Glen Newcomer, Sept. 11

I still believe additional rain will benefit the soybean crop. The same holds true for the corn crop. We are, however, getting exceptionally dry. We had hit and miss rains last week but not enough to have an impact or make much of a yield difference. Lack of rain and an early frost are our two greatest concerns at this time.

Most of the corn is still not black layered or fully matured. We need at least 100 growing degree units on the April-planted corn and probably an additional 300 or 350 growing degree units for the replant corn that was planted in early June. We absolutely do not want to have any type of frost on any of our crops for quite some time. Based on recent weather, we are only accumulating 10 to 15 growing degree units per day. At that rate we need several weeks of above normal temperatures before we can handle a frost in this part of the state. We have noticed some premature death in corn as a result of the dry weather, which could create standability or stalk issues in this crop.

We’ll probably be shelling corn before we cut soybeans because of those issues. As a result of multiple stresses on this crop, I believe the overall corn plant health has been compromised.

We have not found high populations of soybean aphids that other areas have experienced. Soybean leaf diseases are minimal. Some farmers are seeing sudden death syndrome and white mold in their soybeans. Looking forward, soybeans are just totally dependent on the amount of rain we receive between now and full maturity. With the cooler temperatures, it has definitely slowed down the progression of harvest. I do not anticipate harvesting any soybeans in September this year. We may shell some corn before we start on soybeans.

Some of the initial tonnage reports from silage being made may indicate that the corn crop is better than we anticipate. Let’s hope so. This year all crops are going to be quite variable and unpredictable in yield.

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