Crops



Jim Herring-June 11, 2012

“We’re getting a little bit of rain. Not a lot, but I’ll take it. It started raining before daylight this morning. It is just a gentle rain, which is enough to perk things up. I’ll take what I can get right now because there is not a lot coming in behind this. We’ve gotten a half an inch in the last two weeks.

“The corn is starting to show stress, but the stands are pretty good. The beans were in deep enough and they came in well, but now the crops are showing stress. So far we’ve gotten maybe a tenth.

“In this area there are a lot of spotty stands. Beans haven’t even come up yet in some fields. They didn’t get planted deep enough or there wasn’t enough moisture to bring them. There is some uneven corn, but it got in a little earlier and got a little more moisture to work with.… Continue reading

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Mark Dowden-June 11, 2012

“We’re getting some rain. It is just what we needed. We got anywhere from .8 to 1.8 inches on our different farms in the last 2 weeks. We were pretty dry until then. The crops really responded to that, but we were due for another shot.

“I don’t think there is much corn that is behind around here. There will be some beans behind that got planted late. The corn all came up about the same time and emergence was pretty even. All of the sidedressing is done around here. The beans have been post- sprayed and are in pretty good shape, other than the last planted beans in the area that are struggling.

“It wouldn’t surprise me if we didn’t try some wheat harvest in a couple of weeks. I think it is at least 10 days or two weeks ahead of normal. I am sure that most wheat acres will get double-cropped unless they need to put manure on or something.… Continue reading

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Ohio’s Crop Progress – June 11th, 2012

OHIO CROP WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS

The average temperature for the State was 65.2 degrees, 1.7 degrees below normal for the week ending Sunday, June 10, 2012. Precipitation averaged 0.06 inches, 0.80 inches below normal. There were 98 modified growing degree days, 22 days below normal.

Reporters rated 6.3 days suitable for fieldwork during the seven-day period ending Friday, June 8, 2012. Topsoil moisture was rated 15 percent very short, 41 percent short, 42 percent adequate, and 2 percent surplus.

FIELD ACTIVITIES AND CROP PROGRESS WEEK ENDING SUNDAY June 10th, 2012

The state continues to experience warm and dry conditions. The heat is putting significant stress on livestock, corn and soybeans. Field activities included side-dressing corn with nitrogen, spraying herbicides, and baling hay. Soybean emergence has been slow due to dry weather and some producers have replanted. Insect infestation has been a problem in alfalfa fields.

As of Sunday June 10th, 95 percent of soybeans were emerged, compared to 23 percent last year and 66 percent for the five-year average.… Continue reading

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Ohio's Crop Progress – June 11th, 2012

OHIO CROP WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS

The average temperature for the State was 65.2 degrees, 1.7 degrees below normal for the week ending Sunday, June 10, 2012. Precipitation averaged 0.06 inches, 0.80 inches below normal. There were 98 modified growing degree days, 22 days below normal.

Reporters rated 6.3 days suitable for fieldwork during the seven-day period ending Friday, June 8, 2012. Topsoil moisture was rated 15 percent very short, 41 percent short, 42 percent adequate, and 2 percent surplus.

FIELD ACTIVITIES AND CROP PROGRESS WEEK ENDING SUNDAY June 10th, 2012

The state continues to experience warm and dry conditions. The heat is putting significant stress on livestock, corn and soybeans. Field activities included side-dressing corn with nitrogen, spraying herbicides, and baling hay. Soybean emergence has been slow due to dry weather and some producers have replanted. Insect infestation has been a problem in alfalfa fields.

As of Sunday June 10th, 95 percent of soybeans were emerged, compared to 23 percent last year and 66 percent for the five-year average.… Continue reading

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Foliar fungicides in corn

By Kirk Reese, Agronomy Research Manager for DuPont/Pioneer

The use of foliar fungicides in corn production has become a more common practice in recent years. This is largely due to the increased value of the crop and the subsequent interest in protecting or enhancing grain or forage yield. There are factors where the value of corn yield can be enhanced by a foliar fungicide application, which we will discuss in this agronomy update.

