Agronomy Notebook

How does flooding affect corn?

We have seen a lot of corn fields that were flooded in the low-lying areas. How does flooding affects corn plants and what can we do about it? • Like people, if plants can’t breathe, they can’t survive for long. Flooding interrupts the breathing and photosynthetic processes of plants. Obviously, plants which are completely covered [...]

Print Friendly
Read More

Palmer amaranth management tips

During winter meetings we have been emphasizing the importance of controlling Palmer Amaranth, one of the most dangerous weeds for Ohio agriculture. It is one of the fastest spreading weeds that is trying to get a foothold in the Corn Belt. It can spread like wild fire unless stopped in its tracks. Check out the [...]

Print Friendly
Read More
This field in Union County looked about the same two years ago at this time.

Problem soybean fields can recover

Corn got off to a rocky but reasonable start this year but soybeans went in at a rougher point as we progressed through the planting season. I am reminded of Purdue University’s Bob Nielsen and his corn article of a couple of years ago about the ugly duckling — ugly corn can turn into a [...]

Print Friendly
Read More
seedling corn

Advice on post-planting nutrient application

This year’s longer than usual planting season, and less than favorable weather throughout much of May, has led to a stressful time for many fields of corn across the region. “Give your crop the opportunity to have its top potential,” said  Lonny Smith, Agro-Culture Liquid Fertilizers Senior Marketing Manager. He said this time of year is [...]

Print Friendly
Read More

Assessing early season soybean injury

Spring 2014 has been quite challenging with wet soil and cold temperatures.  We’ve received several calls and e-mails regarding soybean seedling damage (from those who have actually been able to plant).  It appears that some soybean fields were hit with a “trifecta” of stress issues. What should we be looking for in terms of frost, [...]

Print Friendly
Read More
unnamed

Why do my soybeans look like they are dying?

This week we have had numerous reports throughout Ohio, Indiana, Illinois and Kentucky regarding soybeans that are not looking as healthy as we like. The majority of soybeans have the outside of the cotyledons that look brown as well as the hypocotyl, especially when in the neck stage.This appears to be happening to all varieties [...]

Print Friendly
Read More

What causes purple corn?

Cool and wet weather at early stages of corn development, as we are experiencing this year, are ideal for the appearance of purple plants. What causes the plants to become purple? Some of the reasons are given below: • Purple leaves are caused by a pigment called anthocyanin. When sugars produced by the chlorophyll cannot [...]

Print Friendly
Read More
seedling corn

Early season corn growth and development

A corn plant requires the accumulation of Growing Degree Units (GDUs) to reach maturity. This is regardless of the number of calendar days it takes to accumulate them. A 105-day hybrid requires about 2600 GDU’s to reach Black Layer and a 114-day hybrid requires about 2800. You can use this information to your advantage because [...]

Print Friendly
Read More
fairfield-county-wheat

Planting corn after a failed wheat crop

Late fall planting, harsh winter conditions and/or excessive rainfall can all lead to an undesirable wheat stand in the spring. Often growers would like to turn those failed wheat acres into a corn field and questions arise as to how to best ensure a successful transition. The transition starts with killing the existing wheat stand [...]

Print Friendly
Read More

Tips for high yielding soybeans

Rotate: The highest soybean yields often are in fields that have been continuous corn, have high yield potential soils and often have plenty of manure. Proper fertility levels: Soil test: pH 6.5-7, 30-60+ pounds per acre Phosphorous, 200 to 300 pounds per acre K depending on soil type. Adequate drainage is a very important consideration also. [...]

Print Friendly
Read More