Livestock



Pork producers’ ability to pay for corn

This year’s corn crop is not big enough to meet the entire consumption base that has been built. Prices will have to be high enough to convince some end users to reduce consumption from current levels. Can the pork industry compete with other end users? asked Purdue University economist Chris Hurt.

“The answer is complex and will depend on many factors, including how small the U.S. corn crop is and production in the southern hemisphere this winter,” he said. “Ultimately, the question is how high corn prices have to be to get a sufficient number of end users to reduce consumption.”

The largest competitor for corn in the coming year will be the ethanol industry where USDA analysts currently estimate 5.1 billion bushels of corn use, he said.

“To meet the mandated domestic Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS) will require about 4.7 billion bushels with nearly 400 million additional bushels used to make ethanol that will be exported.… Continue reading

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Pork producers' ability to pay for corn

This year’s corn crop is not big enough to meet the entire consumption base that has been built. Prices will have to be high enough to convince some end users to reduce consumption from current levels. Can the pork industry compete with other end users? asked Purdue University economist Chris Hurt.

“The answer is complex and will depend on many factors, including how small the U.S. corn crop is and production in the southern hemisphere this winter,” he said. “Ultimately, the question is how high corn prices have to be to get a sufficient number of end users to reduce consumption.”

The largest competitor for corn in the coming year will be the ethanol industry where USDA analysts currently estimate 5.1 billion bushels of corn use, he said.

“To meet the mandated domestic Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS) will require about 4.7 billion bushels with nearly 400 million additional bushels used to make ethanol that will be exported.… Continue reading

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Preparing for the “second” calving season

By John F. Grimes, OSU Extension Beef Coordinator
The fall calving season is just around the corner for several producers around the state. While a minority of Ohio’s cow-calf producers utilize fall calving as a management practice, there are several valid reasons to calve in this less traditional setting. As with just about any management practice, there are drawbacks that need to be considered as well. Producers must understand that there are unique characteristics associated with fall calving and they should be prepared for the differences when compared to a spring calving season.
I believe there are some very distinct advantages to calving in the late summer or early fall. Probably the biggest advantage for calving at this time of year is the fact that we have typically see warmer, drier conditions in the calving environment. Yes, it can be downright hot during this time, but let’s not forget the challenges of calving in the first quarter of the year.… Continue reading

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Preparing for the "second" calving season

By John F. Grimes, OSU Extension Beef Coordinator
The fall calving season is just around the corner for several producers around the state. While a minority of Ohio’s cow-calf producers utilize fall calving as a management practice, there are several valid reasons to calve in this less traditional setting. As with just about any management practice, there are drawbacks that need to be considered as well. Producers must understand that there are unique characteristics associated with fall calving and they should be prepared for the differences when compared to a spring calving season.
I believe there are some very distinct advantages to calving in the late summer or early fall. Probably the biggest advantage for calving at this time of year is the fact that we have typically see warmer, drier conditions in the calving environment. Yes, it can be downright hot during this time, but let’s not forget the challenges of calving in the first quarter of the year.… Continue reading

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Producers Reminded of FSA’s 2011 Livestock Disaster Program Deadline

Steven Maurer, State Executive Director for Ohio’s Farm Service Agency (FSA), would like to remind producers who lose livestock due to adverse weather, such as hurricanes, floods, blizzards, disease, extreme heat and extreme cold, on or after January 1, 2011, and before October 1, 2011, can sign-up for the FSA’s Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP).

Livestock losses had to occur no later than 60 days after the adverse weather event, but prior to October 1, 2011.  For livestock losses that occur in calendar year 2011, producers will have 30 days after the death to file a notice of loss to FSA, but not later than October 31, 2011 to apply for payment.

Adequate documentation must prove the death of eligible livestock occurred as a direct result of an eligible adverse weather event in the calendar year for which benefits are being requested. If adequate verifiable proof of death records documentation is not available, a livestock producer may provide reliable records, along with verifiable beginning and ending inventory, as proof of death.… Continue reading

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Producers Reminded of FSA's 2011 Livestock Disaster Program Deadline

Steven Maurer, State Executive Director for Ohio’s Farm Service Agency (FSA), would like to remind producers who lose livestock due to adverse weather, such as hurricanes, floods, blizzards, disease, extreme heat and extreme cold, on or after January 1, 2011, and before October 1, 2011, can sign-up for the FSA’s Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP).

Livestock losses had to occur no later than 60 days after the adverse weather event, but prior to October 1, 2011.  For livestock losses that occur in calendar year 2011, producers will have 30 days after the death to file a notice of loss to FSA, but not later than October 31, 2011 to apply for payment.

Adequate documentation must prove the death of eligible livestock occurred as a direct result of an eligible adverse weather event in the calendar year for which benefits are being requested. If adequate verifiable proof of death records documentation is not available, a livestock producer may provide reliable records, along with verifiable beginning and ending inventory, as proof of death.… Continue reading

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Learn how to reduce feeding costs at Beef and Forage Field Night Aug. 25 in Jackson

Beef producers are dealing with the rising costs of feed and inputs for making hay, not to mention the impact of this year’s weather on forage quality and seeding. To help the industry meet these challenges, Ohio State University will offer a Beef and Forage Field Night, Thursday, Aug. 25, 5-8:30 p.m., at the Jackson Agricultural Research Station in Jackson, Ohio.

