Livestock



Ohio Cattlemen’s Association accepting bull consignments

The Ohio Cattlemen’s Association is currently accepting bull consignments to the two Seedstock Improvement Sales held in April. The sales, held on Friday, March 30, at 7 p.m. at Muskingum Livestock in Zanesville, Ohio, and Saturday, April 16 at noon at Union Stock Yards Company in Hillsboro, Ohio, offer an affordable way to market bulls from multiple breeds in one location and on one day. Buyers have the assurance of buying bulls with known genetics, a completed vaccination regiment, and a breeding soundness exam.

The Seedstock Improvement Sales are open to consignments from all breeds of bulls. Consignors must be a current member of the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association to participate. Bulls are required to be registered and to have expected progeny differences (EPDs). The bulls will be placed in sale order based on a within breed evaluation star system using EPDs for birth weight, weaning weight, yearling weight, and milk. Bulls consigned to the sales can be from one to five years of age.… Continue reading

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Ohio Cattlemen's Association accepting bull consignments

The Ohio Cattlemen’s Association is currently accepting bull consignments to the two Seedstock Improvement Sales held in April. The sales, held on Friday, March 30, at 7 p.m. at Muskingum Livestock in Zanesville, Ohio, and Saturday, April 16 at noon at Union Stock Yards Company in Hillsboro, Ohio, offer an affordable way to market bulls from multiple breeds in one location and on one day. Buyers have the assurance of buying bulls with known genetics, a completed vaccination regiment, and a breeding soundness exam.

The Seedstock Improvement Sales are open to consignments from all breeds of bulls. Consignors must be a current member of the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association to participate. Bulls are required to be registered and to have expected progeny differences (EPDs). The bulls will be placed in sale order based on a within breed evaluation star system using EPDs for birth weight, weaning weight, yearling weight, and milk. Bulls consigned to the sales can be from one to five years of age.… Continue reading

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Thank God for the FDA: A sour tale of lemon flavored milk

By Don “Doc” Sanders

While not perfect, the Food and Drug Administration does provide scientific oversight to regulate the safety of our food supply. In contrast, the European Union puts its finger in the air to determine which direction the wind is blowing before setting food safety policy. Then they put it up for a vote in parliament.

In another corner of the world the Chinese government puts little stock in monitoring food safety. And with the events of the past few weeks, the Chinese citizens are certainly mad about it, burning up Chinese cyberspace with Tweets and Facebook and MySpace postings.

China is now in its third major milk scandal in a decade. The first two were over melamine-contaminated milk. You may remember the story about 50,000 babies being hospitalized in intensive care after consuming the concoction. (It looked and tasted somewhat like milk and was marketed as milk, but made babies ill.)… Continue reading

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2012 beef prices will be demand driven

By Derrell S. Peel, Oklahoma State University Extension Livestock Marketing Specialist

Beef and cattle prices increased to new record levels in 2011 and are expected to push even higher in 2012. Several years of declining cattle inventories culminated in late 2011 with a projected 3% decrease in slaughter that combined with lighter carcass weights to result in a 3.8% less beef in the fourth quarter of 2011 compared to a year earlier. For 2012, slaughter is forecast to drop another five plus percent and, even with an expected increase in carcass weights, will result in a nearly four percent drop in beef production for the year. Decreasing beef production ensures that wholesale and retail beef prices will be pushed even higher in 2012. Cattle supplies that are even tighter, on a relative basis, likewise ensure that fed and feeder prices will be pushed to the limit and maintain strong negative pressure on feedlot, packing and retail margins.… Continue reading

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Less bedding can benefit in-transit market pigs

In a new study, funded by the Pork Checkoff, researchers at Texas Tech and Iowa State universities found that the pork industry can generally use less bedding year-round that it currently does while improving overall animal well-being — a breakthrough finding that could save the industry an estimated $10.1 million per year.

John McGlone, a swine researcher at Texas Tech University and principal researcher for the study, along with Anna Butters-Johnson an Iowa State University researcher, looked at various rates of bedding in semi-trailers at different times of year and in different locations throughout the Midwest. This approach provided data representing cold, mild and hot weather.

