2022 Ohio Crop Tour soybean results

By Matt Reese and Dusty Sonnenberg, CCA, Ohio Field Leader, a project of the Ohio Soybean Council and soybean checkoff

The 2022 Ohio Crop Tour was sponsored by Ohio Field Leader, a project of the Ohio Soybean Council and soybean checkoff. The Ohio State University Extension educators around the state also provided input by working with us on the Virtual Crop Tour. The in-person tour was held Aug. 8 and Aug. 9 with one group of scouts heading north and one group heading south. Each group sampled a representative soybean field. The county by county results are as follows.

A 4 bean pod

Adams County

These beans were planted May 10. They are in very good condition with little signs of weather-related stress or disease. There is some grass hopper feeding along the edge of the field. The canopy height is 36 to 45 inches with nodes spaced 3.5 to 4 inches in these 60+-bushel beans.

Fayette County

Soybeans: The beans looked good but they had a long way to go. There were a lot of blooms but no pods. Nodes were about 2.5 inches apart. With more rains these beans will make 45 bushels.

Greene County

Soybeans: The canopy was nearly 40 inches. There were some pods aborting with nodes 2.5 to 3 inches apart. There was no disease or pests. These are late beans and the field looked very good with 50- to 60-bushel yield.

Montgomery County

Soybeans: These beans were short, with a 22-inch canopy, but were even and fairly well podded. There was no insect feeding or disease in these 40- to 45-bushel beans. The calendar will play a big role in the final yield here too.

Preble County

Soybeans: The canopy 33 inches. The beans were good to excellent. The distance between nodes was excellent. The pods were filling and the yield was between 50 to 60 bushels. There had been more rain here than the other Preble Co. stop.

Darke County

Soybeans: The canopy was around 28 inches with 1.5 to 2-inch node spacing. They were starting to set pods, but a fair amount were aborted. The ground was very dry. This was a 40- to 45-bushel field in need of some rain.

Shelby County

Soybeans: Great plant health in this field of tall, bushy beans. The canopy was 38 inches with 2.5 to 3 inches between nodes. These was some insect feeding. No disease. Pod count was fair in these 50- to 60-bushel beans.

Miami County

Soybeans: These were nice looking beans with pods three-quarters of the way up the plant. The canopy was 36 inches with 2.5 inches between nodes. There were many 3-bean pods and 4 or 5 pod clusters. The beans were 50 to 60 bushels in this excellent field. There were a few Japanese beetles.

Clark County

Soybeans: These beans looked very good with a 34-inch canopy. The nodes were tight at 1 to 1.5 inches. There was almost no disease pressure in the R5, well podded, 60+-bushel beans.

Champaign County

Soybeans: These were tall beans! The canopy was at 48 inches. There was great plant health and almost no insect pressure. There were many 3-bean pods. Node spacing was at 3 inches in the 50- to 60-bushel field.

Madison County

Soybeans: These beans look good. The canopy was 42 inches and node distance was 2.5 to 3 inches. There were some stem diseases showing up. No insect pressure. Mostly 3-bean pods in this 55-bushel field.

Pickaway County

Soybeans: These were tall beans at 39 inches with some shorter areas of the field. There were 2-inch nodes. Bean leaf beetles had done some minimal feeding. These beans are 60+ bushels at R4. They are well podded.

Franklin County

Soybeans: The plant health in this bottom ground was good. The canopy was 23 inches. The planting date was June 19. There were 2-inch nodes. No noticeable disease. Slight insect damage. The beans were still in bloom. Yields were in the 40- to 50-bushel range in the good to fair range.

Fairfield County

Soybeans: There was a good canopy at 28 inches tall. The distance between nodes was 2.5 to 3. No disease. There was minimal bean leaf beetle feeding. They were at R3 with many 3-bean pods. They are still adding pods but look to be around 50 bushels.

Licking County

Soybeans: The canopy was at 30 inches with 3-inch node spacing. There were a lot of blooms and finger length pods near the top. These were very good beans, but were a little weedy in places. The stand was a bit thin but the plants were heavily podded. These were 50- to 60-bushel beans.

Delaware County

Soybeans: The soybeans we evaluated were a 3.1 bean. They were planted on May 25th in 15 inch rows. There was some inconsistency in height and holes in some spots as well as pale in color due to excess water. The canopy was 36″ with moderately spaced nodes. There were mild symptoms of septoria and 5% defoliation from bean leaf beetle. The beans were at R4 with a population of 126,000. The average pod count was 34 with 2 -3 beans per pod and 16 nodes per plant. It had an estimated yield range of 40-50 bushels per acre due to the inconsistencies in stand.

Logan County

Soybeans: The soybeans were the tallest observed at 50″ but uneven in height. The color was uniform. There were 15 nodes per plant very stretched out and 19 pods with more to come and an average of 3 beans per pod. The plant stand was 122,000 plants per acre. It was at the R3 growth stage. It had the least amount of insect damage we have seen on the tour. Yield estimate of 50-60 bushel per acre.

