Glen Newcomer, June 26

We were very fortunate this past week. We finally received a measurable amount of rain. We had good coverage over all of our farms and it is really going to make a difference. Prior to that the crop was reaching a critical stage of plant development when it was dry. Now with the rain, I believe the crop can get back on track. Rainfall amounts on our farms ranged from an inch to 1.4 inches so it was a good general rain last week. We missed several rains prior to that and it was getting bad.

As far as plant stress we really didn’t see the corn rolling, but the plants were just shutting down and they virtually stopped growing. There was no vegetative growth taking place above the ground and the roots were just trying to sustain the plant to keep it alive.

Clearly there was a benefit to replanting the affected corn acres when we did. We did not have a good stand established before that. Even though the corn is behind in growth, the uniformity of the stand should ultimately perform better than the thin stand we would have if we had not replanted.

This last week we finished applying anhydrous. We ran some prescriptions of variable rate anhydrous. We used DuPont Encirca services for that decision.

The management zones that were developed were a combination of past yield history and soil types along with soil tests prior to planting to establish nitrate levels in the soil. The prescriptions that were developed had a wide range of applications. We defined high and low rates of nitrogen for the prescriptions. We will track these fields through harvest to see if we have a favorable response to the treatment.

We also applied FeXapan to our Roundup Ready2 Xtend soybeans last week. This is new technology for us on our farm.  We are excited about the possibilities this technology brings for additional options in controlling difficult broadleaf weeds. By following the label, we have no concerns at this time about spray drift or volatilization of the dicamba. We’ll be watching and monitoring this very closely in the coming weeks.

I’m always interested in trying new technologies on our farm. It’s one way to stay one step ahead in the game of farming. Ultimately we’re looking for a competitive advantage from bottom line performance.

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