2020 Ohio Crop Progress Update

Corn and soybeans emerged, wheat makes progress

Rainfall increased throughout the state at an opportune time, causing soil moisture to improve, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. While precipitation increased overall, dry weather continued in a few areas of the state. Topsoil moisture, however, increased from 53 percent adequate or surplus last week to 69 percent adequate or surplus this week. Average temperatures for the week were approximately 1 degree above historical normals, and the entire state averaged just over 1 inch of precipitation. There were 5.2 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending June 28. During the week, farmers side dressed nitrogen on corn and applied herbicides to corn and soybeans. Winter wheat continued to mature while reporters continued to anticipate the start of harvest. Soybean planting progress reached 100 percent, ahead of the five-year average by 5 percentage points, while soybeans blooming was 11 percent. Corn emerged progress was 100 percent, 4 percentage points ahead of the five-year average.… Continue reading

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Dry weather leading to early signs of drought stress

As dry weather continued, soil moisture decreased and crops began to show signs of drought stress, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture decreased from 75% adequate or surplus last week to 53% adequate or surplus this week. In addition to dry weather slowing the emergence of soybeans and corn, crop condition worsened. Average temperatures for the week were approximately 2 degrees below historical normals, and the entire state averaged close to zero inches of precipitation. There were 6.3 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending June 21.

The drier weather did allow farmers to cut hay and continue other field activities, including planting, spraying herbicides, and sidedressing corn. Winter wheat was maturing, with reporters anticipating the start of harvest in one or two weeks. Armyworms continued to be a problem in wheat fields. Soybean planting progress reached 98%, ahead of the five-year average by 8 percentage points.

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Good weather pushes progress

A variety of field activities continued due to dry and warm weather, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. While warm windy weather created ideal conditions for making dry hay, windy conditions also may have negatively impacted some crops. In addition, armyworms negatively impacted crops, causing damage to wheat, other small grains and hay fields. Average temperatures for the week were approximately 1 degree above historical normals and the entire state averaged close to a half inch of precipitation. There were 5.8 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending June 14.

Farmers worked on spot planting, tilling, spraying herbicides, side-dressing corn, and cutting hay. Topsoil moisture decreased from 12% surplus last week to 5% surplus this week. Soybean planting progress was 93%, ahead of the five-year average by 10 percentage points. Corn planting progress was 6 percentage points ahead of the five-year average at 98%. Sixty-three percent of corn was considered good or excellent and 73% of pasture and range was considered good or excellent compared to 55% the previous year.

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Sunnier skies lead to planting progress

Warmer temperatures and drier soils allowed for more field work and fast crop development, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Farmers took advantage of this week’s improved weather to plant or replant corn and soybeans as well as chop wheat and hay for forage. Despite less precipitation, some low lying and poorly draining areas were still wet from the previous week’s rain. Average temperatures for the week were approximately 7 degrees above historical normals and the entire state averaged less than 1 inch of precipitation. There were 3.2 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending May 31.

With less precipitation occurring this week, farmers continued planting and cutting hay. Topsoil moisture decreased from 56% surplus last week to 30 percent surplus this week. Corn planted progress was 80%, 3 percentage points ahead of the five-year average and 50% ahead of the previous year. Additionally, 62% of corn was considered good or excellent and 71% of pasture and range was considered good or excellent compared to 54% last year.

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Significant rainfall slowed progress

A modest amount of field work occurred in the state due to increased rain, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. High amounts of precipitation caused localized flooding throughout the state, bringing planting progress to a halt in most areas. Although reporters suspected some damage occurred to recently planted crops, most noted that it was too early to tell how severe that damage was. Average temperatures for the week were close to historical normals and the entire state averaged just under 3 inches of precipitation. There were 1.4 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending May 24.

Despite increased amounts of rain, farmers were able to continue small amounts of spraying activities and began hay cutting. Topsoil moisture increased from 29% surplus last week to 56% surplus this week. Corn planted progress was 66%, 2 percentage points ahead of the five-year average. Soybeans planted progress remained ahead of the five-year average by 9 percentage points.

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Planting continued as temperatures remained cool

While temperatures remained cool throughout the state, farmers made good planting progress, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Some damage was reported to winter wheat from freezing temperatures early in the week while rain activity late in the week may have caused damage to crops not yet emerged. Average temperatures for the week were below historical normals and the entire state averaged close to 1-inch precipitation. There were 3.8 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending May 17.

Farmers continued tillage and spraying activities. Large increases in corn and soybeans planting were reported in the Northwest portion of the state. Corn planted progress was 57 percent, 8 percentage points ahead of the five-year average. Soybeans planted progress was ahead of the five-year average while soybeans emerged was behind the five-year average due to recent cooler than normal temperatures slowing germination. Sixty-six percent of pasture and range was considered good or excellent compared to 53 percent last year.

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May 11 shows some planting progress despite cold weather

Farmers made planting progress last week despite temperatures averaging more than 10 degrees below normal, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Freezing temperatures late in the week endangered crops already emerged and caused damage to fruit trees in bloom. The entire State averaged less than 1 inch of precipitation. There were 4.2 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending May 10.

In addition to planting farmers installed tile, tilled soil, sprayed herbicides, and applied fertilizer. Sixty- nine percent of pasture and range was considered good or excellent compared to 51 percent last year. Oats were 46 percent emerged compared to a five- year average of 48 percent. Corn planted progress was 33 percent, 3 percentage points behind the five-year average. Last week, farmers in Northwest Ohio pushed their planters hard, planting corn and soybeans at a rapid clip.

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May brings progress with fieldwork and planting

Typical Spring weather conditions allowed operators to work the fields, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Average temperatures were slightly above historical normals and the entire State averaged just about 1 inch of precipitation. There were 2.5 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending May 3.

Last week farmers applied fertilizer, repaired tiles, applied manure, and planted corn and soybeans where they could. Pasture and range condition was considered 66% good or excellent compared to 46% last year. Oats were 36% emerged compared to a five-year average of 30%. Corn planted progress was ahead of last year but behind the five-year average while soybean planted progress was ahead of last year and the five-year average.

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Corn and soybean planting getting started

Farmers planted some of the first 2020 corn and soybean fields in Ohio last week, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Temperatures averaged 5 degrees cooler than historical normals and the entire State averaged normal amounts of precipitation last week. There were 2.7 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending April 26.

Fields were dry enough most of the week and farmers worked the ground, sprayed weeds, spread manure and fertilizers, and tiled fields. Corn and soybean planting began in earnest on some farms. Freezing temperatures, mainly in the north, caused damage to some orchard blossoms and alfalfa fields. Oats were 18% emerged compared to a five-year average of 16%. The winter wheat crop was rated 71% good to excellent condition compared to 29% last year.

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Crop Progress: Wheat jointing, Oats being planted

Rain fell and fields remained too wet for most equipment, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Temperatures averaged 4 degrees higher than historical normals and the entire State averaged about an inch of rain. There were 2.0 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending April 12. Oats planted progress jumped to 24 percent complete last week despite the short window for fieldwork. Other field activity was limited and ranged from manure hauling, spraying weeds, to tiling fields. Top dressing of winter wheat with nitrogen continued although consistent rain threatened to wash away application effectiveness. Hay fields and pastures continued to slowly green up even as soil moisture levels remained mostly surplus.… Continue reading

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