2017 Ohio Crop Tour I-75 Day 2

 

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I-75 Day 1 I-71 Day 1

Montgomery County corn summary: This was a nice corn field. It had good plant health.  The stand count was 31,000 with good stalks and very uniform spacing.  There was GLS, anthracnose and common rust below the ear leaf. There was no insect pressure. The pollination was very good and the ears were filled to the end with a yield of 191 bushels.

Montgomery Co. corn

Montgomery Co. corn

Montgomery Co. corn

Montgomery Co. corn

Montgomery County soybean summary: The beans were 33 inches tall in this nice looking field. It was about four inches to the first node. There was just a little bit of sudden death syndrome, but other than that there were no diseases or bugs. They were late planted and could definitely use another rain or two.

Montgomery Co. beans

Montgomery Co. beans

Greene County corn summary: There was some GLS and some rust above the ear. There was anthracnose three leaves up. There was no insect pressure. The roots and stalks looked good. We found a harvest population of 30,500.  It was planted on May 28. We found a yield of 177 bushels. It has a ways to go with the late planting. There is a little tip-back.

Greene Co. corn

Greene Co. corn

Greene Co. corn

Greene Co. corn

Greene county bean summary: Canopy height was 32 to 36 inches and the first node was at four inches. We saw a little frogeye and brown spot, but not bad. There was no insect pressure and some small pods. Today’s rain will really help. These were planted at 155,000 on May 27.

Greene Co. beans

Greene Co. beans

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 Warren County corn summary: The corn is very tall. It was planted June 1 and 32,500 seeds were dropped. Today’s stand count was 26,000. The potential yield is 164. The biggest thing hurting the field is severe anthracnose leaf blight. It is the worst we have seen. We also found corn earworms feeding on the kernels. The anthracnose is a real issue. If the disease progresses the yield will go down.

We found earworm working on the kernels.

We found earworm working on the kernels.

The anthracnose in this field was severe.

The anthracnose in this field was severe.

Warren County soybean summary: The canopy was a good 50 inches tall and they were thick. They were about 10 inches to the first node and they were starting to lodge. They planted about 170,000 on May 16. They were podded up pretty well for as tall as they were and they were still adding pods. Rains today will really help. There was no real disease pressure or insects.

The beans were the tallest we've seen in Warren County.

The beans were the tallest we’ve seen in Warren County.

The beans across the drive are double-crops, some of the nicest we've seen.

The beans across the drive are double-crops, some of the nicest we’ve seen.

Butler County corn summary: There was some anthracnose and some N deficiency up three leaves. There was no insect pressure. It was planted on April 20 with a population 34,000 and a current stalk count of 32,000. The yield looks to be about 182 bushels. This is as far along as any corn we’ve come across.

Butler Co.Corn

Butler Co.Corn

Butler Co. corn

Butler Co. corn

Butler County soybean summary: These were in 15-inch rows with a drop of 155,000 on May 26. These are tall beans at 46 inches and the first node was at six inches. They were healthy with some brown spot and sudden death and a little frogeye. There was some Japanese beetle feeding. There was good pod set from top to bottom. With their height, some are already starting to go down. Overall this is a good field of beans.

Butler Co. beans

Butler Co. beans

Butler Co. beans

Butler Co. beans

Preble County corn summary: This was planted April 18 with a seeding rate from 32,000 to 38,000 and the harvest population was 25,000, which hurt the final yield estimate. It was tall corn with good stalks and good roots. There were large gaps in some rows. Above the ear leaf we found common rust, GLS and NCLB. There was anthracnose leaf blight two to three leaves up. Fungicide did hold off he rust. There was some N deficiency. The yield is 176 bushels.

PrebleCorn

Preble Co. corn

PrebleCorn2

Preble Co. corn

Preble County soybean summary: There is a 36-inch canopy with the first node about six inches up. There was no insect pressure and disease pressure was very limited. They were planted on May with a 160,000 and they were well podded with nice beans in the pods. These were good to excellent, closer to excellent.

Preble Co. beans

Preble Co. beans

Preble Co. beans

Preble Co. beans

Darke County corn summary: This was planted April 18 with minimal disease and a little green snap. There was no insect pressure and ear fill was good. There was a population of 33,000 and a yield around 175 bushels.

