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Springdale, Ohio Photo credit: Movoto.com

Is your hometown the most boring place in Ohio?

I would have to imagine that many readers of my blog and visitors of OhioAgNet.com come from pretty ordinary towns, and I would also say that the vast majority of those readers and visitors would say that coming from an ordinary town is not such a bad thing.

When it comes to a recently published survey about the 10 Most Boring Places in Ohio, my hometown of Johnstown, Ohio didn’t make it on the list but, in a weird way, I was kind of hoping it would.

The list was put together by real estate site movoto.com and here is how the towns were compiled.

First, they compiled a list of the most populated places in the state over 10,000 people, to save some of the smaller places from themselves. Then they used sources including the U.S. Census and business listings to gather what they decided were important criteria. Those criteria were:

  • Nightlife per capita (bars, clubs, comedy, etc.)
  • Live music venues per capita
  • Active life options per capita (parks, outdoor activities, etc.)
  • Arts and Entertainment per capita (movie theaters, festivals, galleries, theaters, etc.)
  • Fast Food restaurants per capita (the fewer the better)
  • Percentage of restaurants that are not fast food (the higher the better)
  • Percentage of young residents ages 18 to 34 (the higher the better)
  • Population density (the higher the better)

Some cities didn’t have all of that data, so if they’re omitted from the list, that could be why. Then they ranked each place in each category from one to 173, with one being the least boring. They averaged each location’s scores into one Big Deal Score, and the place with the score closest to 173 became out absolute most boring location. Unfortunately for New Franklin, Ohio, they took that most dubious honor.

You know what’s great about a so-called “boring” town? In a boring town, you can be a kid for just a little bit longer. I would go out and “find trouble” and my parents didn’t have to  worry about what I was up to because I found my trouble in the woods, in a field or by the pond.

I knew, and still do for the most part, almost everyone else in my hometown. I know the cashier at the grocery store, the guy that owns the car wash and a few generations of operators of the hardware store.

I can stop in my old high-school on a whim and talk to my former teachers and swing by an old friend’s place to just say hello for a minute or two without a formal invitation.

Many of us may not have too many exciting things happening where we came from, but on the plus side, things don’t really change that much and we can always find our way back.

Is your hometown in the top 10 when it comes to being a boring place? Find out here.

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