Project enrollment for 4-H and FFA members and showing animals at the Ohio State Fair

Heading into the 2016 show season, exhibitors need to be aware that in order to be eligible to show livestock at the Ohio State Fair, they need to be enrolled in the project regardless of whether the project is offered at their county fair.

“For example, they can’t show a breeding gilt at the State Fair if they are not enrolled in a breeding gilt project in their county, regardless if that county offers breeding gilt classes at the county fair. You can show at the State Fair if your county does not offer a certain class, but you have to be enrolled in the project,” said Lucinda Miller, Extension Specialist for the 4-H Youth Development Companion and Small Animal Programs.  “We have had some questions already this year about youth wanting to take market heifer projects as breeding heifers if they don’t work out as a market project or vice versa. Youth cannot enroll the same animal in a breeding and a market project.”

Here are more details in an overview of the rules provided by Miller.

4-H members must be enrolled in their county in the project in which they enter to show at the Ohio State Fair Junior Livestock Shows (including poultry, rabbits, and dogs), regardless of whether that project is offered for county exhibition. Here are examples.

1   To show in a gilt class at the Ohio State Fair, youth must be enrolled in project 140 Swine Breeding Project and Record Book.

2   To show a dairy feeder at the Ohio State Fair, youth must be enrolled in project 117DF Dairy Beef Feeder (Market);

3   To show breeding poultry (chickens) at the Ohio State Fair, 4-H members must be enrolled in project 150CE, Exhibition Chickens; to show breeding poultry (ducks), they must be enrolled in project 150DE, Exhibition Ducks, and so forth.

4    To show a dog in agility at the Ohio State Fair, 4-H members must be enrolled in project 201P, Performance; to show the same dog in obedience, project 201O, Obedience, etc.

FFA members must enter to show at the Ohio State Fair the same animal project they are taking through their Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE). Here are examples:

1   To show a market lamb at the Ohio State Fair, FFA members must be taking market lambs as one of their Supervised Agricultural Experiences.

2   To show a beef breeding heifer at the Ohio State Fair, FFA members must be taking breeding beef as one of their Supervised Agricultural Experiences.

The same animal cannot be enrolled in two projects in the county (with the exception of dog projects and 4-H PetPALS), with the youth planning to enter one or the other project at the Ohio State Fair. Decisions must be made by project enrollment deadline or county’s animal identification deadline (whichever comes first). Here are examples:

1   A youth is not permitted to enroll the same beef animal in a breeding project (117B Beef Breeding) and in a market project (117M Market Beef).

2   A youth is not permitted to enroll the same rabbit in a pet rabbit project (Pet Rabbit Project and Record Book 227) and in a breeding rabbit project (Breeding Rabbit Project and Record Book 225). She/he must choose which project in which to enroll that animal by county deadlines for that species.

3   There is an exception dog projects. Youth may enroll the same dog in multiple dog projects such as in You and Your Dog (201D); Obedience (201O); Performance (201P) and Showmanship (201S) provided that dog can perform the required exercises of each project at the Ohio State Fair.

4   Exception: 4-H PetPALS: Youth may enroll in a pet rabbit project (225) and 4-H PetPALS (230), or 150CE Exhibition Chickens and 230 4-H PetPALS, etc. with the same animal.

 

4-H and FFA membership

Ohio 4-H members are sometimes also FFA members, often within the same county or in an adjacent county. These members especially need to keep in mind the 4-H policy about 4-H projects being separate from school projects. To keep work in both organizations clearly separate, 4-H members are advised to take different species in the two organizations or, at the very least, to take market animals in one and breeding animals in the other. The idea is to refrain from exhibiting the same project more than once. Exhibitors should check their junior fair exhibition rules about exhibiting both 4-H and FFA projects and animals.

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