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Ohio’s Crop Progress – May 21st, 2012

OHIO CROP WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS

WEEK ENDING SUNDAY May 20th, 2012

The average temperature for the State was 63.9 degrees, 2.2 degrees above normal for the week ending Sunday, May 20, 2012. Precipitation averaged 0.24 inches, 0.66 inches below normal. There were 107 modified growing degree days, 14 days above normal. Reporters rated 5.5 days suitable for fieldwork during the seven-day period ending Friday, May 18, 2012. Topsoil moisture was rated 1 percent very short, 15 percent short, 75 percent adequate, and 9 percent surplus.

FIELD ACTIVITIES AND CROP PROGRESS

The state saw dry and warm weather for most of the week. Operators took advantage by completing a lot of field work. These activities included planting corn and soybeans, baling hay, spraying nitrogen on emerged corn, and applying herbicides. Reporters still indicated that field conditions were still slightly dryer than usual for this time of year and will need rain in the coming weeks for all the newly planted crops.… Continue reading

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Ohio's Crop Progress – May 21st, 2012

OHIO CROP WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS

WEEK ENDING SUNDAY May 20th, 2012

The average temperature for the State was 63.9 degrees, 2.2 degrees above normal for the week ending Sunday, May 20, 2012. Precipitation averaged 0.24 inches, 0.66 inches below normal. There were 107 modified growing degree days, 14 days above normal. Reporters rated 5.5 days suitable for fieldwork during the seven-day period ending Friday, May 18, 2012. Topsoil moisture was rated 1 percent very short, 15 percent short, 75 percent adequate, and 9 percent surplus.

FIELD ACTIVITIES AND CROP PROGRESS

The state saw dry and warm weather for most of the week. Operators took advantage by completing a lot of field work. These activities included planting corn and soybeans, baling hay, spraying nitrogen on emerged corn, and applying herbicides. Reporters still indicated that field conditions were still slightly dryer than usual for this time of year and will need rain in the coming weeks for all the newly planted crops.… Continue reading

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What causes purple corn?

By Dave Nanda, Director of Genetics and Technology for 
Seed Consultants, Inc.

Many corn fields look purple during the seedling stage? The reasons for the young seedlings to turn purple are as follows:

• Purple leaves are caused by a pigment called anthocyanin. When the sugars produced by the chlorophyll cannot be deposited in roots, stalks and new leaves, sugars are converted to anthocyanin which is red to purple in color.

• Acidic soils with pH lower than 5.5 may cause seedlings purpling. Wet soils can inhibit the nutrient uptake.

• Purpling generally occurs between V2 to V5 stage of growth. By V8, purple leaf syndrome disappears and the color becomes healthy green.

• Any plant stresses which reduce the uptake of phosphorus may result in purple leaves. Root restrictions may cause phosphate deficiency.

• Early planting can cause stress and lead to purpling due to cool nights and warmer days.… Continue reading

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Dairy Farmers: Are you guilty of this cardinal sin?

Hot weather is just around the corner, if it’s not already starting to rear its ugly head in your part of the country. As we head into this time of year the biggest mistake you can make is to be unprepared, says Martha Baker, dairy nutrition specialist with Land O’Lakes Purina Feed.

“This past fall when you turned the sprinklers and fans off, everything probably worked just fine. But that doesn’t mean everything will work fine when you need it,” she says. Baker shares the following tips to be prepared and proactive:

  • Clean and service the fans. Take time to make sure the fans turn on and off at the correct times and/or temperatures.
  • Look at the nozzles and soakers. Ensure they turn on when you want them to, but also make sure enough water comes through when and where you want it too. Double check that you don’t have any broken water lines.
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ACRE/DCP program and SURE enrollment deadlines coming up

The Ohio Farm Service Agency (FSA) would like to remind Ohio producers who have not contacted their local FSA Office about DCP or ACRE enrollment to do so before the sign-up deadline ends.  It is important producers contact their local FSA office to set up appointments before the June 1, 2012, deadline.

All signatures of producers receiving a share in DCP/ACRE payments are required by the June 1, 2012, deadline.

For more information about the DCP/ACRE programs please visit your local FSA office.

June 1, 2012 is also the deadline to apply for assistance for 2010 crop losses under the Supplemental Revenue Assistance Payments (SURE) Program.  The program provides crop disaster assistance payments to eligible producers on farms that have incurred crop production or quality losses.