During years 2007 to 2011, 475 on-farm trials conducted by Pioneer have shown an average 7-bushel grain yield increase in the presence of a foliar fungicide compared to an untreated check when applied between tassel emergence and brown silk. The economic benefit, or the point where the value of the yield increase was greater than the cost of the fungicide application, occurred 80% of the time when calculated at a corn commodity price of $4 per bushel and application cost of $28 per acre.… Continue reading

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Ohio Certified Crop Adviser Program exams in August

The next Ohio Certified Crop Adviser (CCA) Program exam — which is required to become a CCA — is Friday, August 3 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Ohio Department of Agriculture in Reynoldsburg. The International Exam will take place from 9 a.m. — noon, followed by the Tri-State Exam from 1–3 p.m.

The exam registration deadline is June 22, 2012; registrations received after June 22 will not be processed.

There are two exams, the International Exam with 180 multiple choices questions and 20 constructed response questions, and the Tri-State Exam with 100 multiple-choice questions. Both exams are timed — three hours for the International Exam and two hours for the Tri-State Exam. The exams cover four performance objective areas:

  • Nutrient Management
  • Soil & Water Management
  • Crop Management
  • Pest Management

The total cost of the exam is $200 ($150 for the International Exam, and $50 for the Tri-State Exam).… Continue reading

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Uneven corn a growing concern

By Matt Reese

Last year’s very late start to the planting season left many farmers praying for the rain to stop. This year there was likely some praying for rain after a very early start followed by hot, dry weather. These were certainly not the only differences in what has proven to be two of the most wildly divergent back-to-back planting seasons in recent memory.

The long window of opportunity for planting presented a very different start to 2012 that will inevitably lead to some very different challenges this season. As of Sunday June 3, Ohio corn was 97% emerged, compared to 18% last year and 68% for the five-year average. In addition, 99% of the intended soybean crop was planted, compared to 21% last year and 72% for the five-year average. And, maybe the biggest difference this year, was the winter wheat crop with 45% turning color compared to 4% for both last year and the five-year average.… Continue reading

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Southeastern Ohio Hay Day

 

Equipment dealers from around eastern Ohio will demonstrate the latest in forage harvesting and forage handling machinery at Southeastern Ohio Hay Day.

 

The field day will be June 21, 4-8:30 p.m. at the Eastern Agricultural Research Station, 16870 Township Road 126, Caldwell. The station is part of the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC).

 

The public is invited to this free event to watch live demonstrations and talk with equipment personnel.

 

Registration and access to field equipment displays begins at 4 p.m., with demonstrations starting at 5 p.m. Company representatives will be on hand to demonstrate and discuss the various equipment lines.

 

For more information, contact Clif Little, Ohio State University Extension educator, at 740-489-5300 or 740-732-5681, or visit the Guernsey County office of OSU Extension website at http://guernsey.osu.edu and click on “Events.”


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Ohio Soybean Council to elect trustees

The Ohio Soybean Council (OSC) Board of Trustee elections will be held in five districts this summer. Districts up for election include:

  • District 1 – Defiance, Fulton, Henry and Williams Counties
  • District 2 – Lucas, Ottawa, Sandusky and Wood Counties
  • District 5 – Hancock and Putnam Counties
  • District 9 – Delaware, Marion, Morrow and Union Counties
  • District 13 – Adams, Brown, Butler, Clermont, Clinton, Fayette, Hamilton, Highland and Warren Counties

To be eligible for election to OSC, you must live in a county in the districts listed, be a soybean producer engaged in the growing of soybeans in the State of Ohio who owns or shares the ownership and risk of loss of such soybeans at any time during the three-year period immediately preceding November 15 of the current year.

Those eligible producers (spouses who jointly produce soybeans are considered to be a “family” and are considered to be one person) who have contributed to the soybean checkoff and have submitted a petition with the signatures of 15 eligible soybean producers who reside in the respective district shall be determined candidates for election.… Continue reading

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Corn planted March 22 is holding its own {June 6th update}

On April 10, 2012 we reported on some of the first corn to come up in Ohio. It was planted on March 22, 2012 in Fayette County. We are going to follow that field along through to harvest. See the field’s complete progress from March 22nd up until now.

