farm with their daughter, Harlie.

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