2017 Ohio Crop Tour I-75 Day 1

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How are yield calculations made on the Ohio Crop Tour? 

Van Wert corn summary: The gaps were the worst we’ve seen due to the early saturated conditions. It was first planted May 22 and then replanted two weeks later. There was a population of 21,000 due to the gaps. There was some gray leaf spot, NCLB and common rust. There was a half-inch to an inch of tip-back. The yield is 135 bushels and it could use some rain. The heavy rains this spring took a toll on this field. There was N deficiency. This is a poor to fair field.

Wet conditions led to significant holes in this Van Wert Co. corn.

Wet conditions led to significant holes in this Van Wert Co. corn.

Van Wert Co. corn

Van Wert Co. corn

Van Wert soybean summary: The height was 26 inches and the first node was four inches. There were a few Japanese beetles and some brown spot. There were many plants still blooming and pods have a long way to go. They need some rain. They were planted in late May with a population of 170,000. Wet conditions really reduced the stand early in the season. Yield potential is fair with some rain.

VanWert Co. beans

VanWert Co. beans

VanWertbeans2

 Paulding County corn summary: The corn was very good with no insect or disease pressure. There was very little tip-back and 180-bushel yield. The population was 28,000. The field was planted in late April and one of the few in the area that did not need replanting due to excessive rains. Now it is getting dry. This is a well above average field for the area.

Paulding Co. corn

Paulding Co. corn

Paulding Co. corn

Paulding Co. corn

Paulding County soybean summary: There was very good weed control in these short beans. The beans are 27 inches tall. There had been 40 inches of rain from the late May planting date. There is poor root development due to wet conditions. These were densely podded with close nodes. There was a little grasshopper feeding and a little brown spot and sudden death starting. The plants need water in the fair soybean field. There were 200,000 seeds dropped in this conventional field.

Paulding Co. beans

Paulding Co. beans

Paulding Co. beans

Paulding Co. beans

Defiance County corn summary: In a field that looked better than some of the surrounding fields, we noticed corn that was stressed out and in need of water. The disease pressure from gray leaf spot and common rust and northern corn leaf blight was evident. There was no insect pressure and very little tip-back. We found a yield of 154. The population was 26,000 in this good field considering the conditions. The plant is likely cannibalizing the stalk and it could be a problem at harvest. There is also moderate N deficiency.

Defiance Co. corn

Defiance Co. corn

Defiance Co. corn

Defiance Co. corn

Defiance County soybean summary: We had a canopy height of 38 with a first node at six inches. There was a little brown spot and some Japanese beetle feeding. Rain would really add bushels to these beans. This had an overall rating of good. 

DefianceBeans

 

DSC_9885

Williams County corn summary: The yield was 212 in this excellent corn. It was planted May 14. There was good ear fill and little insect pressure but it needs a drink. Some rain would really help fill out the kernels. The population was at 32,500.

Williams Co. corn

Williams Co. corn

Wiiliams Co. corn

Wiiliams Co. corn

Williams County soybean summary: The field was planted in early June and seeded variable rate with 7.5 inch spacing. There are very dry conditions but the plants are very healthy. The canopy height is 32 inches and it was 5.5 inches to the first node. There was a little Septoria brown spot and no insects found. Pod set was close together and it is still flowering with good roots and nodulation with good condition.

Williams Co. beans

Williams Co. beans

Williams Co. beans

Williams Co. beans

Fulton County corn summary: Above the ear is healthy but from the ear down the plants seems stressed due to lack of moisture and poor nutrient uptake. We feel that the plant is cannibalizing the stalk now. There is a 34,000 population and a yield of 187 bushels, but this field is in extreme need of water and if there is no rain that yield will go south quickly. No insect pressure.  

Fulton Co. corn

Fulton Co. corn

Fulton Co. corn

Fulton Co. corn

Fulton County soybeans summary: They are around 34 inches tall and about six inches to the first node. Some pods are just forming and the plants are still blooming, they need some rain. There is no disease or insect pressure and they hadn’t been sprayed. These were the nicest spaced rows we have seen. These have good potential with another rain.

Fulton Co. beans

Fulton Co. beans

Fulton Co. beans

Fulton Co. beans

Henry County corn summary: The population was about 26,500. The corn is still silking and showing some N deficiency. There is a little NCLB. The corn was not far enough along to get a good yield estimate. It has good yield potential if everything cooperates but it has a long way to go. If the frost stays away this fall and they get some rains, yields could be 175 or so but if not, it could be more like 145.

Henry Co. corn

Henry Co. corn

Henry Co. corn

Henry Co. corn

 

Henry County soybean summary: The soybeans had some variability due to where the water was. These plants are still blooming. The canopy height is around 34 inches tall. The first node is six inches high. There was little to no insect pressure. Weed control is excellent. There is a little sudden death syndrome starting to show up but there is very low disease pressure. This field really needs rains to finish. It was no-tilled into rye.

