Nutrient management & Water quality

No-till is a solution and a problem for phosphorus loss

By Matt Reese It seems that, with regard to the phosphorus problems in Lake Erie and other bodies of water, no-till is part of the solution and part of the problem. Lake Erie was once known around the world for its pollution and water quality problems, but in the 1970s, farmers and industry teamed up [...]

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Research takes broad look at Lake Erie Watershed

A new research project at Ohio State University integrates biological, physical and social sciences to develop a complete picture of what drives decision-making processes and environmental conditions in the Maumee River watershed. The four-year, $1.5 million project, funded by the National Science Foundation, will combine decision-making models with hydrological modeling and future climate change scenarios [...]

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USDA revises national nutrient management standard

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture has revised its national conservation practice standard on nutrient management to help producers better manage the application of nutrients on agricultural land. Proper application of nitrogen and phosphorus offers tremendous benefits to producers and the public, including cost savings to the producer and the [...]

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4R nutrient stewardship efforts address Lake Erie algae

Farmers and other key stakeholders successfully reduced total phosphorus going into Lake Erie over the past 50 years, but must revaluate nutrient management practices to more effectively manage dissolved phosphorus in those same bodies of water, according to one Ohio State University Extension expert. “It’s a different problem from what we had in the 1960s [...]

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New Report Shows Conservation Practices Work

A new USDA study shows that farmers using combinations of erosion-control and nutrient-management practices on cultivated cropland are reducing losses of sediment, nitrogen and phosphorous from farm fields and decreasing the movement of these materials to the Great Lakes and their associated waterways. “The Great Lakes Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) study confirms that good [...]

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Farmers get a closer look at Lake Erie algae issues

                          On Aug. 22, the Ottawa Soil and Water Conservation District held the “Lake Erie Ag Tour 2011.” With all the headlines about algal blooms on Ohio lakes the past two years, and farmers getting much of the blame, the goal of the [...]

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Clean water is a priority for Poultry Environmental Steward

By Matt Reese To do his part to prevent any sediment or nutrients from leaving the farm, Paul Dahlinghaus of Auglaize County has really stepped up the participation in EQIP on his dairy, turkey and hog farm. With his brother, he farms 600 acres and has continued his family’s tradition of dairy farming with milking [...]

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Watch that water flow and keep nutrients in the fields

By Justin Petrosino, Darke Ag and Natural Resources Extension educator The other day I noticed here in the office a little drip of water coming from the ceiling. The cause was ice thawing on the flat roof. Water melting from underneath that frozen layer of snow and ice was percolating its way into my office. [...]

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Don’t put daddy’s toothbrush in the toilet!

By Matt Reese My wife and I try not to have a long list of silly rules for our children to follow, but sometimes, their actions warrant rules. Here are a few of the strange rules in Reese family law. Do not stand on the table. There are clear safety issues when an 18-month old [...]

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Don't put daddy's toothbrush in the toilet!

By Matt Reese My wife and I try not to have a long list of silly rules for our children to follow, but sometimes, their actions warrant rules. Here are a few of the strange rules in Reese family law. Do not stand on the table. There are clear safety issues when an 18-month old [...]

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