By Matt Reese

Over the weekend, the March 22 field was getting some attention because it was noticeably shorter than the surrounding fields. A couple days later a visit with a camera was made to the field that had somehow caught up with the surrounding corn. The photos taken on June 5 show that the corn is generally looking pretty good.

After a fast start, much of the corn in the region, and around Ohio, is starting to slow down a little.

“From what I have seen, we’re not getting the heat units we need right now because of these cold nights and we’re not getting out of the 70s during the day.… Continue reading

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Leafhoppers may be making an early appearance

The near-record warm winter this year has not only brought alfalfa to an earlier-than-usual first cutting, it’s also caused some insects, such as potato leafhopper, to appear earlier than normal, said an Ohio State University Extension entomologist.

As a result, growers should begin scouting for the insect when alfalfa regrowth reaches sufficient height for sweep-net sampling, said Ron Hammond, who also has an appointment with the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center.

The problem is that the potato leafhopper, which migrates to northern states from Gulf Coast states, can cause significant loss for alfalfa growers.

“We’re already getting reports of fields having to be to be treated for potato leafhoppers, causing growers a significant economic impact,” Hammond said. “These pests can result in stunted alfalfa plants or yellow plants, which is caused by leafhopper burn. That results in the yellowing of the leaves and could cause significant yield loss and impact the plant’s nutritional value.”… Continue reading

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Soybean prices all over the board

The wide soybean price swings reflect ever-changing supply-and-demand expectations, according to a University of Illinois agricultural economist.

“November 2012 soybean futures reached a high of $14 in September 2011, declined to about $11.20 in December 2011, rebounded to almost $14 in early April and again in early May 2012, and traded to a low of $12.45 in the current trading session,” Darrel Good said. “Much of the strength in soybean prices during the first three months of this year reflected deteriorating production prospects in South America.

“The USDA currently projects production in five South American countries at 4.237 billion bushels, 779 million bushels (15.5%) smaller than the 2011 harvest and 833 million bushels (16.4%) smaller than the December 2011 forecast. Some believe the crop to be even smaller.”

Much of the price weakness over the past few weeks reflects growing concerns about the U.S. and world economic and financial conditions and the negative implications for commodity demand.… Continue reading

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Hot, dry weather led to uneven emergence

Corn growers finding marginal stands in their corn fields might be seeing the effects of record rainfall in 2011, a mild winter in 2012 and continued hot, dry weather — all of which potentially are contributing to problems with corn emergence.

Multiple northern Ohio cornfields have had fair to poor stands, according to Steve Prochaska, an Ohio State University Extension educator in north-central Ohio, and member of the university’s Agronomic Crops Team. Stands in those fields ranged from 14,000 to greater than 28,000 plants per acre, he said, noting that the losses are variable and are likely related to the record rainfall last year, combined with the mild winter and early, hot spring the region has experienced in recent months.

“Surface crusting and soil compaction were evident in the fields, as well as soil compaction zone about 2 to 4 inches from the surface,” Prochaska said. “Likewise, corn seminal roots of emerged plants were observed growing laterally along the top of the compaction zone.… Continue reading

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Should you bale your straw?

By Chris Zoller, Extension educator (ANR in Tuscarawas County); Brian Roe, AEDE Extension specialist and Bruce Clevenger, Extension educator (ANR, Defiance County)

Wheat straw is in high demand across all of Ohio for a variety of reasons, including fewer acres devoted to wheat production, its use in reclamation of gas and oil well drilling sites, and fields being planted to soybeans following wheat harvest without the straw being baled. Reports of higher than normal prices per bale are found across the state. The Farmerstown, Ohio, Auction on May 15 reported large square bales of straw selling for $165 per ton and small square bales bringing $180 per ton, while per-ton prices over the past two months have averaged $167 in central Pennsylvania and $140 in central Illinois. Further analysis of the central Pennsylvania auction prices reveals that these strong prices for straw have persisted for the past two years and are significantly higher than 2010 prices.… Continue reading

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Brazil poised for big corn crop

The United States and Brazil are both positioning themselves for a record setting corn harvest, making for an exceptionally competitive dynamic in the global corn market. Earlier concerns of weather related damage to Brazil’s summer crop have been eliminated. Additionally, Brazil is approaching the completion of an all-time high second season corn crop planting. It should be noted that Brazil routinely harvests two corn crops, however final acreage intentions remain unclear, as a recent softening of domestic corn prices could decrease corn plantings.

