Horse Sense

Strategic deworming for horses

By Kimberly Cole, Extension Equine Specialist, Ohio State University

Internal parasites can cause a variety of problems in the horse ranging from a dull hair coat and unthriftiness to colic and even death. There are several species of internal parasites that can infect horses — most notably small and large strongyles, ascarids, tapeworms, pinworms and bots. Infected horses shed the parasite eggs in their manure, contaminating pastures, paddocks and pens. The eggs or larvae are ingested while the horse is grazing and mature within the horse’s digestive tract. Some parasites are able to migrate to other areas of the horse’s body, causing significant damage along the way.
In the past, traditional deworming recommendations were to treat horses with a different deworming product every 60-90 days. Research has shown that only about 20% of the horses in a herd shed the majority (> 80%) of parasites on a pasture. Treating horses with low numbers of parasites not only wastes money, but can promote resistance to dewormers.… Continue reading

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Amon Carter knew his audience

By Kirby Hidy

Among my personal heroes is the late Amon G. Carter, president and publisher of the Fort Worth Star Telegram from 1923 until his death in 1955. Carter was the most brash and colorful promoter of Fort Worth, Texas that ever lived. I encourage you to “Google” him one of these days when you get a chance – fascinating story I think. Mr. Carter used to say, “…The further from home a Texan travels, the more Texan they become.”
In 1995, I moved my young family 1,200 miles from our home in Jeffersonville, Ohio, to our new home west of Ft. Worth, Texas. We lived there for nearly 13 years until my daughter was accepted into the Script School of Journalism at Ohio University. We might have stayed there even then but my daughter wasn’t too keen on being 1,200 miles away from Mama and, well, I think Mama felt pretty much the same.… Continue reading

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Purina Ultium Growth Horse Feed

Key components to horse breeding success include strong genetics, thorough management, skilled training, veterinary care and proper nutrition. And, with more than 115 years of setting the standards of equine nutrition, Purina recognizes just how critical certain nutritional advantages can be in supporting the healthy structural growth and development of horses. That’s why through extensive research and field-testing, Purina introduces Ultium Growth horse formula, a premium nutritional feed specially formulated for broodmares and growing horses.
Purina Ultium Growth horse feed’s unique formulation supports equine growth and development through all stages of the gestating mare, allowing for a foal’s best start by providing nutrition at the source. It also helps mares maintain ideal body weight and body condition during lactation and supports steady, consistent foal growth and development.

The making of Purina Ultium Growth Horse Formula

Purina Ultium Growth horse formula was conceptualized after the successful launch of the original Ultium Competition horse formula.… Continue reading

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Secret layover in Ohio for Budweiser Clydesdales

By Ed Chatfield, OCJ field reporter

The Budweiser Clydesdales made an unofficial visit to the Clark County Fairgrounds in Springfield, Ohio, March 27-29. The team and crew were resting while traveling from St. Petersburg, Florida to Cleveland, Ohio to participate in festivities for the Cleveland Indians Opening Day Ceremonies.

According to Burt Westerbrook, one of the Budweiser Clydesdale crewmembers, there are three teams of Clydesdales that travel the country to promote Budweiser. The team resting in Clark County was the East Hitch out of Merrimack, New Hampshire. Each team spends more than 300 days a year traveling to and from special events.

Although the horses were not officially on display during this rest stop in Springfield, a few visitors managed to sneak a peak at them.

Tony Davis, a fireman in Springfield Township, and his young son Hunter arrived aboard a fire truck to have a special visit with Brewer, the team’s Dalmatian.… Continue reading

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Horse Sense: Kissing a fool

By: Kim Lemmon, managing editor

 

So if you haven’t figured it out yet, the fool is me!

When I was a riding lesson instructor, keeping my program’s visitors and students safe was my priority. I forced everyone to abide by a long list of rules. I’m sure a lot of folks, including my husband, Mark, thought my rules were a bit restrictive and obsessive but I felt the rules were a necessity.

I was fortunate to have only a few accidents occur during my time as an instructor. We averaged about one fall every other year. No one was seriously hurt thankfully. To me, the lack of serious injuries and infrequency of falls proved my rules were working but something was lacking.

