Crops

Ohio Field Leader Podcast, Episode 44, Soybeans, Social Media and Succession Planning

By Dusty Sonnenberg, CCA, Field Leader, a project of the Ohio Soybean Council and Soybean Check-off

The Ohio Field Leader Roadshow collides with social media influencer Farmwithzoe on Episode 44. Dusty visits with Zoe Kent to discuss soybean farming, social media and its role in promoting production agriculture to the general public, and the importance of succession planning.… Continue reading

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SAF GREET update announced

Tune in to the audio player as Ohio Ag Net’s Dusty Sonnenberg talks with Ohio Corn & Wheat’s Tadd Nicholson about SAF tax credits and DOE’s Argonne GREET model.

After months of waiting, the U.S. Treasury Department released a highly anticipated update to the Department of Energy’s Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Technologies (GREET) model on April 30.

The Inflation Reduction Act, passed in 2022, allocates tax credits for biofuels that can demonstrate that they cut greenhouse gas emissions by 50% or more. After the law was passed, Treasury and EPA were charged with choosing a model that would measure emissions throughout the life of biofuels. Late in 2023 the decision was made to settle on the GREET model, but it needed updates.

The April 30 update provided guidance on how feedstocks like corn ethanol could qualify for sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) under the 40B tax credit of the Inflation Reduction Act (IRA).… Continue reading

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Timber Talk: An introduction to Ohio’s forest products industry

By Jenna Reese, Executive Director of the Ohio Forestry Association, Inc.

There are nearly 8 million acres of forests in Ohio, which account for 31% of total land use in the state. As recently as the 1890s, only 10% of Ohio’s landscape was forested. There have been significant conservation and reforestation efforts since that time to bring about the 31% Ohio enjoys now. Prior to European-American settlement, it is rumored that a squirrel could travel from the Ohio River to Lake Erie without ever touching the ground, according to the U.S. Forest Service. Due to the slopes and poor soil quality in large portions of eastern Ohio, it is not suitable for croplands, so that is where the bulk of Ohio’s forests are found today.  The majority of those 8 million acres, 86%, are privately owned family farms. Of those forests, 96.3% are hardwood due to the native species that thrive here.… Continue reading

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Buckeye Temp Tracker – April 30, 2024

The Buckeye Temp Tracker is powered by BA Genetics and takes note of soil temperatures in four counties each week. Check back each Wednesday for the next update throughout this planting season.

In the interactive map below, click on the thermometer icons to see the soil temperature results from each of the four Ohio counties involved in the program.

Each reading is in degrees Fahrenheit.


This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 300px-Map_of_Ohio_highlighting_Ashland_County.svg_.png

Ashland County

Unworked Corn Stalks – 60 degrees

Worked Ground – 60 degrees


Fairfield County

Unworked Cornstalks – 57 degrees (now worked and planted)

Worked Ground – 58 degrees (planted


Fayette County

Unworked Cornstalks – 60 degrees

Worked Ground – 63 degrees


Mercer County

Unworked Corn Stalks – 61 degrees

Worked Ground – 63 degrees

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US Soybeans, quality and sustainability

By Dusty Sonnenberg, CCA, Field Leader, a project of the Ohio Soybean Council and Soybean Check-off

It is a good feeling when a farmer knows that the customer wants to have their product.  In a world where both quality and sustainability are sought after, U.S. Soy is meeting the need. “I had three different people beg for our product,” said Jerry Bambauer, Ohio soybean farmer and board member of the Ohio Soybean Council, commenting on a recent U. S Soybean Export Council trip to Greece.

Recently, Bambauer along with Madison Layman, Manager, Demand and Market Development for the Ohio Soybean Council, traveled to Rhodes, Greece to present at the U.S. Soybean Export Council – USSEC Sustainable Aquaculture Seminar and Workshop. This is part of a checkoff-funded program called the Soy Innovation Center, an initiative to support the technical feed industry programs in Europe and encourage utilization of US Soy.

 “The Soy Innovation Center is basically a training program for mid to high tier employes in industries that are customers in the soybean supply chain,” said Layman.… Continue reading

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Major planting progress made this week

The ground continued to dry out and spraying activities were underway, according to Ben Torrance, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 2 percent short, 72 percent adequate, and 26 percent surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending on April 28 was 53.9 degrees, 0.8 degrees above normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 0.26 inches of precipitation, 0.47 inches below average. There were 3.8 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending April 28.

Farmers reported most areas have dried out apart from somelow areas. Corn and soybean planting progress inched forward to 6 and 7 percent planted, respectively. Oats were 66 percent planted. Winter wheat was 83 percent jointed and winter wheat condition was 69 percent good to excellent. Farmers reported fieldwork continued including tillage, spraying, fertilizing, and planting. Pollination periods for
fruit trees had been very effective.

