The ground was uneven under this section of fencing so I used cinder blocks to keep goats from going under it and broken off plastic posts were tied to it to so electric wire could be added to keep goats off of the fence.

Hillbilly fencing

It would be wonderful if every livestock owner had the pleasure of owning permanent, high quality fencing for his or her animals, but often that is not the case. It seems like it takes years to save up the money and have the time to install nice looking, yet functional, livestock fencing at home. Even once quality fencing is installed, it seems like from time-to-time something breaks or is torn up critters and the fence requires emergency repair. It is in these emergency and temporary situations that hillbilly fencing engineering comes into play.

The fencing at my house isn’t pretty, but it is cheap and it seems to hold the animals in their pastures — most of the time. Although my ultimate goal is to have professionally installed livestock fencing on the property, I’m not ready to put out a huge chunk of change for that yet so I’ve often had to become creative to keep my goats and horses from escaping.

Since hillbilly fencing is not something they teach you in school — it is usually a self-taught skill that develops while handling numerous fencing emergencies through the years — I thought I’d put together a couple of creative fencing ideas to help other livestock owners keep their livestock inside the fence. You’ll find that I’m a huge fan of electric fencing and that almost all of my tips involving using it in some fashion.

Broken/rotting wooden fence posts

This post didn't need to be reinforced but the fence is still in bad shape so I went ahead and added insulators and electric wire to keep horses and goats away from it.
This post didn’t need to be reinforced but the fence is still in bad shape so I went ahead and added insulators and electric wire to keep horses and goats away from it.

When wooden fence posts start to rot or break off, it is best to replace them but in a pinch a t-post and electric fencing can work for a while. Take the t-post and pound it into the ground adjacent to the wooden post. Then use wire to tie the two posts together.  If there is not already electric fence attached to the post, I also like to go ahead and electrify the fencing near the rotting wooden post to keep animals from pushing on it. It is best to use fence insulators of some sort for running the electric wire, but I have a lot of broken off plastic fence posts lying around so I often wire them to the fence and then run the electric fencing through the plastic post keepers. Once this little project is complete, a sturdier wooden post with electric wire protecting it will hopefully keep the fence intact for a while longer.

Jumping electric wire

Waterline to jump electric fencingweb
The water line was flexible enough that it allowed me to run it and the wire up and over a gate so that the gate is still functional.

I recently needed to jump electric fence past a corral area and also past/through some fence lines. For the corral area, I ran the fence through a long section of left over water line I had lying around and then I used zip ties to fasten the water line with the electric wire in it to the corral area. This allowed me to electrify another section of fence without buying another fence charger.

This is a photo of the spindle being used to jump electric wire through metal fencing.
This is a photo of the spindle being used to jump electric wire through metal fencing.

Another time, I needed to jump electric fence through a double line of metal chain link fencing. This time I took a left over spindle from some railing we had installed on our porch and ran the electric wire through the spindle and then wire tied the spindle to the chain link fencing. Presto, electric wire was on now on the other side of the fence.

I do have plans to hopefully install some better fencing in the next year or two, but until then my hillbilly engineering has managed to keep my fence intact and my livestock in place.

Does anyone else have any other neat ideas for repairing fence in a pinch?

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