Crops



Ethanol rocks video contest

 

As the E15 ethanol fuel blend prepares for its national debut, the National Corn Growers Association calls on students to channel their “inner Spielberg” and submit entries in the Ethanol Rocks video contest.

 

“Today, we’re distributing Ethanol Rocks video contest application and rules packets online and to FFA chapters and members of the National Science Teachers Association,” said Chad Willis, chairman of NCGA’s Ethanol Committee. “Statistics and studies confirm that ethanol keeps the cost of gasoline down and reduces harmful emissions into the environment, and we’re looking for creative ways to tell ethanol’s great story. By giving American youth a creative platform, we hope to discover a wide variety of interesting perspectives on the benefits of ethanol.”

 

The contest is looking for short videos (2 minutes or less) from active high school and college students that highlight the benefits of ethanol fuel blends to the U.S. environment and economy.… Continue reading

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Cool temperatures have slowed early corn

Cool temperatures and frost have slowed development of corn for farmers who planted earlier this year than ever before, a Purdue Extension corn specialist says.

“Probably the best way to describe the general condition of the crop to date is that it is behaving like a crop that was planted in late March and early April,” said Bob Nielsen. “Many of the surviving fields are light green to almost yellow. Almost all of the fields are developing slowly relative to calendar time but are on schedule relative to the more typical cool April temperatures and the resulting slow accumulation of growing-degree days.”

Growing-degree days are a measure of heat accumulation to predict plant development rates. It takes about 115 GDDs for corn to emerge. In a typical Indiana March, GDDs would be almost zero. But because of the unusually warm air temperatures and subsequent warm soil temperatures, the average daily accumulation of soil temperature-based GDDs was about 8-12 per day in the central part of the state, Nielsen said.… Continue reading

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Wheat blast could be a threat to Ohio’s crop

University of Kentucky College of Agriculture soil scientist Lloyd Murdock recently found a new disease that could have important implication for Ohio wheat production.

Wheat blast was discovered on a single wheat head in May of 2011 at a University of Kentucky

Research and Education Center research plot in Princeton. No additional instances of the disease were found even after extensive scouting of the involved research plots and neighboring fields. It is likely, however, that additional infected heads existed but at levels too low to make detection possible.

Wheat blast is a disease that is recognized as an emerging threat worldwide. Caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae/Pyricularia grisea, the disease was first detected in southern Brazil in 1985 and has since become a problem in several of its neighboring countries in South America. Crop losses of 40% are common and cases of 100% loss have been reported. Currently, there are no commercially available resistant varieties and fungicidal programs targeting wheat blast have generally been ineffective.… Continue reading

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Research shows N efficiency improving in corn

Today’s hybrid corn varieties more efficiently use nitrogen to create more grain, according to 72 years of public-sector research data reviewed by Purdue University researchers.

Tony Vyn, a professor of agronomy, and doctoral student Ignacio Ciampitti looked at nitrogen use studies for corn from two periods — 1940-1990 and 1991-2011. They wanted to see whether increased yields were due to better nitrogen efficiency or whether new plants were simply given additional nitrogen to produce more grain.

“Corn production often faces the criticism from society that yields are only going up because of an increased dependency on nitrogen,” said Vyn, whose findings were published in the early online version of the journal Field Crops Research. “Although modern hybrids take up more total nitrogen per acre during the growing season than they did before, the amount of grain produced per pound of nitrogen accumulated in corn plants is substantially greater than it was for corn hybrids of earlier decades.… Continue reading

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CME new hours plans delayed

Because CME Group Inc. (CME) has not yet officially notified the Commodity Futures Trading Commission  (CFTC) of its plan to expand its grain futures trading hours, the new hours announced this week will not be able to be implemented on May 14 as planned.

A “self-certification” form must be submitted to the CFTC by the CME disclosing its plans to change hours. Once submitted, the change in hours can’t take effect for 10 business days.

