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Near normal rainfall in the forecast

By Jim Noel, National Weather Service

There is some good news going forward. Above normal temperatures will continue for the rest of July into August but the hottest weather is behind us. Rainfall will see some improvement with near normal rainfall possible the next two weeks. Drought conditions appear to have bottomed and some improvement is now possible.

Outlook Week 1 through July 28: Above normal temperatures with near normal rainfall. Normal highs are in the 80s and normal lows in the 60s. Normal rainfall is near 1 inch. Most of this week will see highs in the 80s northeast to 90s southwest. There is a chance of above normal rainfall with the preferred area in the east half of the state where 1 to 3 inches is forecast. Normal to below normal rainfall will occur in the west with 0.50 to 1.50 inches for a state average of near normal.… Continue reading

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Aquaculture conference next month

People interested in learning business strategies to develop and maintain a healthy and sustainable fish farming operation can do so during a conference on aquaculture offered by a group of educators, including those from Ohio State University Extension.

The conference, “Planning for Aquaculture Business Success,” will be held Aug. 6-7 in the meeting rooms at Cabela’s Inc., an outdoor retail store at 110 Cabelas Blvd. East, in Dundee, Mich. The event will highlight sound financial practices and innovative approaches in the aquaculture industry, said Laura Tiu, an aquaculture specialist for OSU Extension.

The conference, which is free and open to the public, is offered through a partnership with the Ohio Aquaculture Research and Development Center at OSU South Centers; the National Aquaculture Association with funding from the United Soybean Board; the North Central Regional Aquaculture Center; the Nature Conservancy; Michigan Sea Grant; the Michigan Aquaculture Association; and the Ohio Aquaculture Association.… Continue reading

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Ohio State Fair sees increase in Jr. Fair livestock entries, changes made to beef show

By: Heather Hetterick

This year you’ll see more animals in the poultry and rabbit barns.

“We are up overall in our junior livestock entries,” Alicia Shoults, Marketing & Public Relations Director for the Ohio State Fair said. “Poultry is up with the most. We have  79  more entries this year in the junior show so we are up to  714 total entries in poultry.”

The open poultry show has more than 500 additional entry’s this year.

Rabbits entries are up significantly as well.

“Rabbits are up 55, which is a significant jump, so we’re up to 527 entries,” Shoults said.

Hogs, sheep, beef and horse entries remain around the same.

Shoults said there are more than 1,600 hogs and 1,300 lambs entered in each of those Jr. Fair shows.

The Jr. Fair beef show will see several changes this year.

There will be four additional heifer divisions, Lim-Flex, MaineTainer, ShorthornPlus and Percentage Simmental, that will be eligible to compete in the supreme champion beef breeding female competition on Saturday, Aug.… Continue reading

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Taking cover crops to the next level

By Matt Reese

For Dave Brandt, the soil-building benefits of cover crops have been addictive. He is constantly experimenting to find new ways to build the soils on his Fairfield County farm.

Brandt is also very willing to share what he has learned with others. As farmers look to expand beyond the cover crop basics, there are other things to consider, Brandt said.

“Any legume cover needs the right inoculant. Soybean inoculant is only for soybeans,” he said. “Each crop has its own inoculant and, without the right inoculant, you have wasted you money on cover crop seed. Make sure your seed supplier can answer your questions.”

It is also important to adjust management details for the specifics of the farm. Brandt has been able to ratchet down his fertilizer and herbicide use on the farm, but does not suggest making major changes right away.

“These are the kinds of things you tweak as you go along based on what you are seeing in your fields,” he said.… Continue reading

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Ohio’s Crop Progress – July 23rd, 2012

FIELD ACTIVITIES AND CROP PROGRESS WEEK ENDING SUNDAY JULY 22nd, 2012

Conditions throughout the state remain hot and dry. The heat and dry weather during the last number of weeks has continued to put significant stress on both crops and livestock. There has been more rain this week, some areas throughout the state report 1-2 partial days of rain; however topsoil moisture is still far below normal conditions. Field activities for the week were baling hay, harvesting oats, spraying, mowing CRP, and manure application to wheat fallow acres.

As of Sunday July 22nd, 82 percent of corn was silked (tasseled), which was 59 percent ahead of last year and 28 percent ahead of the five-year average. Corn in dough was rated at 12 percent, ahead of both last week by nine percent and the five-year average by eight percent. The soybean crop was 78 percent blooming, compared to 32 percent last year and 60 percent for the five-year average.Continue reading

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Ohio's Crop Progress – July 23rd, 2012

FIELD ACTIVITIES AND CROP PROGRESS WEEK ENDING SUNDAY JULY 22nd, 2012

Conditions throughout the state remain hot and dry. The heat and dry weather during the last number of weeks has continued to put significant stress on both crops and livestock. There has been more rain this week, some areas throughout the state report 1-2 partial days of rain; however topsoil moisture is still far below normal conditions. Field activities for the week were baling hay, harvesting oats, spraying, mowing CRP, and manure application to wheat fallow acres.

