Glen Newcomer, June 12

To say that we were busy the last two weeks would be an understatement. There was an unprecedented amount of replanting that occurred here in northwest Ohio this past week. It is not just in Ohio, it’s throughout the Midwest. It is widespread throughout Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, and Iowa.

Everything planted in mid-May was crusted in and a very high percentage of it had to be replanted. On our farm we ended up replanting 20% of our corn and 60% of our soybeans. I’ve never experienced anything like that in my entire farming career. It was very prevalent throughout the whole northwest corner of Ohio. It didn’t matter what the soil type was, or how it was planted, the crusted ground did not allow for emergence in some fields. The seed germinated but it simply could not push through the crust that developed. In counties directly south, it was very common for people making their third attempt at planting. Conditions were such that it was pretty obvious that the crop was not going to emerge and we took immediate action to get the crop established. Soil crusting was the predominant issue in our area, yet very little disease was seen in the emerging plants.

As far as insect pressure, there was a little bit of army worm damage in the counties south of us but we didn’t see any in our immediate area. We had many fields where it was a simple decision that the entire field had to be replanted. We addressed those fields first. We also spotted in some fields to add to the stand. I am a firm believer that you have to have a population in place to achieve a desirable yield. We don’t mess around when it comes to replanting. It is too early in the game to be less than satisfied with the emerged stand population. We finished replanting on June 8. It went in great and from what I scouted today, it all appears to have germinated and most of it has emerged as a result of the warm soil temperatures.

Many people are sidedressing corn but we stopped because of the dry conditions. With showers in the forecast, we will be at it again next week.

Frustration with the weather is one of the things we have to deal with quite often in agriculture. In the middle of May when we finished planting I was on top of the world thinking we had hit a home run. As it turned out we definitely hit a foul ball, but we will step back up to the plate, persevere and overcome.

 

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