 

 … Continue reading

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Custom farming rates in Ohio

By Barry Ward, Leader, Production Business Management, Ohio State University Extension, Department of Agricultural, Environmental and Development Economics

A large number of Ohio farmers hire machinery operations and other farm related work to be completed by others. This is often due to lack of proper equipment, lack of time or lack of expertise for a particular operation.  Many farm business owners do not own equipment for every possible job that they may encounter in the course of operating a farm and may, instead of purchasing the equipment needed, seek out someone with the proper tools necessary to complete the job. This farm work completed by others is often referred to as “custom farm work” or more simply “custom work.” A “custom rate” is the amount agreed upon by both parties to be paid by the custom work customer to the custom work provider.

The custom rates reported in this publication are based on a statewide survey of 122 farmers, custom operators, farm managers and landowners conducted in 2012.… Continue reading

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Benefits and concerns with 2,4-D resistant corn

By Ty Higgins, Ohio Ag Net

Dandelions are the bane of many lawn owners who annually do battle with the deep-rooted, prolific weed. They can be even more of a challenge when choking out crops that are a food source. Every year farmers have to deal with tougher weeds that naturally adapt to resist herbicides.

“The biggest issue with weeds is that you are competing for nutrients in your crop,” said Kevin Richards, American Farm Bureau biotechnology specialist. “Weeds are really going to impact your yield and your ability to produce a good healthy crop.”

That’s why farmers are eager for options, like a new variety of corn that isn’t phased by the herbicide 2,4-D. Farmers could spray the chemical right on the corn, the crop would live and the weeds wouldn’t. But some worry that the herbicide would have other effects on the environment. According to Richards, the federal government has been closely studying that very issue.… Continue reading

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It is still a long time until crops canopy

By Mark Loux, Ohio State University Extension herbicide specialist

We have high expectations of herbicide programs anymore, and we have a lot of good herbicides to choose from. Something that can get overlooked as herbicide programs are planned, however, is the effect of early planting on the duration of weed control that is required. We plant earlier on average than we did 25 years ago, and then we have years like this one, where we plant even earlier. Within the time frame of about mid-April through mid-May, crops planted earlier do not necessarily develop more rapidly, so the time until crop canopy may not vary much with planting date. Herbicide programs are intended primarily to control weeds until the crop canopy has developed sufficiently to shade out later-emerging weeds. So the net result of early planting can be an extension of the duration of control that needs to be provided by herbicides.… Continue reading

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Ohio’s Crop Progress Report – April 30th, 2012

OHIO CROP WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS

The average temperature for the State was 47.6 degrees, 5.8 degrees below normal for the week ending Sunday, April 29, 2012. Precipitation averaged 0.78 inches, 0.05 inches above normal. There were 29 modified growing degree days, 30 days below normal.

Reporters rated 5.0 days suitable for fieldwork during the seven-day period ending Friday, April 27, 2012. Topsoil moisture was rated 3 percent very short, 19 percent short, 71 percent adequate, and 7 percent surplus.

FIELD ACTIVITIES AND CROP PROGRESS WEEK ENDING SUNDAY APRIL 29th 2012

Temperatures for the State were below normal, while precipitation was slightly above normal for the week. Reporters indicate that field conditions are dryer than usual for this time of year, which has negatively affected germination of planted crops. Growth of hay and wheat fields has slowed down due to lack of rain and cool nights. Other field activities for the week include field application of fertilizers and manure, tilling ground, and corn and soybean planting.… Continue reading

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Ohio's Crop Progress Report – April 30th, 2012

OHIO CROP WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS

The average temperature for the State was 47.6 degrees, 5.8 degrees below normal for the week ending Sunday, April 29, 2012. Precipitation averaged 0.78 inches, 0.05 inches above normal. There were 29 modified growing degree days, 30 days below normal.

Reporters rated 5.0 days suitable for fieldwork during the seven-day period ending Friday, April 27, 2012. Topsoil moisture was rated 3 percent very short, 19 percent short, 71 percent adequate, and 7 percent surplus.