FSA wants to ensure that all eligible producers are aware of the approaching deadline. SURE covers producers on farms in disaster counties that incurred crop production, crop-quality losses or both, but in order to qualify, farmers need to file in a timely manner. … Continue reading

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Tiny corn plants could cut costs, shrink environmental footprint

Tall, waving corn fields that line Midwestern roads may one day be replaced by dwarfed versions that require less water, fertilizer and other inputs, thanks to a fungicide commonly used on golf courses.

Burkhard Schulz, a Purdue University assistant professor of plant biochemical and molecular genetics, had earlier found that knocking out the steroid function in corn plants would create tiny versions that only had female sex characteristics. But brassinazole, the chemical used to inhibit the plant steroid biosynthesis, was prohibitively expensive.

One gram of brassinazole could cost as much as $25,000, so Schulz started looking into other options. He found that propiconazole, used to treat fungal dollar spot disease on golf courses, is more potent and costs about 10 cents for the same amount.

“Any research where you needed to treat large plants for long periods of time would have been impossible,” Schulz said. “Those tests before would have cost us millions of dollars.… Continue reading

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JOPA relationship built strong soybean market

More than 75 million bushels of whole U.S. soybeans made their way to Japan last year, thanks to strong demand for quality soy. A delegation of U.S. soybean farmers representing the United Soybean Board (USB), the American Soybean Association (ASA) and the U.S. Soybean Export Council (USSEC) are honoring the 50th anniversary of the Japan Oilseed Processors Association (JOPA).

The organization has worked with U.S. soybean farmers to meet demand for U.S. soy in Japan.

“Japan has grown to be one of our most valued customers,” said Vanessa Kummer, USB chair. “Because customers in Japan serve as one of our largest markets abroad, soy ranks as the top U.S. agricultural export and makes a large net contribution to the U.S. agricultural trade balance. The soy checkoff, along with my fellow farmers representing ASA and USSEC, mark this very symbolic milestone with our Japanese customers and remain committed to meeting their soy needs.”… Continue reading

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Syngenta to offer reduced structured refuge stacked trait options to independent seed companies

Syngenta and Dow AgroSciences LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of The Dow Chemical Company, announced today a joint agreement to offer two reduced refuge trait stacks to independent seed companies through Syngenta-owned GreenLeaf Genetics LLC. This agreement will make high-performing trait stacks, beginning with the Agrisure Viptera 3220 and Agrisure 3122 trait stacks, more widely available to U.S. and Canadian corn growers. Inbreds for hybrid combinations will be offered for sale immediately for production this winter.

“With this opportunity, we further demonstrate our dedication to independent seed companies and commitment to providing them advances in trait technologies,” said David Morgan, president of Syngenta Seeds, Inc. “Growers will enjoy greater productivity through reduced refuge and the convenience of purchasing this technology through their local independent seed supplier.”

Under the terms of the agreement, Syngenta’s Agrisure traits and Dow AgroSciences’ Herculex traits will be outlicensed for trait stack combinations through GreenLeaf Genetics, which will serve as the primary contact for independent seed companies.… Continue reading

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Carroll Co. FSA office to become part-time

Farm Service Agency (FSA) Steve Maurer, State Executive Director in Ohio, announced as a result of zero staff at the Carroll County FSA office that it will be converted to a part-time service center effective immediately.

The Carroll County FSA office will be open on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, 8:00 am – 4:00 pm now through July 27th.
Starting July 30th, the Carroll County FSA office will be open Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8:00 am – 4:00 pm.

Reducing the operating hours of the Carroll County FSA Office is a management decision on the part of FSA and is not intended to impact or change the operating hours of other agencies that may be co-located in the USDA Service Center.

To help provide producers with the best possible service please call (330) 339-5585 to schedule an appointment.… Continue reading

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NCBA supports new BSE rule

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) published in the Federal Register a comprehensive rule for Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) on March 16, 2012. The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) voiced support for the rule in comments submitted late Tuesday. NCBA Vice President Bob McCan said the organization has been pushing for this rule since the first case of BSE was detected in the United States in December 2003.

“This has been a long time coming and we certainly welcome this rule. Quite simply, this proposed rule will show the United States is willing to talk the talk and walk the walk with regard to following international standards developed by the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE),” said McCan. “We cannot demand our trading partners follow OIE standards when we are not here at home.”

As noted in the comments submitted by NCBA, the comprehensive BSE rule will solidify the United States’ commitment to basing trade relationships on internationally-recognized, science-based standards.… Continue reading

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Pioneer to sell soybeans by seed count

Pioneer Hi-Bred will sell its soybean products by seed count per unit, rather than by weight, beginning in the fall of 2012 for varieties sold throughout North America for the 2013 planting season. The number of soybean seeds sold per unit by Pioneer will be 140,000.

