2021 Ohio Crop Tour: North leg

Crawford County

Corn: The corn we evaluated was 109-day maturity corn planted on May 16 with an estimated yield of 200 bushels per acre. It was another good crop.

Ears of corn in Crawford county.
Close-up of an ear of corn in Crawford county.

Soybeans: The soybeans we evaluated were a group 2.7 maturity bean planted in 15-inch rows on April 27 with an average pod count of four to five pods per plant and three beans per pod. Fungicide was applied to the crop. Overall, a good looking stand that could yield 55+ bushels per acre.

Crawford county soybean field.
Crawford county soybean sample.

Wyandot County

Corn: The corn we evaluated was 110 day maturity corn planted on April 26 with an estimated yield of 219 bushels per acre. The crop was sprayed with fungicide and insecticide after some pressure was evident. Overall, an excellent crop.

Ears of corn pulled from Wyandot county.
A cross-section of an ear of corn in Wyandot county.

Soybeans: The soybeans we evaluated were a group 2.6 maturity bean planted in 15-inch rows on May 21 with an average pod count four to five pods per plant and three beans per pod. This is another excellent crop with a yield estimation of 65+ bushels per acre.

A field of soybeans in Wyandot county.
Soybean plants in Wyandot county.

Hardin County

Corn: The corn we evaluated was 100-day maturity corn planted on April 26 with an estimated yield of 175 bushels per acre.

Ears of corn coming out of Hardin county.
Harold Waters, OSU Extension Agronomist, counts kernals in Hardin county.

Soybeans: The soybeans we evaluated were a group 2.5 maturity bean planted in 7.5-inch rows on April 26 with an average pod count of three pods per node and three beans per pod. The field was sprayed with a fungicide and insecticide. Sudden Death Syndrome was apparent in the field. There’s a lot of potential with some rain.

Soybeans exhibiting some SDS in Hardin county.
Hardin county soybeans

Hancock County

Corn: The corn we evaluated was 111-day maturity corn planted on May 17 with an estimated yield of 186 bushels per acre. Northern and grey leaf spot was present on the crop, nevertheless, it was a good-looking field with lots of small ears.

Corn being sampled in Hancock county.
A cross-section of corn in Hancock county.

Soybeans: The soybeans we evaluated were a group 3.1 maturity bean planted in 15-inch rows on May 16  with an average pod count of two to four pods per node and three beans per pod. Sudden death syndrome and powdery mildew were on top. The field had been sprayed with an insecticide. The yield estimate is 60+ bushels per acre.

Hancock county beans.
Samples pulled in Hancock county.

Putnam County

Corn: The corn we evaluated was 111-day maturity corn planted on May 19 with an estimated yield of 178 bushels per acre. Emergence issues were noted along with variable sizes in the plant. The sample might have fallen in a tillage test strip.

Putnam county ears of corn.
Examening Putnam county corn.

Soybeans: The soybeans we evaluated were a group 3.5 maturity bean planted in 7.5-inch rows on May 19 with an average pod count of two pods per node and three beans per pod. The crop was bushy and podded heavy. The group estimates a yield of 65+ bushels per acre.

Field of beans in Putnam county.
Soybean leaves in Putnam county.

Henry County

Corn: The corn we evaluated was 103-day maturity corn planted on April 27 with an estimated yield of 181 bushels per acre. Double ears were observed in the field, but really an ear and a half. Henry county is in need of rain.

“Double Ears” of corn in Henry county.
A cross-section view of Henry county corn.

Soybeans: The soybeans we evaluated were a group 3.3 maturity bean planted in 15-inch rows on May 21 with an average pod count of two to three pods per node and three beans per pod. Frog Eye leaf spot was observed in the crop. The stand was tall and thin and hasn’t canopied fully.

A soybean field in Henery county.
Leaves on a soybean plant in Henry county.

Defiance County

Corn: The corn we evaluated was 111-day maturity corn planted on April 27 with an estimated yield of 198 bushels per acre. The field was noted to be a uniform, clean, and consistent in both stand and ear size.

Ears of corn in Defiance county.
Cross-section of corn in Defiance county.

Soybeans: The soybeans we evaluated were a group 3.3 maturity bean planted in 15-inch rows on May 14 with an average pod count of two to three pods per node and three beans per pod. Yield potential is around 50 bushels per acre if the area receives rain.

A field of soybeans in Defiance county.
Samples pulled out of the Defiance county soybean field.

Paulding County

Corn: The corn we evaluated was 112-day maturity corn. The planting date is unknown. We are estimating a yield of 218 bu/ac for irrigated sections of the field and 175 bushels per acre for non-irrigated sections. Those portions that are irrigated look really good. Sections not irrigated looked really tough. The county has been dry.

A birds-eye view of a Paulding county cornfield.
Corn ears in Paulding County

Soybeans: The soybeans we evaluated were a group 2.8 maturity beans planted in 7.5-inch rows on an unknown date with an average pod count of two to four pods per node and three beans per pod. There appeared to be some emergence issues. The field was rated as fair, and the yield potential comes in the low 40’s.

Paulding county beans with evidence of stresses during emergence.
Another shot of some Paulding county beans.

Van Wert County

Corn: The corn we evaluated was 112-day maturity corn planted on May 16 with an estimated yield of 218 bushels per acre. The field was a very clean, very uniform stand. It had been sprayed with both fungicide and insecticide.

Counting kernels in Van Wert county.
Ears of corn in Van Wert county.

Soybeans: The soybeans we evaluated were a group 2.8 maturity bean planted in 15-inch rows on May 19 with an average pod count of three pods per node and three beans per pod. It was a uniform stand and was very clean. This field was also sprayed with fungicide and insecticide. There is a yield potential of 60+ bushels per acre.

Van Wert county bean field.
Straight to the roots in Van Wert county.

Mercer County

Corn: Mercer county corn was 110-day maturity planted on May 20. The crop has an estimated yield of 235 bushels per acre. The field was noted as very clean. The field is ten-year continuous corn-on-corn. The field is irrigated and is non-GMO and will likely be used for silage. Overall, it was rated as an excellent crop.

A cross-section of corn from a field in Mercer county.
Ears of Mercer county corn.

Soybeans: The soybeans evaluated were a group 3.6 maturity beans planted in 7.5-inch rows on May 22 with an average pod count of three to four pods per node and four beans per pod. It is anticipated that the beans will yield 60bu or greater. Overall, the field was extremely clean and uniform.

Mercer county beans.

The North leg is starting their morning off right!

Morrow County

Corn: The corn we evaluated was 111-day maturity corn planted on April 26with an estimated yield of 178 bushels per acre. The corn was clean. There was a little tip dieback noticed on some of the ears, but overall a rating of good for the field.

Counting kernels on an ear of corn in Morrow county.

The soybeans we evaluated were a group 3.0 maturity bean planted in 7.5-inch rows on May 17 with an average pod count of three pods per node and three beans per pod. The soybeans had a high planting population of 195,000, and a very good emergence and stand. The beans were clean with little disease or insect pressure.

Morrow county soybean plant.
Two samples taken from a field in Morrow county.

Delaware County

Corn: The corn we evaluated was 108-day maturity corn planted on May 20 with an estimated yield of 229 bushels per acre. There was not evidence of any insect pressure, and the corn appeared very clean and free of disease.

Delaware corn

Soybeans: The soybeans we evaluated were a group 3.7 maturity beans planted in 15-inch rows on May 20 with an average pod count of two to three pods per node and three beans per pod. A few aphids were found on the Soybeans, but nothing to sound the alarm about.

Delaware soybeans

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