As of Sunday July 22nd, 82 percent of corn was silked (tasseled), which was 59 percent ahead of last year and 28 percent ahead of the five-year average. Corn in dough was rated at 12 percent, ahead of both last week by nine percent and the five-year average by eight percent. The soybean crop was 78 percent blooming, compared to 32 percent last year and 60 percent for the five-year average.Continue reading

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SW Ohio Corn Growers meet in August

The Southwest Ohio Corn Growers Association and the Fayette County Agronomy Committee in collaboration with the Ohio State University Extension will hold their annual field day on August 14,2012 at the Fayette County Demonstration Farm, 2770 SR 38, Washington Court House, Ohio. Registration begins at 9:30 AM, and the educational program starts at 10:00 AM.

This year’s topics include:

10:00 & 10:45 AM, Corn and Soybean Responses to Environment and Climate Change: David Rosenthal PhD, University of Illinois and Soil Density and Compaction: Bill Lehmkuhl, Precision Agri. Services.

10:45 – 11:45 AM, Seeding Rate Adjustments to Optimize Corn Performance: Peter Thomison PhD, Ohio State University.

11:45 AM – 12:45 PM, Weed Resistance-It’s Not Going Away: Mark Loux PhD, Ohio State University.

All Day – Cover Crop Management and Plot Tour: David Brandt, Brandt Farms.

This year’s featured speaker will be the Chip Bowling, NCGA Corn Board Member – Water Quality and Fertilizer Use in the Chesapeake Bay region.… Continue reading

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Sprayer workshop

Herbicide, insecticide, fungicide and foliar fertilizer applicators can get an updated look at the most efficient and effective application equipment and techniques available in agriculture during an upcoming workshop offered by the Ohio State University Extension’s Agronomic Crops Team.

Sprayer Demonstration and Technology Day will be Aug. 8 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Fulton County Fairgrounds on State Route 108, Wauseon. The program, which is free and open to the public, will offer participants the opportunity to learn how to save money, time and effort when spraying fields, said Greg LaBarge, agronomic systems field specialist, and one of the leaders of the OSU Agronomic Crops Team.

“Whether a new sprayer is in your farm’s future or you are looking to get a few more years out of your current sprayer, you will find some hints and tips to get the most benefit from your spray applications,” he said.… Continue reading

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Getting started in cover crops

By Matt Reese

While most farmers were toying with tillage innovations, Dave Brandt was focused on no-till on his Fairfield County farm. As more farmers focused on reducing tillage, Brandt worked with cover crop experiments. And, now that cover crops are on the radar of more

farmers for the soil health, conservation and yield benefits, Brandt again finds himself well ahead of the curve on his 1,100-acre farm.

He has been planting cover crops (other than wheat) since the late 1970s, but he remains as excited as ever about keeping beneficial crops on his farm ground outside of the confines of the normal Ohio growing season. In his farm office, Brandt scrolls through photos on his computer with the zeal of a man just starting the learning curve of cover crops.

“Look at that, isn’t that pretty?” Brandt said of a photo of a field filled with crimson clover on a farm off farm near a lake.… Continue reading

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NIAA to host antibiotics symposium in Columbus

By Matt Reese

To build on the success of their first conference focused on antibiotics in 2011, the National Institute for Animal Agriculture is hosting a second conference on the topic this November in Columbus.

“A one health approach to antimicrobial use and resistance: A dialogue for a common purpose” will be held Nov. 13-15 at the Hilton Polaris Hotel in Columbus. Ohio presents a great forum for the symposium for a number of reasons.

“Columbus is an excellent choice for this. One of the main reasons for this is that we have seven health colleges here at Ohio State on one campus. There are no other universities that can say that,” said Leah Dorman, DVM, director of food programs, Center for Food and Animal Issues for the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation and symposium co-chair. “And, Lonnie King, who is the dean of the OSU veterinary school and the coordinator between these seven health colleges, is so knowledgeable in the topic of one health with antibiotics.”… Continue reading

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AFBF sides against EPA in poultry suit

Taking aim at the Environmental Protection Agency in support of a Farm Bureau member, the American Farm Bureau Federation on Thursday filed a motion to intervene in a lawsuit concerning EPA’s authority to regulate poultry and livestock farms under the Clean Water Act. AFBF filed to intervene on the side of West Virginia poultry grower Lois Alt, who brought suit to challenge an EPA order demanding that Alt obtain an unnecessary and costly CWA discharge permit. AFBF was joined in the motion by the West Virginia Farm Bureau.