Specifically, the research trials showed that groups of pigs headed to market can experience lower mortality rates in warm weather and overall improved well-being year-round when less bedding is used in transport trailers. According to McGlone, the current standard in the industry is to use four bales of bedding per semi-trailer.… Continue reading

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Hog producers follow prudent path

Hog production returned to profitability in 2011, but producers remain cautious about the future. This is evidenced by the modest expansion of the breeding herd as reported by USDA at the end of the year, said a Purdue University Extension economist.

“Limited expansion would seem to be the prudent path until more is known about 2012 crop yields and feed prices. This suggests no expansion of the breeding herd until mid-summer 2012,” said Chris Hurt.

Pork production is expected to rise by 2 to 2.5% in 2012, but most of that increase is due to more pigs per litter rather than from larger farrowings. Exports are expected to remain strong so that the per capita pork availability in the United States will only increase by about 1%, he said.

“Pork demand will also be supported by smaller per capita supplies of beef and poultry in 2012. As a result, hog prices are expected to be down only modestly from 2011 levels with similar costs.… Continue reading

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ODNR emergency manure plan responds to wet 2011

By Matt Reese

The wet weather has caused problems in nearly every aspect of Ohio agriculture last year. And while harvest is mostly wrapped up around the state, the wet weather continues to haunt livestock producers who had little, if any, opportunity to apply manure this fall due to the incessant rains.

“The record setting rains of 2011 have definitely been a challenge for Ohio farmers,” said Larry Antosch, senior director of policy development and environmental policy for the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation. “I have heard some concerns from our field staff in northeast Ohio related to the difficulties of getting manure on the ground due to the record setting wet conditions.”

In response to the unique challenges in 2011, the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Soil and Water Conservation has developed an Emergency Liquid Manure Plan based upon Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Standard 663.

“OFBF Policy support the farmers’ right to haul manure as long as they follow proper setbacks and guidelines in NRCS Standard 633.… Continue reading

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Winter preparations reduce headaches for beef producers

With La Niña’s arrival, the forecast is for another winter colder and wetter than normal, something a Purdue Extension beef specialist said livestock producers need to prepare for.

Taking simple steps to prepare equipment, facilities and feed supplies can help reduce headaches for cattle producers, Ron Lemenager said.

“When the blizzard hits or the wind chills are below zero, tempers might flare, but that won’t thaw water or get the tractor started to feed cows,” he said. “A little planning when the weather is mild could make things go a lot easier for both producers and the livestock.”

Part of that means taking the time to do simple things, such as winterizing water sources by insulating them and making sure heating elements are in working order. Lemenager also recommended checking tractor batteries to make sure they can handle cold weather and making sure diesel tractors needed to move feed or snow are plugged in and ready to go.… Continue reading

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Prepare for late gestation nutrition

By Rory Lewandowski, Extension educator, Athens County and Buckeye Hills EERA

Recently a first cutting hay test crossed my desk that had a crude protein value of 8% and a TDN level of 55%. This is similar to many first cutting hay quality results across the state. This hay will work for a mid-gestation cow under decent environmental conditions. It is certainly not going to meet the nutrient needs of a cow in late gestation. So, as a livestock manager, what is your plan to meet the late gestation nutritional needs? Now is the time to prepare for those nutritional requirements.

As I thought about this topic, I went back to the handout of Francis Fluharty’s presentation at last winter’s Ohio beef school that was titled “Late Gestation and Early Lactation: The Most Important Stages of Production.” One of the themes of this presentation was fetal programming. Essentially, late gestation nutrition sets up or programs to some extent how that developing calf will respond to its world after birth.… Continue reading

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American Angus Association to introduce PathfinderPlus

The American Angus Association will soon introduce a voluntary, inventory-based reporting system designed to capture additional reproductive trait data and to ultimately expand reproductive and lifetime productivity tools, such as longevity measures.

The new program, known as PathfinderPlus, will debut in early 2012 and provide Angus breeders and their customers with additional information to make effective selection decisions.

“The PathfinderPlus program is a unique system that will allow us to more effectively capture reproductive trait data while providing participants with additional information at weaning processing time, such as calving ease, birth weight and weaning weight EPDs for calves out of inventoried cows,” says Bill Bowman, Association chief operating officer (COO) and director of performance programs.

Breeders interested in participating in PathfinderPlus can enroll in the program through AAA Login, available at www.angus.org, beginning early 2012.