FIELD ACTIVITIES AND CROP PROGRESS WEEK ENDING SUNDAY APRIL 29th 2012

Temperatures for the State were below normal, while precipitation was slightly above normal for the week. Reporters indicate that field conditions are dryer than usual for this time of year, which has negatively affected germination of planted crops. Growth of hay and wheat fields has slowed down due to lack of rain and cool nights. Other field activities for the week include field application of fertilizers and manure, tilling ground, and corn and soybean planting.… Continue reading

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Wheat is at a critical disease stage

By Dave Scheiderer, Integrated Ag Services

Now is the time to take a close look at your wheat crop. Most of the wheat in central Ohio is nearing complete flag leaf emergence (Feekes 9). This is the critical growth stage to determine the need for a fungicide application to control leaf diseases. Integrated Ag Services (IAS) consultants have been scouting several wheat fields, and so far we’ve seen very low disease pressure. Septoria leaf has been found on some of the lower leaves and Powdery Mildew has been found in some over seeded areas, such as overlaps on point rows, but these areas are very limited. In general, we don’t think a lot of fungicide will need to be sprayed on wheat in central Ohio.

For those farmers concerned about grain quality and yield reductions caused by Fusarium Head Scab, the timely use of a fungicide like Prosario can reduce the incidence of this disease.… Continue reading

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Uneven corn emergence issues

By Jeff Rectenwald, Monsanto territory agronomist

Several factors can contribute to uneven corn emergence and growth early in the season. Replanting is not often justified due to uneven stands; however, understanding why uneven emergence occurred can help minimize the risk in the future. Additionally, consideration should be given to how uneven early growth can affect the implementation of some management tools the rest of the growing season.

Potential causes of uneven growth:

• Soil Moisture Variability in Seed Zone — a corn kernel imbibes approximately one third of its weight in water during germination. When kernels within a row are exposed to different amounts of soil moisture, the rate of germination and emergence can vary from plant to plant, resulting in uneven emergence and early growth, or possibly stand loss. Small differences in soil moisture within a row can lead to considerable differences in germination and emergence. Planting deeper to reach uniform soil moisture, managing residue to minimize trash getting wedged into the seed trench, and reducing additional loss of soil moisture can help achieve more uniform emergence and early growth.… Continue reading

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Hamlet Protein opens new plant in Ohio

By Kayla Weaver

Moving to a foreign country and building a new house is an event that requires much time and consideration. The process requires visiting several locations, evaluating the cost involved, determining the availability of materials, becoming familiar with the different laws and hoping to be welcomed in the community that is chosen. This is very similar to the process that one feed production company recently went through to expand their business and open a new facility in the United States.

Originating in Denmark, Hamlet Protein has a successful 20-year history in the animal feed industry that has led to their newest plant opening four months ago in Findlay. Since its founding in 1992, Hamlet has experienced continuous growth throughout more than 40 countries worldwide, but has only recently become a part of U.S. markets.

Hamlet’s product line focuses on high-end protein products derived from soybean meal. The bioconversion process used at Hamlet was developed by the company’s founder, Ole K.… Continue reading

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Cover crop field guide available

By Matt Reese

There is a new resource out for those who are interested in using cover crops on their Ohio farms.

The 136-page “Midwest Cover Crops Field Guide” was recently released by the Midwest Cover Crop Council.

“The Midwest Cover Crop Council, which Ohio State is part of, has put together different resources. The latest one is the Midwest Cover Crop Field Guide. It fits in your coat pocket and we’re selling it for $5,” said Alan Sundermeier, with OSU Extension. “It is designed to highlight specific cover crops for the Midwest area for our use. There are recommendations, identification, seeding rates — all the information you need.“

Sundermeier said more farmers are looking into the many benefits of cover crops to address real production needs in their operations.

“Any time we can hold nutrients in living, growing roots, we’re going to do a much better job of keeping those nutrients in the field and helping crop production as a result of that.… Continue reading

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OSU enterprise budgets available to help farmers with decision making

As farmers decide what resources to commit to achieving the most profitable enterprises on their farms, devising a budget can be one of the best ways to help streamline the decision-making process, said a pair of Ohio State University Extension experts.

