Winter tough on Ohio pheasant populations

According to Pheasants Forever, two factors are of critical importance to maintaining healthy pheasant populations: weather and available habitat. While these elements affect pheasants year-round, they’re highlighted annually as the harshest season comes to an end and pheasants begin their next reproductive cycle. A tough winter can certainly result in bird mortality, but the real key is getting healthy and strong hens into spring nesting season. Healthy hens lead to larger clutches of eggs, which adds up to more chicks headed toward autumn.

Generally speaking, the winter of 2013-2014 was toughest on pheasants and pheasant habitat in the Great Lakes region where heavy snows and bitter cold made for a long winter that continues despite the calendar turning to spring. Meanwhile, the Dakotas experienced a relatively mild winter, while the lack of snow accumulation across parts of the Great Plains has biologists concerned, the moisture being needed to restore habitat conditions following three years of drought.

According the field reports from Pheasants Forever, Ohio pheasants took a hit this winter, which was a severe period featuring snowfall, long durations of snow cover and extreme cold.

“Ohio pheasants undoubtedly struggled to find sufficient food and cover during this severe winter,” said Mark Wiley, wildlife biologist with the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Wildlife. “A typical Ohio winter has intermittent snow cover, which provides pheasants with ample opportunity to forage for waste grain and other seeds on the bare ground. This year, persistent snow cover likely forced pheasants to venture further from shelter in search of food, thereby increasing the risk of predation.” Wiley notes there is a habitat bright spot. More than 10,000 acres in the Ohio Pheasant State Acres For Wildlife Enhancement (SAFE) program will be available as a continuous signup practice as part of the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), acres that will only be available within the primary pheasant range in the state.

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4 thoughts on “Winter tough on Ohio pheasant populations”

  1. What is hard on Ohio pheasant populations is when you turn half the state into corn and soybean fields.

  2. What is tough on Ohio pheasant populations is turning half the state into corn and soybean fields.

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