Between the Rows

A look back at 2020 from Between the Rows

Charlie Kail

No two growing seasons are alike. That’s the fun part of this game we play. We keep doing the same thing over and over again and expect the same result, but when it comes to rain it gives you a different result and sometimes you don’t like it. It was wet early so the root systems weren’t deep. Then it dried out in some places and the roots weren’t deep enough to chase the water.

A successful 2020 was about getting the rain. We planted the corn in ideal to too wet conditions. It stayed wet long enough to get the corn going and then it got dry. There is just nothing you can do to fight that.

We lost control of marestail in the beans late in the season around here. That was mainly because of a lack of residual, either not putting down residual at all or not putting down enough too early to survive the summer.… Continue reading

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Farmers taking advantage of great harvest weather

Charlie Kail

There is more corn standing out in the field than I thought there should be with the weather we have had. We have had straight runs of fantastic harvest weather. A couple of guys have been telling me that the corn is just too wet. My response to them is that the deer and the raccoons are getting it instead because they don’t mind if it is a little wetter.

I had one guy tell me he was running 11 bushels per acre and then a minute later he was running 240. When you have that kind of variation in yields you are going to have moisture that varies too. There will be corn moisture at 17% up into the 23% or 24% range. When I was a kid we couldn’t get corn below 22%. The new hybrids obviously dry down a lot better than the old ones did.… Continue reading

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Rains slow harvest progress

Charlie Kail

We’ve gotten around 1.5 inches of rain in the last few days. The rains slowed things down. Most people were running beans. I’d say beans are 60% to 70% off. Corn has been coming off in the 17% moisture range, but there is a lot more short season corn planted today than what there was 20 years ago. We are trying to get the corn off ahead of the deer. When the deer run out of green grass after it frosts a couple of times, then they start working on the corn. In areas with a lot of deer pressure, they are planting 97- or 95- day corn to get it off. If they don’t, they’ll be riding along and just watching corncobs go into the header.

Corn yields are everywhere from 35 bushels per acre to 200 around here and that can be in the same pass in the same field.… Continue reading

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Farmers taking full advantage of beautiful harvest weather

Willie Murphy

We finally got started on Oct. 1. We ran some of the very first corn that was planted on May 13. It was 105-day corn and it was 21% to 22% moisture, which is drier than we thought it would be. The yield was pretty good for being early corn. We ran that and moved to corn we’d planted on May 16 and it was a fuller season corn. We thought the moisture would be in the mid-20s and it was 30%. We ran about four loads of that and decided that was enough. That was a little too wet to handle.

We have been hearing around the area that a lot of corn moisture has been in the mid- to upper 20s. The ethanol plant in Bloomingburg is paying around $4 for dry corn because everyone is cutting beans, so there has been some corn run around here that is pretty wet.… Continue reading

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Harvest underway around the state

Charlie Kail

We have had two weeks of beautiful hay making weather. I think we have covered every acre that was standing high enough to mow. We ran a bunch of square bales on Saturday. The air is moving, the temperature has been good and there have been half decent sunny days. We haven’t had any rain, though, in 14 days and the ground is dried out.

There are a few guys starting on corn and beans. Moisture on the corn has been 17% to probably 45%. So far, yields have been average around here, whatever that would be. Most people are just nosing the combines in to make sure everything is running right.

The guys who believe in the fly free date are getting ready to plant wheat. The guys that say fly free date isn’t important already have their wheat in the ground. The research I’ve seen out of Ohio State over the years says Oct.… Continue reading

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Cool weather delaying early start to harvest

Willie Murphy

It had been 9 days since we had a measureable rain. Early Sunday morning we got some rain. That was the first time we went for more than 7 days right here on the south side of Wilmington without a measurable rain since we planted.

Our double-crop beans are still filling some pods and that rain probably helped them. A couple more rains this week will still help them along.

We are not quite done with third-cutting hay. We got a bunch of the alfalfa cut last week. We had a stretch of weather where we could bale hay for 7 days in a row, but we only got about 3 hours a day to bale by the time it got dry and then the dew started coming back up. We need to get the rain to get the alfalfa going again as we head into fall.

I think our crops around here are going to be really good, though I think there will be some pockets that were hotter and drier during pollination that won’t be so good.… Continue reading

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Dry weather still a concern as harvest draws near

Willie Murphy

We had a half-inch of rain the week before last. Then this past Saturday it was scattered but in the northern end of the county where it had been dry all summer we got an inch of rain and that will really help with the final fill on the beans and the double-crop beans. In the southern part of the county we got two-tenths.

The corn is pretty well made, other than maybe the later planted corn may get a bit more kernel depth. The later planted beans could still use a rain to fill out the pods. The earlier beans are pretty well made now. The double-crop beans could use some more rain. We don’t need any wind, but we could use some rain this week, which would really help the hay too.

We are getting ready to start third-cutting hay. For no more rain than we’ve had it has grown better than we anticipated.… Continue reading

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Rain haves and have nots showing up in 2020

Charlie Kail

The rain has been spotty. There is fantastic looking corn around here. Most of the time the reclaimed ground where they stripped coal years ago has shallow topsoil, with a lot of stone in it and there is some coal in there to mess with your mind so you can’t get the nitrogen right. It is 120-bushel corn ground. I was in a field of reclaimed ground that has had rain virtually every week with a population of 34,000 to 36,000. It looks like a picket fence. It is completely pollinated to the ends of the ears. We were coming up with 217 bushels for the yield in that field. It is phenomenal. If you go down the road 5 miles in some of the best ground around here, that corn will be lucky if it breaks 120 bushels.