Henry Co. soybeans

Henry Co. soybeans

Henry Co. soybeans

Henry Co. soybeans

Wood County corn summary: This field has very healthy plants and was planted April 26 the first time and then 60 acres was replanted on May 27. We were in the first planted part but there were gaps in the row with a population from 23,000 to 30,000 plants per acre. There was GLS below the ear leaf. Above the ear leaf there was less than 10%. There was second generation corn borer. They applied fungicide and insecticide. There was very little tip-back with nice ears and deep kernals for a yield of 201 bushels per acre, but there are gaps that will drop that yield.

Wood Co. corn

Wood Co. corn

 

Wood County soybean summary: Around 39 inches tall with a first node at around 5 inches. There was a little Septoria but fungicide controlled it. There was a hole by the road from wet conditions. There were numerous four-bean pods with a mid-May planting date in one of the best bean fields we’ve seen.

Wood Co. beans

Wood Co. beans

Wood Co. beans

Wood Co. beans

Hancock County corn summary: There was a population of 32,000 with a yield of 171 bushels. There was some rust and a little gray leaf spot. Some tip-back, about an inch. It was planted on April 25 and a pretty good looking field, starting to dent.

Hancock Corn

Hancock Corn

Hancock Co. corn

Hancock Co. corn

Hancock County soybean summary: This was a very nice field of beans with no weed pressure and very healthy plants. It was planted May 13 and they dropped 140,000 in 15-inch rows. Canopy height was 36 inches tall and started podding four inches off the ground. There was some brown spot and some Japanese beetle feeding with very nice pod set from bottom to top and a good tap root. There were 80% three-bean and 20% four-bean pods. This is a 60-bushel plus field with some rainfall. 

Hancock Co. beans

Hancock Co. beans

Hancock Co. beans

Hancock Co. beans

Putnam County Corn summary: This field was planted May 18 with very healthy plants. There was very little disease and fungicide was applied. No insect pressure and very little tip-back with some N deficiency and some gaps in rows from excessive rainfall this spring. The estimated yield is 154 bushels per acre with ears filled all the way. The population was 27,000.

Putnam Co

Putnam Co

Putnam Co. Corn

Putnam Co. Corn

Putnam Co. Soybean summary: Canopy height was around 33 inches with a four-inch first node height. There were no insects or diseases and there was good to excellent yield potential. It was planted on April 28 and there was a nice field of double-crops across the road.

Putnam Co. beans

Putnam Co. beans

Putnam Co. beans

Putnam Co. beans

 

Hardin County Corn Summary: There were early saturated soils here. The plants were fairly healthy though there was some disease present with gray leaf spot above the ear and a little northern corn leaf blight and common rust. There was some ear damage from birds and there was a little corn borer damage in the conventional corn. There was definitely some moderate to severe nitrogen deficiency. There was some tip back. Yield looks to be around 168 bushels.

Hardin Co. corn

Hardin Co. corn

HardinCorn2

Hardin County Soybean Summary: Minimal brown spot with a canopy around 27 inches but uneven height. The first node height was six inches. Insect pressure was light. There were some two-bean pods and around 30-pods per plant. Good yield potential.  There were cracks in the ground 1.5 inches wide showing it was dry after a wet start.

Hardin Co. beans

Hardin Co. beans

Hardin Co. beans

Hardin Co. beans

 

Allen County Corn Summary: We saw some nitrogen deficiency all the way up to the ear on the leaves. Light disease pressure with just a little bit of common rust. Insect pressure was light to moderate with some corn borer feeding below the ear. There was some moderate tip-back. The population was around 28,500 and the yield is 151 bushels.

Allen Co. corn

Allen Co. corn

Allen. Co. corn

Allen. Co. corn

Allen County Soybean summary: Podded nice top to bottom with a 32-inch high canopy. The first node height was 10 inches off the ground.  There were some Japanese beetles with around 20% leaf feeding and minimal brown spot. There were quite a few four-bean pods and good nodulation with strong yield potential.

Allen Co. Beans

Allen Co. Beans

Allen Co. beans

Allen Co. beans

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6 thoughts on “2017 Ohio Crop Tour I-75 Day 1”

  1. What happened to Lucas County…..no report…..don’t we count

  2. What happened to Lucas County, no report, don’t we count ?

    • Sorry, we didn’t make it to Lucas County. You definitely count, but we just can’t get to every county. Thanks for following our Crop Tour!

  3. Pingback: 2017 Ohio Crop Tour I-75 Day 2 | Ohio Ag Net | Ohio's Country Journal

  4. Pingback: 2017 Ohio Crop Tour I-71 Day 2 | Ohio Ag Net | Ohio's Country Journal

  5. Pingback: 2017 I-75/I-71 Ohio Crop Tour summary | Ohio Ag Net | Ohio's Country Journal

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