To begin, breeders provide an online inventory of breeding heifers and cows in their herd.… Continue reading

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USDA hog report

Ohio hog producers had 2,130,000 hogs on hand December 1, 2011, which was up 4% from a year earlier, and up slightly from last quarter. The number of market hogs, at 1,960,000 head, was up 5% from last year and up 1% from last quarter. Breeding stock, at 170,000 head, was the same as last year and last quarter.
The September-November pig crop numbered 892,000 head, which was up 5% from last year and up 4% from last quarter. The number of sows farrowed during the September-November 2011 quarter, at 91,000, was 2,000 head above last quarter and 1,000 head above last year. Pigs saved per litter during the September-November 2011 quarter averaged 9.8 and was up 4 percent from the same period last year and up 2 percent from last quarter.
Ohio producers intend to farrow 88,000 sows during the December-February 2012 quarter; down 1% from a year earlier. Farrowing intentions for the spring quarter, March-May 2012, is 89,000; down 2 percent from the same quarter of 2011.… Continue reading

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Proper mineral management key to keeping cattle healthy

Beef producers shouldn’t overlook proper mineral intake as part of an overall feeding plan, according to a Purdue Extension specialist. Ron Lemenager, a professor of animal sciences, said minerals are becoming a more important issue as feed options have changed.

“I think we pretty much had minerals taken care of when everyone was feeding corn and hay,” Lemenager said. “But then it changed and we introduced by-products like distillers dried grains, corn gluten feed and soybean hulls, which changes our supplementation strategy.”

If minerals such as copper, zinc, manganese and selenium are out of balance, a cow could have problems with immune function, reproduction, digestion and metabolism, and onset of puberty, among other issues.

“Minerals are involved with pretty much every metabolic process in the body. Animals do not perform without them,” Lemenager said. “If you don’t properly provide them, it can cause problems.”

Lemenager said the right combinations of forage, feed and supplements can minimize the amount of minerals necessary in some cases.… Continue reading

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Ohio Cattlemen’s Association sets annual meeting and banquet date

The Ohio Cattlemen’s Association’s (OCA) Annual Meeting and Awards Banquet are set for Saturday, Jan. 28, 2012, at the Marriott Columbus Northwest in Columbus. All OCA members are encouraged to attend the day’s events which include policy development sessions, an update on OCA events and programs and OCA’s annual awards banquet.

OCA’s annual meeting will begin at 1 p.m. and will feature Colin Woodall, Vice President of Government Affairs for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association. Various OCA committee chairmen will report to the membership, and the association’s policy development session will happen at this meeting.

Following a hospitality hour at 5 p.m., the OCA Awards Banquet will start at 6 p.m. This event will recognize the best and brightest of Ohio’s beef industry and is sponsored by DeKalb and Asgrow. Awards include: Outstanding County Affiliates, Young Cattleman of the Year, Industry Service Award, Industry Excellence Award, Seedstock Producer of the Year, Commercial Producer of the Year and scholarship presentations.… Continue reading

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Make mine an orange Julius!

By Doc Sanders

For several years some dairymen have been feeding their dairy cows citrus pulp and peel, the remains of squeezed oranges. In most cases, the pulp and peel are pelleted to make it easy to handle, transport and incorporate into cows’ total mix ration (TMR). This is just one more example of cows’ unique ability — as I’ve covered before in my columns and TV commentaries — to put to productive use food byproducts and waste that otherwise would be discarded. 

Orange peel and pulp provide high energy to fuel fermentation in the cow’s rumen. Plus, it offers an economic bonus for the dairy farmer: It partially substitutes expensive nutritional components such as corn and dietary fat.

Another advantage of adding orange peel and pulp to the TMR: Cows love it. They go after it like children eating chocolate chip or M&M cookies.

So, orange pulp and peel help make certain cows take full advantage of the nutrition carefully formulated by a nutritionist in the TMR.… Continue reading

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Improvest research shows benefits for hog production

By Kyle Sharp

Ohio State University animal scientist Dustin Boler has been working on research on Improvest, a new injectable product developed by Pfizer Animal Health that offers an alternative to physical castration in male pigs.

“This product definitely has some advantages in production and carcass cutability, so if it is priced reasonably there are some advantages to its use,” said Boler, who has done meat quality research on the product.

The conclusions were that Improvest did not affect eating quality of fresh meat, has minimal affect on pork quality parameters, increases carcass cutability and does not affect the characteristics of further processed pork products. However, the bellies of treated pigs are thinner and softer, which provides some challenges to bacon processors, and treated hogs are slightly leaner, which means a slight reduction in marbling, Boler said.