The temperatures have made a difference too on the backsides of the hills.… Continue reading

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Rain haves and have-nots showing up in Ohio

Patty Mann

Last week over a 3-day period we got 1.8 inches of rain. That only puts us up over 2.5 inches for July, so you can see how much on the short end we were. Everything has turned around. The corn grew and greened up and most of it is pollinating. We are really thankful that rain came when it did. It sounds like we have a good chance of more rain this afternoon and then some cooler nighttime temperatures, which will definitely help as well.

I don’t think we have anything quite to brown silk yet, but the early stuff is well along through pollination. Some of the later stuff planted in late May is just starting to poke a few tassels out. That corn has gotten more rain and just looks phenomenal.

We haven’t seen disease issues yet. The beans are approaching or are at R3 and we have been spraying some fungicide on the beans.… Continue reading

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Dry weather concerns continue, though recent rains helped

Charlie Kail

We got 4 tenths and that brought by my yard from brown back to looking like it might turn green. The rain has been spotty. There are places that have gotten 3 to 4 inches of rain in the last 3 or 4 weeks and then there are places like I call the “Mechanicstown Desert” where we’ve just settled the dust a few times. There is an area north of town that is excessively dry compared to a mile above it and a mile below it.

The crops are showing signs that they are not deep rooted with all of the rain we had when we were starting out. We have too many shallow roots out there. We have a lot of fields that look like we are growing pineapples instead of corn. We have soybean leaves standing up on edge trying to get out of the sun. Some fields look pretty rough and some look pretty good because they got a shot of rain.… Continue reading

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Rain is a good thing

Willie Murphy

We had a pretty big rain the week of June 4 and since then it has been hit or miss. Since then, it has gotten really dry. This weekend where the corn was stressed it was starting to roll up a little bit. If we don’t get rain here relatively soon it is going to start being a problem for the crops. We did get around 2 tenths last night and there is more rain in the forecast today.

Once we got planting wrapped up, everything emerged well. Compared to the last couple of years that have been pretty stressful we are very happy with the way our crops look. We did finish sidedressing all of our corn this past Friday, so we are ready for it to set in rain for a little bit.

The wheat is getting close. We are hoping the first of next week we’ll be able to run it.… Continue reading

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Planting (and re-planting) continues between rains

Patty Mann

We had a pretty good run up until the night before last where we got some more rain. Unfortunately the area we are working got more rain than the home farm. We may be out for a couple of days and we were hoping to get done this week. We are probably going to plant a couple more fields of corn and then we’ll have to flip a few acres to beans.

Some areas are wetter than others and we have to go out ahead to look at fields to determine where it is dry enough to run. We thought with those few hot and windy days everything would dry off, but there still seems to be a lot of moisture in the ground.

The biggest issues we are having are in the fields that were prevent plant last year. The weed pressure is huge there. We are having to work ground an extra time or so and that is slowing down the process.… Continue reading

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Progress in planting made between rains

Willie Murphy

We have gotten a bunch of rain but we were able to plant last Tuesday. We planted a field of beans and it was getting pretty fit. On Wednesday we got both planters up and running and got the corn planter going. We got all the bugs worked out and got a bunch planted on Wednesday and Thursday. Then we got a spotty rain here and we got maybe two tenths. Further north got anywhere from four tenths to eight tenths on Thursday.

It kind of dried back out for us and we were able to plant corn all weekend. We started late Friday and planted until the middle of the day on Monday and got about half of our corn planted. North of here they got more rain. Altogether I think they got 2.5 inches from Monday to today. We are fortunate. You don’t have to go very far from here before it gets pretty wet.… Continue reading

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Jake Heilmann, Between the Rows 2020 Farm Highlight

Jake is one of our Between the Rows farmers for 2020. Jake talks with Matt Reese about his farming operation. Jake is the 4th generation on the farm and he farms in partnership with Matt Ditzig and Randy Mead. The sandy soils of Lucas county lend themselves to corn after corn and make for an interesting story. Our Between the Rows program is brought to you by Seed Genetics Direct. Learn more at www.Seedgeneticsdirect.com.… Continue reading

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Cold weather and frosty fields

Charlie Kail

I work with several guys who have 200 or 300 acres who have the crops in the ground. We’ve got 25% of the corn and beans in the ground right now around here. I haven’t heard of anything not growing. I had corn spiking on Saturday that had been in the ground for 10 or 12 days. That was on sandy ground. The guys on sand are getting things in the ground and up. The heavy clay guys haven’t been doing too much.

In some of these areas the ground is either going up or it’s going down. These hills are nice to you when it comes to the showers because they run off. If you give us a day we could run again after the rain this weekend.

There are a pile of acres sprayed in this area. It might not have been really warm but we have been running dry fertilizer hard here too.… Continue reading

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Planting progress hit or miss (mostly miss) so far

Willie Murphy

We had a little more rain than some other areas. We’ve had one day in the last two weeks where it was fit to do some tillage. We were able to work all day Wednesday April 22 and then it started raining again. We had well over an inch of rain in the last 3 or 4 days and it is going to be a little while until we get back out there. We have also had some very cool nights and it brings the moisture come back up out of the ground at night. That makes it hard to get much done.

There was some corn in the area planted on April 22. Some guys had done some tillage awhile back and planted into stale seedbeds. We saw some N getting put on and we got 500 acres of bean burndown on. There have been other days where it was dry enough to spray but it was too windy.… Continue reading

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Meet one of the Ohio’s Country Journal/Ohio Ag Net Between the Rows Farmers: Willie Murphy

Willie Murphy farms in Clinton county Ohio with his father, brother and uncle. The Murphys are what you would call a diversified operation, producing row crops, feeder cattle, brood cows, and hogs. Along with a traditional rotation of corn, beans, and wheat they also grow barley, spelt and hay.

Between the Rows is presented by Seed Genetics Direct. Value. Knowledge. Performance,  IT’S IN OUR GENETICS.… Continue reading

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