No one broke my rules except Mark. I would occasionally catch Mark hand feeding a treat to the horses and it

actually made me a little sad. I wanted them to be glad to see me, too.… Continue reading

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Surprises in the horse barn aren’t always pleasant

At this point in my life, I’m never really very surprised when I find some kind of problem or disaster in the barn. I will admit that I did reach my breaking point last spring, when the barn flooded and my pregnant goats where standing in three inches of water but that was a pretty extreme problem.

Most of the time rotten mini horses, Mike and Ike, create the little surprises I meet randomly during my morning feedings.

I wasn’t really very surprised when I saw Mike and Ike munching on several bales of hay they had managed to pull into their stalls one morning last week. Really it was only a matter of time until it happened.

Last summer, in an effort to cram as much hay into the barn as possible, my husband, Mark, and I filled two of our three horse stalls with hay. It seemed like a great idea at the time.… Continue reading

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Surprises in the horse barn aren't always pleasant

At this point in my life, I’m never really very surprised when I find some kind of problem or disaster in the barn. I will admit that I did reach my breaking point last spring, when the barn flooded and my pregnant goats where standing in three inches of water but that was a pretty extreme problem.

Most of the time rotten mini horses, Mike and Ike, create the little surprises I meet randomly during my morning feedings.

I wasn’t really very surprised when I saw Mike and Ike munching on several bales of hay they had managed to pull into their stalls one morning last week. Really it was only a matter of time until it happened.

Last summer, in an effort to cram as much hay into the barn as possible, my husband, Mark, and I filled two of our three horse stalls with hay. It seemed like a great idea at the time.… Continue reading

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What's that smell? A white striped tale of critters in the barn

By Kim Lemmon, OCJ managing editor

In 2011, the local critters declared war on Smokey Road Farm. For weeks, we saw skunks on a daily basis. Some of these sightings were surprises at very close range. Thirty pounds of cat food was consumed; our house and goat shed smelled like skunks, and generally it was risky to feed the goats and horses in the mornings.

As a lifetime horse owner, I realize unwanted critters are a part of country life and I try to do my best to keep all feed locked up tight, but these critters were wizards and were becoming unstoppably dangerous and costly.

My co-workers and my husband, Mark, were starting to think I was crazier than normal because all I talked about was my fear of meeting skunks in the barn. They kind of thought I was exaggerating the situation.

One afternoon, I made Mark take his gun out to the goat hay shed because it smelled terrible and I was certain I had seen a skunk tail dart back into the handful of hay bales in the shed, but by the time Mark arrived at the shed, nothing was visible and he wasn’t moving hay.… Continue reading

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What’s that smell? A white striped tale of critters in the barn

By Kim Lemmon, OCJ managing editor

In 2011, the local critters declared war on Smokey Road Farm. For weeks, we saw skunks on a daily basis. Some of these sightings were surprises at very close range. Thirty pounds of cat food was consumed; our house and goat shed smelled like skunks, and generally it was risky to feed the goats and horses in the mornings.

As a lifetime horse owner, I realize unwanted critters are a part of country life and I try to do my best to keep all feed locked up tight, but these critters were wizards and were becoming unstoppably dangerous and costly.

My co-workers and my husband, Mark, were starting to think I was crazier than normal because all I talked about was my fear of meeting skunks in the barn. They kind of thought I was exaggerating the situation.

One afternoon, I made Mark take his gun out to the goat hay shed because it smelled terrible and I was certain I had seen a skunk tail dart back into the handful of hay bales in the shed, but by the time Mark arrived at the shed, nothing was visible and he wasn’t moving hay.… Continue reading

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Rabies in Ohio annual summary

By Zoonotic Disease Program, Bureau of Infectious Diseases, Ohio Department of Health

In Ohio, there are three rabies variants circulating among our wildlife: bat, skunk and raccoon.

The north central skunk-rabies variant has been present in Ohio for decades. Raccoon-rabies variant (RRV) first moved into Ohio in the late 1990s and is localized to north and eastern Ohio. Bat rabies can be found anywhere in the state; it is sporadic and geographically disbursed since bats fly and migrate. Each variant prefers a specific animal reservoir, but all variants can infect humans and other mammals.

For example, a skunk with RRV can cause rabies in a human, dog, cat, horse, goat, etc.

