Crops



Jim Herring, Wyandot County, July 9

“We had 80-plus mile an hour winds, a little bit of rain and a lot of tree damage on June 29. There were a lot of farm machine sheds and grain systems in the area that got damage. We didn’t have any structural damage. We lost power for 28 hours, but there were people without power for several days. It rained seven or eight tenths. The corn was probably too short to blow over.

“Corn is in spotty pollination. The crop is pretty darn short. That rain we got helped for a day and that is about it. I think we’re going downhill fast with yields. I think that anybody who is still talking about good corn yields in this area is either dreaming or not looking too closely. All of the early corn is well under way with pollination. The later planted corn is not there yet. I think that it will be there in the next week or so.… Continue reading

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Ohio's Crop Progress – July 9th, 2012

OHIO CROP WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS

The average temperature for the State was 82.4 degrees, 10.0 degrees above normal for the week ending Sunday, July 8, 2012. Precipitation averaged 0.63 inches, 0.15 inches below normal. There were 174 modified growing degree days, 21 days above normal.

Reporters rated 6.1 days suitable for fieldwork during the seven-day period ending Friday, July 6, 2012. Topsoil moisture was rated 49 percent very short, 39 percent short, 12 percent adequate, and 0 percent surplus.

FIELD ACTIVITIES AND CROP PROGRESS WEEK ENDING SUNDAY JULY 8th, 2012

Conditions throughout the state are hot and dry. The heat and dry weather during the last number of weeks has continued to put significant stress on both crops and livestock. Field activities for the week were baling hay and harvesting wheat and oats.

As of Sunday July 8th, 41 percent of corn was silked (tasseled), which was 40 percent ahead of last year and 29 percent ahead of the five-year average.… Continue reading

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Ohio’s Crop Progress – July 9th, 2012

OHIO CROP WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS

The average temperature for the State was 82.4 degrees, 10.0 degrees above normal for the week ending Sunday, July 8, 2012. Precipitation averaged 0.63 inches, 0.15 inches below normal. There were 174 modified growing degree days, 21 days above normal.

Reporters rated 6.1 days suitable for fieldwork during the seven-day period ending Friday, July 6, 2012. Topsoil moisture was rated 49 percent very short, 39 percent short, 12 percent adequate, and 0 percent surplus.

FIELD ACTIVITIES AND CROP PROGRESS WEEK ENDING SUNDAY JULY 8th, 2012

Conditions throughout the state are hot and dry. The heat and dry weather during the last number of weeks has continued to put significant stress on both crops and livestock. Field activities for the week were baling hay and harvesting wheat and oats.

As of Sunday July 8th, 41 percent of corn was silked (tasseled), which was 40 percent ahead of last year and 29 percent ahead of the five-year average.… Continue reading

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Assessing corn after a tough early growing season

By Jeff Rectenwald, Technical Agronomist for Monsanto

Recent strong storms in Ohio brought high winds and some much needed rainfall in several parts of the state. The rainfall was critical in many parts of Ohio where the corn and soybeans were showing strong signs of drought and heat stress. Since April 1, many parts of Ohio have received 5 to 10 inches of rainfall, which is 3 to 4 inches below the 5-year average. Growing Degree Days (GDD’s) for the same period have accumulated 1,200 to 1,300 units, which is 175 t0 200 GDD’s ahead of normal. We use the GDD’s to track the overall progress of corn development. I like to consult the numbers weekly to track the progress of rainfall and temperature in the state. You can also track these at the Ohio page on the National Agricultural Statistics Service website.

 

Why is my corn short?

Corn planted earlier in the season tends to be shorter than later planted corn because the daylength is shorter April 1 compared to May 1.

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SCI to offer EverGol Energy fungicide

Seed Consultants, Inc. will offer EverGol Energy fungicide seed treatment on Supreme EXbrand soybean varieties for the 2013 growing season.

EverGol Energy fungicide seed treatment from Bayer CropScience will allow Seed Consultants’ customers access to a state-of-the-art seed treatment fungicide. This new seed treatment can provide long-lasting protection against Rhizoctonia as well as other fungal diseases.