Alt sued EPA in June after the agency ordered her to obtain a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System discharge permit. EPA’s order threatens Alt with $37,500 in daily fines for storm water that may come into contact with dust, feathers or dander deposited on the ground outside of poultry house ventilation fans, or small amounts of manure that may be present in the farmyard as a result of normal poultry farming operations.… Continue reading

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EPA announces restrictions on Lorsban

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced new restrictions on the use of chlorpyrifos, known as Lorsban, in response to a petition filed by the Natural Resources Defense Council and the Pesticide Action Network North America, which asked EPA to revoke all tolerances and cancel all registrations of chlorpyrifos. In a partial response addressing the first six of 10 petition claims, EPA has found that none of the claims warrants revoking tolerances or canceling registrations for chlorpyrifos at this time.

ASA submitted comments on the petition last October, with then-President Alan Kemper writing, “Soybean farmers rely on chlorpyrifos as a safe, effective, and reliable tool for insect control.” ASA’s comments pointed out that “from 2001-2009, nearly 8,000 individual samples of drinking water were analyzed for chlorpyrifos by USDA’s Pesticide Data Program. There was not a single detection of chlorpyrifos or chlorpyrifos-specific breakdown products.”

Under the new label requirements, maximum aerial application rates are being significantly reduced from about 6 pounds per acre to about 2 pounds per acre.… Continue reading

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Ohio State Agencies launch the Ohio Clean Lakes Initiative

Three state agencies jointly launched the Ohio Clean Lakes Initiative, a program geared to improve water quality and reduce Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) in the Western Basin of Lake Erie. HABs are threatening the ecological integrity and economic impact of Lake Erie, one of Ohio’s most precious natural resources.

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources, the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA) developed this initiative based on the findings of a report the agencies released in March.

“Agriculture is important to Ohio — it is the No. 1 industry in our state,” said ODA Director David Daniels. “The Ohio Clean Lakes Initiative focuses on reducing excess nutrients in our waterways resulting not only from agriculture, but from a variety of urban and residential sources, such as sewage overflow. Together our agencies believe we can address the challenges facing Ohio’s waterways through this program.”

The Directors’ Agricultural Nutrients and Water Quality Working Group report includes recommendations for the implementation of a 4R Nutrient Stewardship program, which promotes using the right fertilizer source, at the right rate, at the right time, with the right placement.… Continue reading

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Manure Science Review August 9th

Reducing phosphorus runoff, a concern related to protecting water quality and preventing harmful algae blooms, will be just one of the topics when Ohio State University presents Manure Science Review 2012 on Aug. 9 in northwest Ohio.

The event is an educational program for anyone involved in the handling, management or utilization of livestock waste, including farmers, Extension educators, government personnel, certified crop advisers and professional nutrient applicators. Featured will be expert speakers from Ohio State and from state and federal agencies.

Among the topics to be discussed will be using liquid manure in ways that increase the application window; using swine or dairy manure to side dress corn; best practices and systems for composting livestock mortality; using settling tanks to separate swine manure; using tile drainage to limit nutrient runoff; using draglines to inject manure nutrients; and using cover crops to reduce erosion and increase nutrient retention.

OSU Extension Educator Greg LaBarge, who is also one of the leaders of the OSU Agronomic Crops Team, will discuss on-farm practices that can reduce phosphorus runoff from liquid manure and poultry litter, including timing and mass balance considerations.… Continue reading

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PTNR with Russia moves forward

The American Soybean Association (ASA) congratulates the Senate Finance Committee on its unanimous passage today of a draft bill that would establish permanent normal trade relations (PNTR) with Russia, the world’s sixth largest economy. ASA now encourages the Senate to take up the bill as quickly as possible, and calls on the House to move forward with a companion bill in order for the U.S. to capitalize on Russia’s accession package to the World Trade Organization (WTO). Importing more than $770 million in meat, poultry, egg and dairy products in 2011, Russia is an important market for the U.S. soy industry.
“Today’s unanimous passage of the draft bill establishing PNTR with Russia is a very encouraging move by the Senate Finance Committee, and we congratulate Committee Chairman Baucus and Ranking Member Hatch on their work to solidify U.S. business opportunities abroad,” said ASA President Steve Wellman, a soybean farmer from Syracuse, Neb.
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