Infection with any variant of the rabies virus affects the nervous system of mammals, and the disease is usually fatal. It is transmitted when saliva from an infected animal comes in contact with an open wound or mucous membrane.

Taking weeks to months, the virus travels to the brain where it causes progressively severe symptoms that may include anxiety, restlessness, confusion, agitation, lack of coordination, difficulty swallowing, seizures and death.… Continue reading

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Horse Sense: Walking in a judge's shoes

By Kim Lemmon, Managing Editor for Ohio’s Country Journal

As some of you may know, I have been a 4-H horse judge for about a dozen years. In the beginning, I judged about 12 shows a year. I currently judge three or four.

I became a judge because I wanted to ensure that horse shows were run fairly and that exhibitors were treated with respect. I also needed the money to supplement my horse habits.

As a seasoned 4-H horse judge, I realize that no matter what I do, I cannot make all horse shows run completely fairly. I cannot change the weather, the state or county rules, the show committee, or any number of other things that can affect the way a show runs, but I can give the best of myself during the time I am at the show. Faced with this reality I now judge for fun and to help the exhibitors and show committees, and yes to buy hay for my horses.… Continue reading

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Horse Sense: Walking in a judge’s shoes

By Kim Lemmon, Managing Editor for Ohio’s Country Journal

As some of you may know, I have been a 4-H horse judge for about a dozen years. In the beginning, I judged about 12 shows a year. I currently judge three or four.

I became a judge because I wanted to ensure that horse shows were run fairly and that exhibitors were treated with respect. I also needed the money to supplement my horse habits.

As a seasoned 4-H horse judge, I realize that no matter what I do, I cannot make all horse shows run completely fairly. I cannot change the weather, the state or county rules, the show committee, or any number of other things that can affect the way a show runs, but I can give the best of myself during the time I am at the show. Faced with this reality I now judge for fun and to help the exhibitors and show committees, and yes to buy hay for my horses.… Continue reading

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Tips for showing your horse

Horse judge Kim Lemmon offers some specific tips to ponder this winter in preparation for next summer’s horse shows.

Showmanship

Please remember that my first chance to meet you and your horse is during the showmanship classes. When you lead your horse in to start your pattern, make sure your clothes are clean and neat and that your horse is banded or braided, neatly clipped and sparkling clean from head to toe.

In 4-H showmanship classes, it doesn’t matter if you have the prettiest or the most ugly horse on the grounds as long as the horse and its exhibitor are neatly and cleanly presented. The scoring system for Showmanship in Ohio 4-H horse shows is: Condition of the horse, up to 10 points; Trimming & Braiding/Banding, up to 10 points; Grooming of the horse, up to 10 points; Appearance of tack & exhibitor, up to 10 points; Showing animal in ring, up to 60 points.… Continue reading

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The Christmas pony

By Kirby Hidy

 

I was about 4 years old when I sat on my first horse. Mom and Dad took my brother and me to a local rodeo and horse show. An uncle and several other local cowboys and cowgirls competed in various events from rough stock to wild cow milking (my uncle’s event) to various pleasure horse and youth classes.

As my family and I walked around the grounds, I was fascinated by the horses and, as far as I was concerned, REAL LIVE COWBOYS! Even at 4 years old I was quite a fan of Roy Rogers, Gene Autry and the myriad of TV Westerns that were on the air in the 1950s.

Among the contestants were local friends, Virgil and Nellie Hardman. Virg’ was a roper and Nellie, as I recall, showed horses in a “pleasure” class. When we saw them, Mom and Dad stopped for a chat, which gave my brother and me a chance to get up close and quietly pet the horse.… Continue reading

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Ronald Reagan was right!

By Kirby Hidy, Ohio’s Country Journal

“The outside of a horse is good for the inside of a man.” Former President Ronald Reagan has been credited with that statement, and on a recent weekend, I came to believe it to be true.

Had you asked me about trail riding 20 years ago, I probably would have “Harrumphed,” allowing that I could think of few things more boring than spending an afternoon looking at the behind of the horse in front of me. That attitude helped immerse me into the world of cutting horses — a passion that consumed me for nearly two decades.