“EverGolEnergy fungicide seed treatment will offer our customers increased seed treatment choices as well as improved protection against disease, ultimately providing enhanced crop growth and early season vigor,” said Matt Hutcheson, Product Manager for Seed Consultants.

This improved early season growth will allow for more efficient use of water and nutrients by soybean plants. EverGol Energy fungicide seed treatment provides protection against a broad spectrum of early season diseases through multiple modes of action, while incorporating a new mode of action. The protection offered by this next generation technology contributes to uniform stand establishment and seedling development under disease pressure.… Continue reading

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Drought intensifies nematode damage

The drought is intensifying nematode damage in farm fields, said a Purdue Extension nematologist. The needle nematode, soybean cyst nematode and lance nematode all are causing more problems for grain farmers in a year when crops already are stressed by extreme heat and lack of rain. Jamal Faghihi explained that nematodes, microscopic roundworms, can be found in fields every year, but the damage is worse during a drought season.

“The severity of symptoms shows because of the stress in plants,” he said. Faghihi stressed that nematodes and their damage will be found in patches in the fields. “They’re not going to be uniformly distributed all over the field,” he said.

Farmers should know if they are having nematode problems at this point in the summer.

“They’ve always been there if you looked hard enough,” Faghihi said. “Now, you can’t miss it.”

The needle nematode exclusively feeds on corn and grasses and is found in sandy soils.… Continue reading

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March 22nd corn just misses storm damage {July 3rd update}

On April 10, 2012 we reported on some of the first corn to come up in Ohio. It was planted on March 22, 2012 in Fayette County. We are going to follow that field along through to harvest. See the field’s complete progress from March 22nd up until now.

We checked in on the March 22 corn field this week after the storms that rolled through over the weekend. As you can see the field fared good considering just 8 miles away in Bloomingburg there was considerable hail damage to the crops there.

 


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NCGA sets new membership record

The National Corn Growers Association reached a new record high number of members, 37,447, at the end of June. The previous record of 37,231 was set in March 2012.

“The support for our work that this record demonstrates is inspiring,” said NCGA President Garry Niemeyer. “Increased membership makes it obvious that farmers value the activities and programs run by NCGA leadership and staff.  Now, we need to turn that membership into grassroots action that gets us to where we want to be as an industry.”

NCGA membership offers many benefits, including leadership opportunities, academic scholarships and discounts.  Members play an active role in organizational leadership by shaping the direction of activities and influencing public policy that affects all farmers.  Additionally, membership provides valuable discounts with companies such as Office Depot, Dell, Cabela’s, Ford and Enterprise, and special access to official NASCAR information, including discounted tickets and merchandise.

In addition to representing individual members, NCGA is part of a federation in cooperation with many state-level grower associations and checkoff boards. … Continue reading

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Corn supply and demand uncertain

July 2012 corn futures are currently trading about $1 below the peak reached in August 2011 but $1.40 above the low reached a month ago. December 2012 futures are trading $1.50 above the low of June 15, 2012, and within 15 cents of the high reached on August 31, 2011, said a University of Illinois agricultural economist.

“Much of the recent strength in corn prices has been associated with very hot, dry conditions in the central and eastern Corn Belt and indications that yield prospects have been reduced substantially in those areas,” said Darrel Good.

As much of the crop in the Corn Belt has or soon will enter the reproductive stage, the market will continue to try to determine production prospects. Moreover, the market is assessing the likely strength of demand to determine what price is needed to balance potential supply with likely consumption, he noted.

“On the demand side, corn exports continue to lag behind the pace needed to reach the USDA projection of 1.65 billion bushels for the current marketing year.… Continue reading

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Marketing strategies for a dry 2012

Drought conditions could hit farmers in the pocketbook in more ways than one, Purdue Extension agricultural economist Chris Hurt said.

Not only could water-starved corn and soybean crops produce smaller yields and cut into farmers’ revenues, but they also could force some growers who signed future delivery contracts with grain buyers to buy back some bushels they are unable to supply, Hurt said.

