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For love of print

By Dan Armitage, host of Buckeye Sportsman, Ohio’s longest running outdoor radio show

I welcomed the editor of Outdoor Life magazine, Anthony Licata, on my radio show recently and we had a frank discussion about the role of print in today’s outdoors media. My favorite of the former Big Three outdoor publications that included Sports Afield and Field & Steam recently went quarterly, meaning subscribers now receive their copies of Outdoor Life four times each year instead of monthly. When I inquired why, the main reason was reader interest, said Licata. He revealed that readers were asking for more narratives, or “Me and Joe”-type articles that tell a tale and take longer (read that: more space) to tell. The new issues are 100-plus pages long, and will, he said, contain plenty of such content.

“For example,” he said, “an angler who wants to learn how to tie a Clouser fly now goes to You Tube to learn how” and doesn’t rely on magazines to offer such content. “We had to change with the times,” he added. “And we think we’ve taken the right path.”

I hope Licata is right. I like nothing more than sitting down in my favorite easy chair with a magazine or newspaper in my lap for a relaxing read. That’s especially true of outdoor magazines.

As an aside, my first hope of ever becoming an outdoor writer came from the pages of Outdoor Life the summer of 1966 when, at age 12, I discovered in its hallowed pages an article on fishing in Ohio titled “My Panfish on Light Tackle Kick.” When I noted it had been penned by a writer named Erwin Bauer who lived one suburban neighborhood over from mine, it was a watershed moment for me. I realized I didn’t have to live in Montana, Maine or Florida to make a living writing about the outdoors. If he could do it, so could I.

One of the benefits of being married to a librarian, my wife last Christmas presented me with an original copy of that Outdoor Life issue, a gift I cherish. I didn’t ask if she located it in the classified section of a print magazine or online.

 

419er Archers Celebrate Range

A new archery range is now open at Maumee Bay State Park, located at 1400 State Park Road, Oregon. The entrance to the range is just past the park office on Park Road 1. On the range, archers will find seven shooting lanes with a combination of static bag targets and 3D targets. Use of the range is free, and the hours of operation are sunrise to sunset, seven days a week. Shooters are reminded that only field points are allowed, no broadheads.

The construction of the range was completed through a partnership between the ODNR Division of Wildlife and the ODNR Division of Parks and Watercraft and was funded by Ohio hunting and fishing license sales and monies generated by the Pittman-Robertson Act. The Pittman-Robertson Act was enacted by President Franklin Roosevelt in 1937 and puts an 11% federal excise tax on sporting arms, handguns, ammunitions, bows and arrows.

For more information on Ohio’s shooting sports opportunities, or to find a range near you, visit wildohio.gov. Click on the “Hunting, Trapping and Shooting Sports” tab, then click on “Shooting Ranges.”

 

Beaver and otter trapping drawings held

Ohio trappers are invited to participate in special drawings Saturday, Oct. 13, for public land beaver and river otter trapping opportunities. A list of public land trapping opportunities available at the lottery is posted at wildohio.gov under “Controlled Hunting and Trapping Events.” Interested trappers will be required to come to one of the five wildlife district offices, where registration begins at 11 a.m. and the drawing to begin at 12 p.m. For more detailed information, visit http://wildlife.ohiodnr.gov/stay-informed/news-announcements/post/public-drawings-offered-for-beaver-and-otter-trapping-opportunities-on-state-owned-or-managed-properties-2018

 

Fall turkey hunting counties increase

Thanks to three counties being added — Erie, Hancock and Lucas — Ohio hunters can pursue wild turkeys in a record 70 counties this autumn during a six-week season that opens Saturday, Oct. 13 through Sunday, Nov. 25. Gobblers, poults and hens are legal game during the fall wild turkey season, but only one turkey of either sex may be harvested during the season. A valid Ohio hunting license and a fall turkey hunting permit are required to participate in the autumn opportunity that is open from 30 minutes before sunrise until sunset daily. Shotguns using shot, as well as crossbows and longbows, are permitted, and turkeys must be checked by 11:30 p.m. on the day the bird is harvested.

Hunters must make their own game tag to attach to a turkey, and can use any material (cardboard, plastic, paper, etc.) as long as it contains the hunter’s name, date, time, and county of the kill. Go to the Turkey Hunting Resources page at wildohio.gov for more information on changes to the game check process.

Also, all successful hunters must report their turkey harvest using the automated game-check system, which is available online and by phone seven days a week, including holidays. Hunters with a turkey permit have three options to complete the game check:

  • Online at ohiogamecheck.com;
  • Call 877-TAG-ITOH (824-4864); or
  • Visit a license agent. A list of agents can be found at wildohio.gov or by calling 800-WILDLIFE (945-3543).

Landowners exempt from purchasing a turkey permit, and others not required to purchase a turkey permit, cannot use the 877-TAG-ITOH option. Landowners and others not required to obtain a permit have the following game-check options:

  • Online at ohiogamecheck.com;
  • Visit a license agent; or
  • Call 866-703-1928 for operator assisted landowner game-check (a convenience fee of $5.50 applies).

The Division of Wildlife advises turkey hunters to wear hunter orange clothing when entering, leaving, or moving through hunting areas to remain visible to others. The list of open counties and other details regarding fall wild turkey hunting can be found in the 2018-2019 Ohio Hunting and Trapping Regulations or at wildohio.gov.

Several Hunting Seasons Get Underway

In addition to fall turkey hunting opening on Oct. 13, the statewide youth waterfowl hunting season will be held Oct. 6 and 7, followed by the regular statewide woodcock (Oct 12) and grouse (October 13) hunting seasons. Oct. 13 also marks the start of waterfowl hunting in the popular Lake Erie Marsh Zone, when the season opens for geese, ducks, coots and mergansers. Visit wildohio.gov for details.

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