Alfredo Navarro, a U.S. Grains Council representative based in Brazil, confirms that the Brazil summer crop harvest has in fact matched the anticipated volume of 36 million metric tons (1.4 billion bushels). Despite adverse planting conditions, Brazil is expecting an astounding 20% increase in corn plantings, year over year. A record 7.1 million hectares (17.5 million acres) are estimated to be devoted to second season corn, yielding another record setting 29 million tons (1.1 billion bushels).… Continue reading

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Columbia gets first U.S. grain after FTA implementation

The U.S. Grains Council‘s U.S., Colombia Free Trade Implementation Team witnessed the first shipment of U.S. grain being unloaded in Colombia after the implementation of the U.S., Colombia Free Trade Agreement (FTA) on May 15.

The Cargill shipment arrived at the port of Santa Maria May 30, containing 30,000 metric tons of U.S. grain: 9,900 tons of corn; 12,000 tons of wheat; 3,850 tons of distiller’s dried grains with solubles (DDGS); and 6,450 tons of corn gluten feed pellets.

“It was exciting to see the U.S. products being unloaded,” said Deb Keller, USGC Rest of the World Advisory Team leader who traveled with the group. “I particularly liked the fact that it wasn’t just corn. The United States is able to diversify its shipments to better meet customer’s import needs. This puts the United States at a significant market advantage. It means more vessels coming out the United States and more assurance of customer satisfaction — a win-win for everyone.”… Continue reading

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Rootless corn showing up in Ohio fields

By Matt Reese

Floppy corn — crop consultant Joe Nester has rarely seen it in nearly 40 years in northwest Ohio corn production, but it is showing up this year.

“The corn sprout hits the surface and sees sunlight and it initiates the crown root system about three quarters of an inch below where it first notices sunlight.

This spring we got dry and the soil really warmed up,” Nester said. “Some of the corn came up after sunset and it kept growing overnight. It was growing fast. It may grow a half-inch or three quarters of an inch overnight. The sun came up and it falsely initiated the crown roots right at the surface and this corn is really floppy. It looks like they sprayed it with 2,4-D or Dicamba.”

Extension specialists across the country, particularly further west in Iowa and Illinois, have noticed the same “rootless corn” and farmers in Ohio should be watching their fields for the problem.… Continue reading

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Assessing N applications

The early spring and accompanying early planting, together with last fall’s dry conditions in many areas, may present unique management challenges to growers planning nitrogen (N) applications. These conditions can mean nitrogen loss and impact corn yields.

“For a successful corn crop, it’s important to factor in the uncertainties of weather and the dynamic nature of the nitrogen cycle,” said John Shanahan, Pioneer agronomy research manager. “After all, a sound corn nitrogen plan sets the stage for a high-yielding crop.” Last fall’s dry soil conditions led to anhydrous ammonia applications on many of the acres in the Corn Belt. In the spring, excessive rain can threaten these soil nitrogen reserves and hinder resupply by ground equipment. Excessively dry conditions in the spring also can prevent applied nitrogen from moving from the point of application to the root zone of plants. Temperature and moisture conditions also can impact the amount of nitrogen mineralized from the organic matter fraction of soils.… Continue reading

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Dry conditions persist for much of Ohio’s corn

Yesterday, farmers across the sate watched the clouds closely for some crucial rain. Only some of them got it. Rainfall totals ranged from nothing to more than two inches from the much-anticipated cold front that swept through Ohio yesterday.

“Rainfall was scattered from the early week storm, but most places saw less than a half inch. Spotty totals up to an inch fell in small areas with thunderstorms,” said Jim Noel, with the NOAA/NWS/Climate Prediction Center in this week’s CORN Newsletter from OSU Extension. “A more widespread rainfall is expected late in the week, late Thursday into Friday. Most places will get 0.35 to 1-inch with isolated higher totals. Another system could bring a few showers during the weekend but they will be light. There will be yet another system early to mid-week next week. With normal rainfall for 2 weeks near 2 inches, most places will average near or a little below that the next few weeks.”… Continue reading

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