Darke Co. corn

Darke Co. corn

Darke Co. corn

Darke Co. corn

 

Darke County soybeans summary: This was a really nice field planted May 18 in 15-inch rows and a 155,000 population. Weed control was excellent and the plants are very healthy with nodes close together and podded heavily from the ground up. They still need rain to help them form. There was minimal disease and a 36-inch tall canopy. There was a fungicide application that kept the diseases in check. The overall rating is excellent in some of the best beans we’ve seen. The standability was excellent as well.

Darke Co. beans

Darke Co. beans

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Darke Co. beans

Mercer County corn summary: This field was replanted and the population was at 33,000. We saw a lot of issues in this field: GLS, common rust, anthracnose, silk feeding, and varying degrees of pollination with the first crop and the replanted crop. We found a155-bushel corn yield here and there are many gaps and spindly stalks. We saw fall armyworm working from the tip down the ear. We also found zipper ears missing two or three rows. There was maybe 7% or 8% of ears not developing correctly due to corn smut and that will also be a factor in the yield.

We found fall armyworm in the Mercer County corn

We found fall armyworm in the Mercer County corn

There was a fair amount of smut and some fall armyworm damage in the corn,

There was a fair amount of smut and some fall armyworm damage in the corn,

 

Mercer County soybean summary: Canopy height was 28 inches and the first node height four inches. There was a fair amount of brown spot, some frogeye, and around 20% of the plants had a leaf or two with chemical injury. There were many small pods with beans just starting to form that would benefit from a rain. This is a fair to poor field.

There was some frogeye in the beans in Mercer County.

There was some frogeye in the beans in Mercer County.

We found chemical injury in Mercer County.

We found chemical injury in Mercer County.

 

Auglaize County corn summary: There was a 32,000 count for this April planted field. There was some common rust and a little anthracnose. There were some suckered stalks and the girthy ears were well filled. We found a 215-bushel yield here.

Auglaize Co. corn

Auglaize Co. corn

Auglaize Co. corn

Auglaize Co. corn

 

Auglaize County soybean summary: This was a nice field with drilled 7.5-inch rows. The pop was 180,000 and they were standing well. They were planted April 27. This is a very healthy field at 38 inches tall with a first node five inches from the ground. There is some brown spot, SDS and the first frogeye we’ve found. Fungicide and insecticide have been applied. There was some Japanese beetle feeding, good root development and nice pod set from bottom to top. The field was uniform with excellent yield potential.

Auglaize Co. beans

Auglaize Co. beans

Auglaize Co. beans

Auglaize Co. beans

 

Miami County corn summary: This is a very healthy field with good height and a population of 32,500. We saw a little GLS and common rust. We found anthracnose leaf blight that was very evident and there is some potential for stalk rot this fall. We saw some green snap here too. We found a yield of 201 in this nice field of corn.

Miami Co. corn

Miami Co. corn

Miami Co. corn

Miami Co. corn

Miami County soybean summary: The soybean canopy was 37 inches and six inches to the first node. Disease pressure was light and there was a little Japanese beetle feeding. They were planted April 18 with a population of 165,000. They look good for 2.8 beans with good to excellent yield potential.

Miami Co. beans

Miami Co. beans

Miami Co. beans

Miami Co. beans

Shelby County corn summary: There was a population of 34,000 with some green snap problems, maybe 5% to 8% damage. Other than that, the corn was healthy and green with no N deficiency. No diseases or insects and ear fill was excellent. We found a yield of 200 bushels, but considering the green snap, a yield of 185 is probably more accurate.

Shelby Co. corn

Shelby Co. corn

Shelby Co. corn

Shelby Co. corn

Shelby County soybean summary: It is very impressive when you look at the field. They are tall and green but they aren’t going to yield. They are 42 inches tall but the first pod above the ground is 9 inches. There are Japanese beetles actively feeding and there are not good clusters of pods and nodes are far apart. Yield potential is just fair in this field that looks really good from the road.

Shelby Co. beans

Shelby Co. beans

Shelbybeans2

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  1. Pingback: 2017 Ohio Crop Tour I-71 Day 2 | Ohio Ag Net | Ohio's Country Journal

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