The advantage for Pioneer customers is that buying by seed count provides a simple, convenient and more accurate means of planning their soybean crop.

“Our customers will benefit because they can more easily calculate the number of units they need based on their desired planting rates because the seed quantity per unit will always be consistent,” said Don Schafer, senior marketing manager, soybeans. “This change is in response to customer demand for consistent seed count packaging for more efficient field-by-field planning.”

Prior to this change, Pioneer sold soybean seeds by weight (50 pounds of seed equals one unit). Soybean seeds can potentially vary in size, based on genetics and growing conditions, affecting the number of seeds per unit.… Continue reading

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U.S. agriculture hails U.S.-Colombia FTA implementation

In a huge victory for U.S. farmers, the United States and Colombia officially implemented on Tuesday a free trade agreement (FTA) first signed in 2006.

The pact immediately ends a significant tariff disadvantage U.S. farmers have faced with their agricultural products. Wheat growers are among the benefactors of the agreement.

“This is a very good day for wheat farmers,” said Randy Suess, a wheat farmer from Colfax, Wash., and chairman of U.S. Wheat Associates (USW). “The tariff situation has basically forced our largest customer, historically, in South America to buy more wheat from Canada and Argentina. Now our customers in Colombia will not have to pay the tariff, and we can compete equally on the basis of quality, supply and service.”

Implementing this FTA is particularly important to U.S. wheat farmers, who rely on exports to market about half of their crops each year. In marketing year 2010/2011, Colombia imported from Gulf and Pacific Northwest tributaries about 800,000 metric tons of U.S.… Continue reading

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Ethanol reduced gas prices by more than $1 in 2011

America’s growing use of domestically-produced ethanol reduced wholesale gasoline prices by an average of $1.09 per gallon in
2011, according to updated research conducted by economics professors at the University of Wisconsin and Iowa State University.  The 2011 results, which are up from an average impact of $0.89 per gallon in 2010, were released today by the Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD).

The new analysis, an update to a 2009 peer-reviewed paper published in Energy Policy by professors Dermot Hayes and Xiaodong Du,  also found gasoline prices have been reduced by an average of $0.29 per gallon, or 17%, from 2000-2011 thanks to  the growing use of ethanol.

“Growth in US ethanol production has added significantly to the volume of fuel available in the US,” said Professor Hayes. “It is as if the
US oil refining industry had found a way to extract 10% more gasoline from a barrel of oil.… Continue reading

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Land O’Lakes Purina Feed Launches Feeding for 30TM Program


Industry-wide initiative highlights need for attention on sow nutrition and management in the U.S. swine sector.

This week, as part of an ongoing commitment to animal nutrition, Land O’Lakes Purina Feed, LLC launches an industry initiative – the Feeding for 30TM Program. This new program builds on the industry goal of achieving 30 pigs per sow per year and aims to promote proper sow management and nutrition practices to boost performance starting in the gestation and farrowing barns and continuing through all growing phases.

Through the Feeding for 30TM Program, Land O’Lakes Purina Feed and other industry experts are offering collaborative insights and management information to swine producers striving to achieve the industry goal of 30 pigs per sow per year. Researchers behind the program explain that meeting the benchmark of 30 pigs per sow per year has economic and herd health benefits. Sow nutrition is highlighted as a priority to meet the industry goal while maintaining longevity within herds.… Continue reading

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Ohio’s Crop Progress – May 14th, 2012

WEEK ENDING SUNDAY May 13th, 2012

The average temperature for the State was 60.1 degrees, 1.5 degrees above normal for the week ending Sunday, May 13, 2012. Precipitation averaged 1.23 inches, 0.43 inches above normal. There were 83 modified growing degree days, 4 days above normal. Reporters rated 2.7 days suitable for fieldwork during the seven-day period ending Friday, May 11, 2012. Topsoil moisture was rated 0 percent very short, 4 percent short, 65 percent adequate, and 31 percent surplus.