Click here to read the full report from USDA NASS.Continue reading

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Corn Planting Cab Cam with Casey Niese, Niese Farms

Ride along in our latest Cab Cam as we follow Casey Niese of Niese Farms as he plants corn in Hancock County. Ohio Ag Net’s Joel Penhorwood joins Casey to talk about their impressive tandem planting setup as well as the the challenges and strategies that are defining the 2024 planting season.

The 2024 Cab Cam series is sponsored by Precision Agri-Services Inc. More information at www.precisionagriservices.com.… Continue reading

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Spring Soil Sampling Tips to Combat SCN

By the SCN Coalition

Because SCN is the most damaging pathogen in U.S. soybeans – costing farmers more than $1 billion annually in lost yields – farmers who didn’t have time to pull soil samples for soybean cyst nematode (SCN) last fall have another opportunity this spring.

Knowing the SCN number for each field will help farmers determine the appropriate management strategies to use. An active SCN management plan includes:

1.              Testing fields to know SCN numbers.

2.              Rotating SCN-resistant varieties.

3.              Rotating to non-host crops.

4.              Possibly using a nematode-protectant seed treatment.

5.              WATCH VIDEO

The SCN Coalition is excited about the discovery and encourages farmers and industry stakeholders to continue to advocate for new tools like this.

Spring soil sampling tips:

Experts recommend waiting until the soil warms up and taking soil cores when fields aren’t muddy. Take 20 cores from every 20 acres or so collected from the upper 8 inches of soil.… Continue reading

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Is carbon smart soil smart? (and money smart?)

By Randall Reeder, P.E., Extension Agricultural Engineer (retired)

That’s a tongue twister. We’ve heard a lot about “climate smart.” If we do the practices suggested to be smart for the climate, are we also being “soil smart?”

When you look at the main practices for climate smart, you will see they agree completely with improving soil health. And those practices that make the soil healthier also save money in the long-term (money smart).

There are five core principles growers can implement to help maintain soil and biodiversity: minimize soil disturbance; grow plants year-round; keep the ground covered; diversify crop rotations; and integrate livestock when possible.

Translation: use continuous no-till, cover crops and crop rotation to be “climate smart.” So, the answer to the question(s) in the headline is, yes, soil smart is also climate smart. And it’s also money smart over time.

Getting past the first few years can be a financial challenge.… Continue reading

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Battle for the Belt: Season 2 Episode 4- Chilling Injury

By Alex Lindsey, Taylor Dill and Laura Lindsey, adapted from C.O.R.N. 2024-11

Episode 4 of battle for the Belt is now available: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T5_QXF-Px7s

In Episode 4, Dr. Alex Lindsey, Associate Professor of Crop Ecophysiology & Agronomy, walks us through his current research project on how cold temperatures and water can affect early planted soybeans within the first 24 hours of planting.

How does cold temperature and water affect germination and emergence?

We have been studying how cold temperatures and water affect soybeans under ultra-early planting conditions using some lab experiments. We planted soybeans into field soil (starting at 20% or 60% available water content) at 1” (shallow) or 1.5” (normal) planting depths and exposed them to different combinations of cold temperatures and water treatments during the first 24 hours after planting. After the first 24 hours, we raised the temperature in the chamber to 70°F and measured emergence.

Preliminary results suggest that no water application (even if temperature dropped to 35°F) resulted in the greatest emergence (75%) after 11 days.… Continue reading

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Corn Placement and Management

Join Mike Hannewald, field agronomist with Beck’s Hybrids, in the latest installment of our agronomy video series. This episode delves into the intricacies of corn placement and management techniques that are crucial for optimizing yield. Mike highlights the crucial importance of seeding rate and population in corn farming—factors now understood to be more pivotal than previously recognized. Take a look at the groundbreaking data and practical advice from Beck’s Practical Farm Research (PFR), demonstrating how optimal seeding rates and population densities can dramatically influence yield potential.

More from Beck’s online at www.beckshybrids.com.… Continue reading

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Prime time for lime

By Rendell Shira, RS Crop Consulting

When is the best time to apply lime?

Drier field conditions normally associated with the summer months have traditionally facilitated the best opportunity to apply ag lime. When profit margins are thin, such as we are facing in 2024, proper pH becomes vital as it translates to increased fertilizer efficiency and maximum nutrient availability. The major nutrients (N, P, K, S, Ca, Mg) are most available when the pH ranges from 6.5-7.0.

Rendell Shira, RS Crop Consulting

 Most commonly used ag lime sources are referred to as either “low magnesium” or ‘high magnesium.”

A soil test will guide you as to which source is needed. Generally, the minimum quantities of calcium and magnesium should be 1,000 pounds per acre and 250 pounds per acre, respectively.

 Of course, another important factor in choosing your lime source is the cost per ton. Analyzing the cost per ton in conjunction with the pounds of ENP/T should help you make this decision.… Continue reading

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A reminder about planting depth

By Matt Hutcheson, CCA, Soybean Lead/Field Agronomist,Seed Consultants, Inc. 