Registration for the event — sponsored by OSU Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) — costs $15 per person, includes dinner and is due by Aug. 19. To register, fill out the form available at http://go.osu.edu/forage and mail, with a check payable to Ohio State University/OARDC, to Kenny Wells, 019 Standpipe Road, Jackson, Ohio 45640.

“Producers attending our field night will not only learn the simple process of sampling hay for nutrient analysis, but they will learn how to use the results of these analyses to help meet the nutritional needs of their livestock,” said Wells, manager of the Jackson Agricultural Research Station.… Continue reading

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U.S. beef, pork exports close big first half with solid June results

If the trend established in the first six months of the year holds up, U.S. beef and pork exports are likely to set several new records in 2011 and each could eclipse the $5 billion mark for the first time ever. According to statistics released by USDA and compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF), June beef exports achieved the second-highest value ever at $461.8 million. This was 23 percent higher than June 2010, and has been surpassed only once – by the March 2011 value total of $475.2 million.

In terms of volume, June beef exports reached 111,362 metric tons – an increase of 15 percent over June 2010. This brought the cumulative 2011 total to 620,851 metric tons valued at $2.55 billion, which was 25 percent higher in volume and 40 percent higher in value than last year’s pace. For the first half of this year, beef exports equated to 13.8 percent of total production with an export value of $192.42 per head of fed slaughter.… Continue reading

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Cattle to car parts: Beef byproducts use to make plastic

University of Alberta professor David Bressler has filed a patent on a new thermal process that can turn beef byproducts into plastics. By finding a way to convert these animal by-products into plastics for industrial use, Bressler and his team hope to divert protein waste from landfills across North America, shift to using renewable resources instead of petrochemicals to make plastics, and boost flagging profit levels in the cattle industry.

Using the throwaway parts of beef carcasses that were sidelined from the value-added production process after bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) devastated the industry in 2003, Bressler, an associate professor in the U of A’s Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, has collaborated with industry, government and other researchers to forge cattle proteins into heavy-duty plastics that could soon be used in everything from car parts to CD cases.

The University of Alberta is the only post-secondary facility to be approved by the Canada Food Inspection Agency to conduct research involving turning high-risk proteins into safe, sustainable materials.… Continue reading

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Livestock Care Standards Take Effect September 29

By Kyle Sharp

On Aug. 1, the Ohio Department of Agriculture resubmitted the veal standards of care as developed and passed by the Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board (OLCSB) to Ohio’s Congressional Joint Committee on Agency Rule Review (JCARR). Unlike a previous hearing on July 11, when intense questioning by members of JCARR prompted ODA to withdraw the standards for later re-filing, this time the standards were approved.
No changes were made to the standards, and they were submitted exactly the same as at the July hearing, said Andy Ware, an ODA spokesman. However, a more thorough job of presenting testimony on behalf of the standards was done, including testimony by Ohio Farm Bureau Executive Vice President Jack Fisher, Gaylord Barkman with Buckeye Veal Services, veal farmer Jason Warner and Dr. Brad Garrison with the Ohio Veterinarian Medical Association.
Ohio Agriculture Director James Zehringer announced on Aug. 11 that animal care rules developed by the Livestock Care Standards Board will become effective on September 29, 2011.… Continue reading

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USDA seeks comments on the proposed rule for animal disease traceability

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) today issued a proposed rule to establish general regulations for improving the traceability of U.S. livestock moving interstate when animal disease events take place.
“Through the past two years, I have listened carefully to stakeholders throughout the country about how to reach effective animal disease traceability in a transparent manner without additional burden,” said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. “We are proposing a flexible approach in which states and tribes can develop systems for tracing animals that work best for them and for producers in their jurisdiction. This approach offers great flexibility at the state and local level and addresses gaps in our disease response efforts.”
Under the proposed rule, unless specifically exempted, livestock moved interstate would have to be officially identified and accompanied by an interstate certificate of veterinary inspection or other documentation, such as owner-shipper statements or brand certificates.… Continue reading

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Direct marketing meat

Rory Lewandowski, Extension Educator, Athens County and Buckeye Hills EERA

As the interest in locally produced and marketed food grows, livestock owners may find non-farm neighbors and friends asking if they can purchase meat products from them. Possibly livestock owners are wondering how they might add value to their livestock and market some of their livestock as meat to the public. Some basic factors that need to be considered include: regulations regarding meat processing and sales, finding a processor, pricing your product, risk management, and customer relations. In this article I will cover the regulations governing meat processing and sale to the public.

With regard to the regulations regarding meat processing and sale of meat to the public, there are two primary government agencies that are involved. These are the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) and the county Health Department. Meat sold into a public market must come from an approved source.… Continue reading

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