Improvest is a protein compound that suppresses testicular function in male hogs and controls the impact of “boar taint” on pork quality when used on intact male hogs.… Continue reading

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Study confirms beef’s role in healthy diet

In a first of its kind study, researchers at The Pennsylvania State University demonstrated that eating beef everyday as part of a heart-healthy diet can improve cholesterol  levels. Texas medical doctor and cattleman Richard Thorpe said the Beef in an Optimal Lean Diet (BOLD) study proves what he has known for years – lean beef not only tastes great but it also plays an important role in a heart-healthy diet.

“As a father, medical doctor and beef producer, I have proudly and confidently served my family beef and have recommended it to my patients for years,” Thorpe said on behalf of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA). “The BOLD study is further proof that Americans should feel good knowing the beef they enjoy eating and serving their loved ones is not only a nutrient-rich, satisfying food that provides 10 essential nutrients in about 150 calories but is good for their heart health as well.”… Continue reading

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Study confirms beef's role in healthy diet

In a first of its kind study, researchers at The Pennsylvania State University demonstrated that eating beef everyday as part of a heart-healthy diet can improve cholesterol  levels. Texas medical doctor and cattleman Richard Thorpe said the Beef in an Optimal Lean Diet (BOLD) study proves what he has known for years – lean beef not only tastes great but it also plays an important role in a heart-healthy diet.

“As a father, medical doctor and beef producer, I have proudly and confidently served my family beef and have recommended it to my patients for years,” Thorpe said on behalf of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA). “The BOLD study is further proof that Americans should feel good knowing the beef they enjoy eating and serving their loved ones is not only a nutrient-rich, satisfying food that provides 10 essential nutrients in about 150 calories but is good for their heart health as well.”… Continue reading

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Ohio pork producers hear industry updates at annual meeting

By Kyle Sharp

About 60 Ohio pork producers heard about a new product that could offer some benefits on their farms during the Ohio Pork Producers Council (OPPC) Annual Meeting, held Dec. 13 at the Der Dutchman Restaurant in Plain City.

The evening meeting included a presentation by National Pork Producers Council (NPPC) CEO Neil Dierks.

“He gave an update on many of the exciting things NPPC has done over the past year, including trade agreements, fighting unreasonable regulations and other things going on in Washington,” said Dick Isler, OPPC executive vice president.

Isler also reviewed the many OPPC activities of the past year and recognized new and retiring members of the OPPC Board of Directors. Retiring from the Board after completing four-year terms were Duane Stateler, McComb; Jean Bell, Zanesville; and Dave Grauer, Shiloh. Joining the Board are Kyle Brown, Marion; Connie Surber, Sabina; and Rich Deaton, New Madison.

OPPC activities highlighted included presentations on pork and pork production in 217 high school family and consumer sciences classes reaching nearly 4,700 students just since September, and more than 8,900 students reached last school year; pork-related educational kits sent to 620 second-grade teachers, reaching 15,500 students; participation at the Preble County Pork Festival, with 150,000 people attending; more than 238,000 views of OPPC-produced videos on YouTube; three new videos/television ads produced featuring Ohio pork producers; a consumer e-news e-mail regularly sent to 10,500 subscribers; 30,000 pounds of ground pork donated in 1-pound packages to Ohio food banks during October Pork Month; and two annual trips to Washington, D.C.,… Continue reading

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Beef short course

This short course is a joint effort of Ohio State University Extension, Michigan State University, and the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture to enhance the cattle industry in the Eastern Corn Belt.

The industry is implementing programs to maintain consumer confidence in the product produced in our facilities. One of these programs is audits conducted by third party entities on animal care and environmental compliance. The first session will focus on feed additives, manure management and maximizing use of the corn crop. The second session will include cattle economics, cattle marketing alternatives and electronic carcass grading.

Both Ohio sessions will be held at the Wood County Junior Fair Building in Bowling Green. Registration and refreshments will be provided beginning at 6 pm each evening.

Participants may enroll by sending a check made payable (US Funds) to Michigan State University ($35 for 1st person and $25 for each additional family/farm member; FFA/4-H students can register for $15 each) and mailed to Faye Watson, Dept.… Continue reading

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