“We’ve been hearing of producers calling their grain managers and talking with them about the possibilities of dealing with these yield reductions,” Hurt said. “Right now it’s hard to say what will happen because nobody knows where grain prices are going to go.”

With some parts of the Eastern Corn Belt now nearing a month without significant rainfall and the critical pollination phase of corn either already started or about to begin, large crop losses appear likely for some farmers. Those losses would be especially painful for farmers who sold a large percentage of their anticipated corn crop this spring in forward cash contracts.… Continue reading

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There is little to do but hope for rain

By Matt Reese

The dry weather and heat are taking a heavy toll on crop conditions around the state.Just last week, things were grim on Chad Kemp’s Preble County farm.

“Our corn is four to five feet tall. The stands look great. The plants are there but they are in the pineapple stage curling up with the heat and no water,” said Chad Kemp, who farms in Preble County. “Soybeans never got a good start this year. They don’t have much height. The roots have gotten down far enough that they are starting to grow a little. Some of the smaller beans are flipping their leaves over and a lot of the stands came up unevenly.”

With just over half an inch of rain in the last month and a half, the roughy 1.5 inches of rain on the farm this weekend made a tremendous difference.

“We’re very concerned. It was getting to be pretty extreme,” Kemp said.… Continue reading

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On Target Application Academy coming to Ohio

As advanced crop protection products and spray technologies come to market — and weed resistance continues to challenge growers across the country — it’s simple to say that today’s weed management environment is becoming more complex.

Developed by Bob Wolf, Ph.D., of Wolf Consulting and Research, TeeJet Technologies and BASF, with insight from a grower roundtable, the On Target Application Academy is a one-of-a-kind educational opportunity to provide growers extensive hands-on training for better awareness of herbicide application best practices.

“State certification courses and exams are important steps in ensuring proper herbicide application,” Wolf said. “The On Target Application Academy supplements these efforts, offering more detail around best management practices and factors that affect proper application.”

The On Target Application Academy educates growers on new application technologies, plant biology and advancements in new product chemistries to help them achieve the most effective and sustainable weed control possible — and to help mitigate off target applications, which is a continuous area of focus for the agricultural industry.… Continue reading

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Acreage and Grain Stocks reports move markets

By Doug Tenney, Leist Mercantile

Today was a huge report by USDA. Most certainly producers and traders are viewing it with much trepidation. New this month we are seeing trading at the CME in live mode while the USDA reports are released. The first test was earlier this month with the supply and demand report. Many expected trading to be brisk with a huge range within minutes of the 8:30 release. In the past 10 days many have suggested that limit up or limit down for corn was a huge possibility.

The report this morning was an acres report and grain stocks as of June 1. Corn acres were estimated at 96.4 million acres while soybean acres were pegged at 76.1 million acres.

June 1st corn stocks were estimated to be 3.138 billion bushels, soybean stocks were 667 million bushels.

In trading at 8:40 December corn was up 19 cents with November soybeans up 14 cents.… Continue reading

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Adoption of advanced techniques could propel crop improvement

Scientists could take greater strides toward crop improvement if there were wider adoption of advanced techniques used to understand the mechanisms that allow plants to adapt to their environments, current and former Purdue University researchers said.

In a perspective for the journal Science, Brian Dilkes, a Purdue assistant professor of genetics, and Ivan Baxter, a research computational biologist for the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service, argue that today’s technology could allow scientists to match physiological and genetic characteristics of plants with the soil characteristics that promote or inhibit their growth. Making those connections could reduce the time necessary to improve plants that are coping with changing environmental and climatic conditions.

“Evolution has solved the problems that we face in terms of adapting plants to grow in a multitude of environments,” Dilkes said. “If we understand these processes, we’ll be able to apply that knowledge to maintaining diversity in natural systems and improving and maintaining crop yield.”… Continue reading

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Drought drying up hopes of high corn yields in 2012

By Matt Reese

The rain had to stop sometime. After a year of record setting rainfall amounts that plagued crop producers trying to get any fieldwork done, the faucet shut off in the early growing season this spring. The welcomed dry conditions allowed for a great start to the season, but have since turned into a source of growing concern.