FIELD ACTIVITIES AND CROP PROGRESS

Temperatures and precipitation for the State were higher than normal. Most of the precipitation came in variable, yet strong rains.
Reporters still indicated that field conditions were still slightly dryer than usual for this time of year. Warmer temperatures this year have caused an increase in insect pressure. Field activities for the week included hauling grain, green chopping forage, applying nitrogen to corn, fungicide to wheat, and spraying herbicides.… Continue reading

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Ohio's Crop Progress – May 14th, 2012

WEEK ENDING SUNDAY May 13th, 2012

The average temperature for the State was 60.1 degrees, 1.5 degrees above normal for the week ending Sunday, May 13, 2012. Precipitation averaged 1.23 inches, 0.43 inches above normal. There were 83 modified growing degree days, 4 days above normal. Reporters rated 2.7 days suitable for fieldwork during the seven-day period ending Friday, May 11, 2012. Topsoil moisture was rated 0 percent very short, 4 percent short, 65 percent adequate, and 31 percent surplus.

FIELD ACTIVITIES AND CROP PROGRESS

Temperatures and precipitation for the State were higher than normal. Most of the precipitation came in variable, yet strong rains.
Reporters still indicated that field conditions were still slightly dryer than usual for this time of year. Warmer temperatures this year have caused an increase in insect pressure. Field activities for the week included hauling grain, green chopping forage, applying nitrogen to corn, fungicide to wheat, and spraying herbicides.… Continue reading

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The direction of the corn market still unfolding

The USDA’s projections of U.S. and world corn and feed grain supply-and-demand conditions presented in the May World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) report set the benchmark by which the corn market will judge unfolding events. According to a University of Illinois agricultural economist, those events are continually unfolding, with some of the more important ones to be revealed this summer. “Among the factors to be revealed over the next few months, two of the most important are the rate of domestic feed and residual use and the prospective size of the 2012 U.S. crop,” said Darrel Good. “Feed and residual use of corn during the current marketing year is projected at 4.55 billion bushels. Use during the first half of the year, as implied by the quarterly stocks estimates, totaled 3.39 billion bushels. To reach the projection for the year, use during the last half of the year will need to total 1.16 billion bushels, about the same as was consumed during the same period last year.… Continue reading

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Farmers plan to thank Domino’s Pizza this weekend for supporting them

In April Domino’s Pizza shareholders rejected a resolution proposed by the Humane Society of the United States to require its pork suppliers to stop housing sows in gestation stalls. In fact 80% of shareholders voted against the resolution.  A Domino’s spokesperson says the company relies on animal experts to determine the best way to raise an animal that’s used for food.

The farming community is rallying together this weekend to thank Domino’s Pizza shareholders for choosing to consider the welfare of farm animals over the cries of an extremist group. Farmers are encouraging everyone to order Domino’s Pizza this weekend, May 18-20 as a way to thank Domino’s Pizza for standing with America’s farmers.

The blog The Truth About Agriculture started a Facebook Group, Farmers Paying it Forward with Pizza where you can show your support.

Missouri hog farmer and agvocate  Chris Chinnput forth the idea last week in a blog post she wrote for Just Farmers.… Continue reading

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Farmers plan to thank Domino's Pizza this weekend for supporting them

In April Domino’s Pizza shareholders rejected a resolution proposed by the Humane Society of the United States to require its pork suppliers to stop housing sows in gestation stalls. In fact 80% of shareholders voted against the resolution.  A Domino’s spokesperson says the company relies on animal experts to determine the best way to raise an animal that’s used for food.

The farming community is rallying together this weekend to thank Domino’s Pizza shareholders for choosing to consider the welfare of farm animals over the cries of an extremist group. Farmers are encouraging everyone to order Domino’s Pizza this weekend, May 18-20 as a way to thank Domino’s Pizza for standing with America’s farmers.

The blog The Truth About Agriculture started a Facebook Group, Farmers Paying it Forward with Pizza where you can show your support.

Missouri hog farmer and agvocate  Chris Chinnput forth the idea last week in a blog post she wrote for Just Farmers.… Continue reading

Read More »

Study shows cows prefer grazing clean grass

 

GPS Collars Help Missouri Researcher Track Grazing Preferences.

A recent study by Kevin Bradley, University of Missouri Extension weed scientist, confirms that cattle prefer clean, weed-free grass when given the choice.
The study tracked grazing patterns across three continuously grazed locations in Missouri. A mix of broadleaf weeds or broadleaf weeds and woody brush infested each site, which ranged from 50 to 100 acres in size.

“We sprayed half of each pasture with herbicides and left the other half untreated,” Bradley says. Depending on the undesirable species present, the site received an application of GrazonNext herbicide or a tank mix of Grazon P+D plus Remedy Ultra herbicide. The herbicide treatment eliminated most of the clover.
A month before spraying, Bradley established the baseline. He fitted three cows at each site with GPS collars to track grazing habits. A special, up-down indicator on the collars documented when the cows were actively grazing.… Continue reading

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