Planting is one of the most critical management practices of the year because it sets the stage for the entire growing season. There are several key aspects of planting, one of which is planting depth. Invariably, every year Seed Consultants’ agronomists come across problems that are caused by variable and improper planting depth. Planting depth is critical because it impacts germination, seedling development, root development, emergence, and ultimately crop yields.

For corn, seed needs to be planted no shallower than 1.5 inches below the soil surface. Typically, the suggested range is 1.5 to 2 inches, however, some studies and growers have seen success at depths up to 3 inches. It is important to make sure that corn is planted into adequate soil moisture for germination. In addition, corn needs to be at least 1.5 inches deep for the proper early development of the root system.… Continue reading

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Battle of the Belt, 2024 Planting Update

By Dusty Sonnenberg, CCA, Field Leader, a project of the Ohio Soybean Council and Soybean Check-off

Every year is different. Early indications of the potential for near record early planting dates across the state quickly faded with the above average rainfall that has been experienced in many areas. The Battle for the Belt, which to plant first – corn or soybean, is in year number two. While the 2023 research project went off without a hitch for early planting dates, 2024 has been a mixed bag.

Dr. Laura Lindsey is one of the lead investigators and says that they still have their fingers crossed in hopes of getting the early planting accomplished at all the locations. “Last year this project was a lot easier,” said Dr. Laura Lindsey, OSU Extension State Soybean and Small Grains Specialist. “In 2023 we had 5 planting dates at 3 locations across Ohio and it worked perfectly.… Continue reading

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Buckeye Temp Tracker – April 23, 2024

The Buckeye Temp Tracker is powered by BA Genetics and takes note of soil temperatures in four counties each week. Check back each Wednesday for the next update throughout this planting season.

In the interactive map below, click on the thermometer icons to see the soil temperature results from each of the four Ohio counties involved in the program.

Each reading is in degrees Fahrenheit.


This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 300px-Map_of_Ohio_highlighting_Ashland_County.svg_.png

Ashland County

Non-Worked Corn Stalks – 40 degrees

Worked Ground – 40 degrees


Fairfield County

Non-Worked Corn Stalks – 42 degrees

Worked Ground – 42 degrees


Fayette County

Non-Worked Corn Stalks – 40 degrees

Worked Ground – 45 degrees


Mercer County

Non-Worked Corn Stalks – 43 degrees

Worked Ground – 44 degrees

Continue reading

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Warmer temps spur on fieldwork

Warmer weather and high winds helped to dry ground and allowed for fieldwork to begin, according to Ben Torrance, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 1 percent short, 55 percent adequate, and 44 percent surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending on April 21 was 57.7 degrees, 5.6 degrees above normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 0.55 inches of precipitation, 0.22 inches below average. There were 2 days suitable for
fieldwork during the week ending April 21.

Farmers reported most flooding from earlier in the month had subsided and fields were recovering well. Some fieldwork began including tillage, spraying, fertilizer applications, and some planting. Oats were 27 percent planted. Winter wheat was 69 percent jointed and winter wheat condition was 68 percent good to excellent. Farmers reported nitrogen applications made to wheat made improvements to stand quality. Pastures greened up and were looking lush, and animals have been grazing well.… Continue reading

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EPA issues emergency fuel waiver for E-15 sales 

In this featured audio, Matt Reese talks with Tadd Nicholson from Ohio Corn and Wheat about the EPA’s recent announcement on the E15 waiver. Read below for an additional release from the National Corn Growers Association.

Corn Growers Applaud EPA for Allowing Access to Higher Blends of Ethanol During Summer Months

By Bryan Goodman

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced today that it will use its existing authority to prevent drivers from losing access to lower-cost and lower-emission E15, a higher ethanol blend often marketed as Unleaded 88.

The National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) and state corn grower organizations, which have advocated for the move, praised the decision.

“This waiver is good news for corn growers and those in rural America who will benefit economically from this decision and for consumers who will save money at the pump during a busy travel season,” said Minnesota farmer and NCGA President Harold Wolle.… Continue reading

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Governor DeWine Announces Statewide Open Enrollment for H2Ohio Agricultural Incentive Program

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine and Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) Director Brian Baldridge announced today that H2Ohio’s agriculture incentive program is now being offered to producers throughout the state.

Governor DeWine launched H2Ohio in 2019 as a comprehensive initiative aimed at addressing various threats to water quality, including harmful algal blooms caused by phosphorus runoff. H2Ohio’s agricultural program, which initially focused solely on farms located in northwest Ohio near Lake Erie, incentivizes farmers to implement science-based, proven best management practices to prevent nutrient runoff and improve water quality.

“H2Ohio is now firmly established in northwest Ohio, giving us the opportunity to take this program to other parts of the state,” said Governor DeWine. “We appreciate the commitment that our current H2Ohio farmers have shown to protecting Lake Erie, and we look forward to engaging more producers across Ohio on how they can contribute to cleaner water throughout the state.”

Statewide enrollment for row-crop producers who farm in Ohio’s 64 counties outside of northwest Ohio’s Western Lake Erie Basin will open next week.… Continue reading

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