Ohio’s new beginning farmer tax credits

By Peggy Kirk Hall, director of agricultural law, Ohio State University Agricultural and Resource Law Program

The idea to use income tax incentives to help Ohio’s beginning farmers gain access to agricultural assets floated around for several years in the Ohio General Assembly. The idea became a reality when the Beginning Farmer Bill sponsored by Rep. Susan Manchester (R-Waynesfield) and Rep. Mary Lightbody (D-Westerville) passed the legislature, was signed by Governor DeWine and became effective on July 18, 2022. The law is now in the hands of the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA), charged with implementing its provisions.

The new law sets initial eligibility criteria for certifying “beginning farmers,” directs ODA to establish the certification program, and authorizes two types of income tax credits for certified beginning farmers and those who sell or lease assets to certified beginning farmers. According to ODA, the income tax credits will be available for 2023, once the certification program is up and running. 

Here’s a summary of what to expect from the new law.

Certification of beginning farmers 

The ODA will establish a process for designating a farmer who meets the eligibility criteria to be a “certified beginning farmer.” The law sets initial criteria for beginning farmers designation but also allows ODA to create additional requirements. ODA may seek participation from Ohio State and Central State in the certification of beginning farmers. The initial certification conditions are:

  • Resident of Ohio.
  • Seeking entry to or has entered farming within the last 10 years.
  • Farms or intends to farm on land in Ohio.
  • Is not a partner, member, shareholder, or trustee of the assets the individual is seeking to purchase or rent.
  • Has a total net worth of less than $800,000 in 2021, including spouse and dependent assets, as adjusted for inflation each year.
  • Provides majority of daily physical labor and management of the farm.
  • Has adequate farming experience or knowledge in the type of farming for which seeking assistance.
  • Submits projected earnings statements and demonstrates profit potential.
  • Demonstrates farming will be a significant source of income for the individual.
  • Participates in a financial management program approved by ODA.

Financial management programs for beginning farmers 

ODA must approve financial management programs that meet the certification requirement, in consultation with Ohio State and Central State. The list of approved programs will be available on ODA’s website.

Income tax credits for certified beginning farmers 

An individual who attains certification as a beginning farmer may apply for a state income tax credit equal to the cost incurred during the calendar year for participating in an ODA approved financial management program or a substantially equivalent financial management program approved by the USDA. The tax credit is nonrefundable. If the tax credit exceeds the beginning farmer’s tax liability in the year granted, the excess can carry forward for not more than three succeeding tax years.

Income tax credits for owners who sell or rent assets to certified beginning farmers 

 An owner who sells or rents “agricultural assets” to a certified beginning farmer during the calendar year or in either of the two preceding calendar years may apply for a state income tax credit. The credit will be equal to 3.99% of the sale price or the gross rental income received during the calendar year for either a cash or share rental agreement. “Agricultural assets” includes agricultural land (at least 10 acres and in agricultural production or earning $2500 in average yearly gross income from agricultural production if under 10 acres), livestock, facilities, buildings, and machinery used for agricultural production in Ohio. The owner cannot be an equipment dealer, however, nor can the certified beginning farmer receiving the assets be a partner, member, shareholder, or trustee of the owner of the assets. Rented assets must be rented at prevailing community rates, as determined by ODA in consultation with the Ohio tax commissioner. The tax credit is nonrefundable but may be carried forward for seven succeeding tax years if it exceeds the owner’s tax liability.

Time to plan

As we await ODA’s rules and procedures for the new tax credits, beginning and existing farmers can use this time for planning. Review the new law with your attorney and accountant to determine how the income tax credits could affect you. If you are a beginning farmer seeking agricultural assets, spend time trying to connect with an existing farmer who is ready to sell or rent agricultural assets. Although the 3.99% credit for those transfers may not sound significant, run the numbers and see how they could play out. The hope of the new law is that those numbers will be enough to help a beginning farmer have greater access to those important assets that are critical to farming in Ohio.

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