“The season started out really well. We didn’t start as early as a lot of people in the neighborhood. We got started around April 14 and finished corn by the 24th,” said Chad Kemp, who farms in Preble County. “We started planting soybeans on April 30 and got done on May 15. Everything went in really well and we got a great start with everything. Since the planting season ended on May 15, though, we’ve only gotten about .6-inch of rain. The rains have come .2, .2, .1, and a half a tenth.… Continue reading

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Dry weather driving markets

By Matt Reese

The dry conditions stretching across the Corn Belt have the attention of increasingly nervous markets as corn pollination progresses. Though it seems that the drought is worse in the Eastern Corn Belt, conditions are on the dry side in many areas across the country.

“Out west is not as bad as it is here,” said Matt Roberts, an Ohio State University agricultural economist. “But in Illinois you start to see the really dry conditions showing up. In a year like this we get spot rains, in a normal year we get dry spots.”

In looking at the bigger picture of supply and demand, the increasing possibility of another year of below trend line yields in 2012 is driving the markets.

“Historically, each year there is the same probability of high or low yields,” Roberts said. “We don’t tend to see repeated bad or good years, but this looks like it could be the first time in 30 or 40 years that we’ve seen three years in a row with below trend line national yields.… Continue reading

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Hot, dry weather adding challenges to weed control

While the extended hot, dry weather in Ohio recently might mean that weeds aren’t growing as fast as they would in more moist conditions, the weather can still make weed management more challenging for corn and soybean growers, an Ohio State University Extension weed specialist says.

The abnormally dry conditions affect the germination, growth, hardiness and competitive ability of weeds, but they also complicate weed control efforts, Mark Loux said.

“The biggest thing that happens to weeds when the weather conditions continue to be hot and dry is that the weeds get tougher to control,” he said. “Under good moisture, weeds tend to be more sensitive to herbicides.

“Under extended dry conditions, weeds grow more slowly and also develop thicker cuticles on the leaf surfaces, which has the overall effect of reducing herbicide movement into and throughout the plant.”

While growers often wonder if they should wait for rain to treat weeds with herbicides, Loux said, the most important thing is to make sure they select the right herbicide treatment for the weeds they are trying to control.… Continue reading

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Do not tear up dying crops without taking proper measures

By Matt Reese

There are some pockets of farmland around the state that have gotten very little rain and crops are withering in the heat. With little relief in sight for the situation of rapidly deteriorating crop condition, some farmers are considering tearing their crops out.

“The people tearing up crops are not widespread at this point. It is in isolated situations where it was planted into dry dirt and hasn’t come up,” said Greg Owens, with Williamson Insurance Agency. “There hasn’t been enough precipitation to justifiy tearing up corn and replanting beans. Guys do not want to look at these tough fields of corn for the rest of the summer, but at this point financially it may actually be their option to let the crop grow to maturity. In these isolated instances farmers should turn in a claim and meet with their adjuster to determine their best options in these tougher fields.… Continue reading

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Rainfall amounts are shaping the markets

By Doug Tenney, Leist Mercantile

The first two weeks of June were extremely disappointing days of no rain for Ohio producers. Rainfall amounts continued to be drastically varied across the state. While many desired a good soaking rain, it just did not happen. Central Ohio received just a smattering of rain during the second week of June with rainfall just amounting to .1 to .4 inch. Meanwhile, rainfall in the western Midwest and stretching across the northern cornbelt states of South Dakota and Minnesota was a common occurrence more than once a week. Rain totals were often one inch or more. It was extremely frustrating as Ohio producers not only watched their yield potential shrink, but watched in utter shock as grain prices dropped severely for days on end.

The USDA supply and demand report pegged the 2012 U.S. corn yield at 166 bushels per acre. This number was unchanged from the previous report.… Continue reading

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