OSU Extension has a long history of developing enterprise budgets that can be used as a starting point for producers in their budgeting process. Farmers can find enterprise budgets for 2012 at http://aede.osu.edu/programs/farmmanagement/budgets

The website is offered by Ohio State University’s Department of Agricultural, Environmental and Development Economics.

Budgeting helps guide farmers through the decision-making process and can help farmers begin to answer questions about raising livestock and growing crops, said Barry Ward, production business management leader for OSU Extension.

“Without some form of budgeting and some method to track your enterprise’s progress you’ll have difficulty determining your most profitable enterprise or enterprises and if you’ve met your goals for the farm,” Ward said.… Continue reading

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E15 ready to clear final hurdle

 

The American ethanol industry stands on the brink of bridging the final federal hurdle to E15 availability after three years of concerted efforts. Ethanol producers have joined together to fund a nationwide fuel survey, which will satisfy the final requirement of the partial E15 waiver granted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

 

“The National Corn Growers Association applauds the ethanol industry for this momentous accomplishment,” said Garry Niemeyer, NCGA President. “We have long understood the economic, environmental and national security benefits of this renewable, domestic fuel. Finally, the hard work invested in pushing to increase these benefits through increased ethanol usage can come to fruition.”

 

Ethanol producers stepped up to provide the vast majority of the funding for this survey despite owning only a handful of the 160,000 gas stations that participate in the survey.

 

“Ethanol producers have taken on a proactive role in this process and American consumers will benefit,” Niemeyer said.… Continue reading

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Warm weather pushes corn planting

Abnormally warm temperatures are being celebrated throughout the state but have grain farmers changing standard spring planting dates, though another record corn crop is slated.

Farming this season is a complete reversal of 2011’s severely rain-delayed planting season. Above-average temperatures motivated some farmers to get a head start in their fields while others have been hesitant to plant early in fear of unpredictable Ohio weather. Word-of-mouth news is that some Buckeye farmers have more than half of their acreage planted while others are still waiting to begin.

April 15 was the average last-freeze date and crop insurance policies do not protect potential replanting costs if farmers plant before the earliest seeding date — April 6. April 20 is the unofficial planting start date being recognized by a majority of Ohio farmers.

“There will be a huge volume of corn in the ground regardless of differing planting timeframes,” said Ohio Corn & Wheat Growers Association (OCWGA) Executive Director Tadd Nicholson.… Continue reading

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April a great time for planting alfalfa

April is a good month to plant and establish a new stand of alfalfa. In fact, the sooner, the better, says an Ohio State University Extension educator.

Once an alfalfa plant has germinated, that new plant needs 6-8 weeks to establish a good root system that enables it to handle warmer and drier summer weather, said Rory Lewandowski, an OSU Extension educator in Wayne County. Planting too late in spring can result in plants that can’t tolerate summer weather, possibly causing stand loss.

At about 8-10 weeks after emergence, the plant pulls the growing point below the soil surface, a process called contractile growth.

“Once contractile growth occurs, the alfalfa plant is considered a true perennial,” Lewandowski said. “The protected growing point below the soil surface is the reason why the alfalfa plant can survive winter temperatures, close cutting and grazing.”

Some of the most common questions regarding successful alfalfa establishment include soil fertility, planting depth and weed control, he said.… Continue reading

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Scouting and treating black cutworm

By Dave Nanda, Director of Genetics & Technology 
Seed Consultants, Inc.

This has been one of the warmest winters recorded according to the weather scientists. It

has been good for getting a lot of corn in the ground so early. However, Black cutworm moth counts have been very high this spring. The warm weather has given an opportunity to certain weeds and insects to prosper. By the time corn germinates, hungry cutworms might be waiting. 
According to Purdue entomologists, Krupke and Obermeyer, cutworm moths are arriving at very high numbers early. Black cutworm is one of most destructive insects since it cuts the corn seedlings near the ground level. 
We must be vigilant and scout for insect pests more aggressively this year because the high survival rate of insects during the past winter.

The following points may be helpful to protect your corn:

• Scout weedy fields or those with young corn seedlings.… Continue reading

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