Van Wert County

Soybeans: The soybeans we evaluated were in 15 inch rows. The stand count was 94,000 plants per acre. The average pod county was 66 with mostly 3 but a few 4 beans per pod. Nodes were packed at the bottom and then elongated up the stem. There were 17 nodes per stem. The beans were at the early R5. growth stage. The beans were tall with a canopy height of 45″. As in other fields scouted, there was some septoria in the lower canopy and some bean leaf beetle feeding noted. It had an estimated yield of a strong 60+ bushels per acre.

Paulding County

Soybeans: The soybeans we evaluated were a 3.4 bean., They were planted on May 31 in 7.5 inch rows. The population was 160,000. The soybeans were at the R4 growth stage. The average pod county was 7 with many more to come. They had 3 beans per pod. The canopy height was 20-24″, so they were short beans. Like most fields seen, there was a little septoria and a little bean leaf beetle feeding. It had an estimated yield range of 40-50 bushels per acre.

Defiance County

Soybeans: The soybeans we evaluated were a 3.2 bean. They were planted in 15 inch rows. The canopy height was 34″. It was a uniform height field. There was a consistent stand with both height and color. The lower nodes were stacked, but then spaced out as it moved up the plant. There was evidence of septoria on the lower leaves and some manganese deficiency detected. There was bean leaf beetle feeding, but no more than 5% defoliation. It is at the R5 growth stage with 145,000 plant population. The average was 14 nodes, 39 pods, and mostly 3 bean pods. The yield estimate range was 45-55 bushels per acre.

Henry County

Soybeans: The soybeans we evaluated were a 3.0 bean. They were planted on May 10th in 15 inch rows. The beans had a consistent height and dark green color. They were at the R5 growth stage at 132,000 population. The average pod county was with 59 beans per pod with 3 beans per pod. The beans were tall with 17 nodes per plant, uniformly spaced. It had an estimated yield range of 60+ bushels per acre. Some septoria was observed on the lower leaves. There was also some bean leaf beetle feeding. Probably the heaviest to this point, but not excessive.

Putnam County

Soybeans: The soybeans we evaluated were a 3.6 group bean. They were planted on June 1st in 15 inch rows. The population was 146,000 plants per acre. It was at the R3 growth stage and 13 nodes per plant. The nodes were moderately spaced. The pods that were developed, were 2-3 beans per pod. There are a lot of flowers still and potential. The height was inconsistent, but the color was consistent. The estimated yield is 50-60 bushels per acre.

Hancock County

Soybeans: The soybeans we evaluated were a 3.2 bean., They were planted on May 28th in 15 inch rows. The field was at R4. The stand was thin, with a population of 92,000. There were 15 nodes per plant and 48 pods per plant with 2-3 beans per pod. A relatively clean field with minor bean leaf beetle feeding and a little septoria. The majority of the field was uniform height with some water damage areas. There was tremendous branching in the plants. The yield estimate is 45-55 bushels per acre.

Wyandot County

Soybeans: The soybeans we evaluated were a 3.1 bean., They were planted on May 15th in 15 inch rows. The beans were at R4 with a population of 110 plants per acre. The average pod count was 26 with 3 beans per pod. It had a lot of branching. It had an estimated yield range of 56-60 bushels per acre. The beans were sprayed with a fungicide. There was a little septoria present. some bean leaf beetle feeding. Overall it was a clean field.

Marion County

Soybeans: The soybeans we evaluated were planted on May 10th in 20 inch rows. The average pod count was 60 with 2-3 beans per pod. It had an estimated yield range of 60+ The beans are tall and some had 17 nodes that were spaced out. The field was relatively clean with a little bean leaf beetle feeding.

Crawford County

Soybeans: The soybeans were planted in 15 inch rows. The average pod county was 24 per plant, but at just the R3 growth stage, there was still tremendous potential for more. It had an estimated yield range of 60+ bushels per acre given the potential and R3 growth stage and sufficient moisture in the soil. The soybeans were consistently green and some height variability with good branching. Nodes were tight on the stem with 12 nodes per plant on average. The population was 130,000 plants per acre. There were 28 pods per plant with many more to come. There was some septoria noted and minor bean leaf beetle feeding (less than 5% defoliation).

Richland County

Soybeans: The soybeans we evaluated were a group 3.5 bean. They were planted on June 11th in 7.5 inch rows. The planting population was 200,000. The beans were at R2. The general conditions were a consistent even green, but uneven height. Average canopy height of 24″. Stacked nodes. There was minor Japanese beetle and bean leaf beetle Yield Guestimate is 35-45 bushels per acre. If it is a late fall with good rains, it has greater potential.

Knox County

Soybeans: The soybeans we evaluated were a group 2.5 bean. They were planted on April 28th in 15 inch rows. The population was 106,000. The field was at R5 with an average of 16 nodes per plant and the average pod count was 34 with 3 beans per pod. It had an estimated yield of 60+. Some sudden death syndrome was detected in the field.

Morrow County

Soybean: The soybeans we evaluated were a 3.4 bean. They were planted on May 19th in 10 inch rows. They were at the R5 growth stage. The average stand was 100,000. The pod count average was 40 with 15 nodes and 2-3 with few 4 bean pods. It had an estimated yield range of 50-60 bushels per acre with some thin spots, and some very good. Some septoria brown spot was noticed, and a few bean leaf beetles and green clover worms were detected feeding on the leaves. There was some defoliation recorded, but not significant.

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