Jump ahead 20 years. I moved back to Ohio after living nearly 13 years in Texas and quickly renewed several old friendships. Among them, a former classmate who kept encouraging me to join her, her husband and a group of their friends on the many weekend trail rides they took.… Continue reading

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The unthrifty horse

By: Phil Dilts, DVM

It’s now officially fall, which is my favorite time of year. The only bad thing about fall is it means winter is getting close. Winter is when horses that have difficulty holding their weight typically lose their body condition. This happens for a variety of reasons. Pasture is gone or nearly gone, and horses use more energy maintaining their body temperature. The purpose of this article is to lay out a systematic troubleshooting guide to help owners manage the unthrifty horse.

The first, and often overlooked treatment, is to feed the horse more. I know you’re thinking “Of course you would feed them more. Who wouldn’t do that.” But, it’s not quite that simple. When you have four horses of basically the same type and you are feeding them all the same and three are getting fat and one is losing weight, it’s rational to think feed is not the issue.… Continue reading

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Winterize your horse

By Katie Young, equine nutritionist, Purina Mills, LLC

Now that winter is approaching and temperatures are dropping, horse owners must consider winterizing their horses. During the cold season, owners must make sure their animals receive proper feed, water and shelter to stay healthy and comfortable.

Feeding

Many horse owners believe that when the weather is cold, horses need to be fed rations containing more corn, because they think of corn as a “heating feed.” However, corn and other cereal grains do not cause the horse to become warmer; they simply provide more energy (calories). Hay, which contains more fiber than grain, provides more of a “warming effect” internally as more heat is released during digestion of fiber than grain starches. Therefore, horses are better able to maintain body heat if adequate hay is provided in the diet.

Good quality hay is important during cooler weather when pasture grasses are short or not growing.… Continue reading

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Update on Ike the rotten mini horse

After chasing Ike, my miniature horse, through the neighborhood a total of three times this spring, things started to settle down. It stopped raining and Ike and his brother, Mike, received regular turn-out, and Ike turned into quite the gentleman.
I talked my husband, Mark, and my parents, Ed and Bonnie Chatfield, into helping me show Ike and Mike at the Hartford Independent Fair. The boys behaved beautifully in halter; Ike competed in the single cart, and I drove the team in the wagon class. We placed well and everyone had a great time. Below are some photos and a video from the Hartford Independent Fair.

I was really looking forward to the Morrow County Fair, which was just a few weeks away. On Wednesday of the Morrow County Fair, I decided I should practice the single cart with Ike before the hitch show the next day. My dad helped me hook Ike to the cart, and Ike and I went for a practice drive in the arena.… Continue reading

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Julie and the crop duster

On a beautiful Saturday morning in August, I was vacuuming the inside of our pickup truck and enjoying watching our draft mare, Julie, graze in a pasture near the garage and driveway. It was a peaceful and quite morning, and it wasn’t very hot, so I was enjoying myself and Julie was content because there weren’t a lot of flies for a change.

I turned off the vacuum and starting cleaning the inside of the truck with a rag when I heard a very loud noise approaching from behind me. The noise got louder and louder, and I turned around in alarm to find an airplane and 2,000 pounds of horseflesh headed right toward me. Julie was barreling toward the electric fence and me as the airplane streaked by overhead.

Now, I know what a crop duster is, but when you aren’t expecting them and their first trip by is right over your head, and your horse is storming toward you at full speed, it can be a little overwhelming.… Continue reading

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Feeding management guidelines for horses

By Katie Young, Ph.D., consulting equine nutritionist, Purina Mills, LLC

 

Feeding horses correctly and safely often seems complicated because they are unique in the livestock world and cannot be fed the same way as cattle, hogs, sheep or other livestock species. However, following a few guidelines will go a long way toward ensuring your horse’s nutrient requirements are met without increasing the risk of digestive disturbances that seem to plague many horses.

 

Feed horses according to lifestyle.

Horses require different amounts of nutrients according to their lifestyle. Horse owners must ensure that each horse receives a total diet that meets its specific needs.

 

How much feed?

In order to feed the correct amount, horse owners must know the horse’s body weight. To determine body weight, one can use a livestock scale, a weight tape (available from your Purina dealer) or the following equation:

 

BW (pounds) = (Heart girth x Heart girth x Body length) divided by 330.… Continue reading

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