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Ohio's Crop Progress Report – September 12th

OHIO CROP WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS

WEEK ENDING SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 11th 2011

The average temperature for the State was 63.9 degrees, 3.7 degrees below normal for the week ending Sunday, September 11, 2011. Precipitation averaged 1.75 inches, 1.23 inches above normal. There were 100 modified growing degree days, 26 days below normal. Reporters rated 2.3 days suitable for fieldwork during the seven-day period ending Friday, September 9, 2011. Topsoil moisture was rated 0 percent very short, 10 percent short, 69 percent adequate, and 21 percent surplus.

FIELD ACTIVITIES AND CROP PROGRESS

Rains this week helped to revive crops, but prevented some field work. Those able to get into fields tilled wheat stubble, planted cover crops, hauled manure, and began corn harvest for silage.

As of Sunday September 11th, corn in dough was 93 percent, which was seven percent behind 2010 and three percent behind the five-year average. Corn dented was 56 percent, compared to 89 percent last year and 79 percent for the five-year average.… Continue reading

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OARDC to open a new agrosecurity research facility

Ohio State University’s Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) will unveil Sept. 16 a unique, highly secure bio-containment building aimed at enhancing its nationally and internationally recognized research programs on infectious diseases of plants and animals — and further safeguarding Ohio’s $90-plus billion agricultural industry.



The $22.2 million Plant and Animal Agrosecurity Research (PAAR) Facility will enable scientists on the Wooster campus to work with infectious agents classified by federal standards at the BSL-3 (biosafety level 3) and BSL-3 Agriculture safety levels. PAAR will be the first facility in Ohio and one of only two nationally with capacity for both plant and animal research at such safety levels.



“PAAR is a unique facility that will allow Ohio State to proactively address plant and animal pests that threaten our food and green industries in Ohio,” OARDC Director Steve Slack said. “We will now be able to initiate research to provide solutions on new and emerging problems before they cause significant losses, and will be able to attract the resources necessary to develop these solutions.”

… Continue reading

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Question the Authorities at FSR

Experts from Ohio State University’s Department of Agricultural, Environmental and Development Economics will present a series of updates on the agricultural economy, commodity markets and policy issues at the 2011 Farm Science Review, Sept. 20-22 at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center near London.

“Our ‘Question the Authorities’ sessions focus on the current economy and its effect on agriculture, broadly defined,” said Stan Ernst, OSU Extensionoutreach program leader. “We have a little extra this year related to energy and we’ll do some presentations on alternative enterprise examples, also.”

The Question the Authorities sessions are a staple of Extension’s educational offerings at Farm Science Review. Sessions run daily beginning at 9 a.m. at 426 Friday Ave. as part of OSU Central.

For corn, wheat and soybean producers, the Department’s popular grain marketing outlook presentations are offered three times each day of the Review. The program also features sessions on input costs, farmland values and cash rents, as well as sessions on estate planning and farm transfer issues.… Continue reading

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Bob Evans pledges $10,000 to Animals for Life Foundation

Bob Evans Farms has pledged $10,000 to the Animals for Life Foundation, a 501(c)3 charitable organization working to educate the public about the value animals bring to human life and the care people give their animals.

“Animals are an important part of our lives in many ways, for many reasons, for many purposes,” said Mike Townsley, President of Bob Evans’ Food Products Division. “We support a common sense discussion on the human-animal bond where animals receive quality care regardless of their ultimate purpose.”

The Animals for Life Foundation was founded in 2009, and in its first two years, it has supported programs including two therapy dog programs: one for elementary school children and one for children with autism, a farm animal handling program for first responders, a Season’s Harvest event in Medina County that benefits the local animal shelter and an animal behavior, welfare and husbandry career event sponsored by Ohio FFA.… Continue reading

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Obama's American Jobs Act

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack visited The Ohio State University to highlight President Obama’s speech on the American Jobs Act and what it means to Ohioans. Secretary Vilsack met with leaders from The Ohio State University and from the local business community to discuss the Administration’s strategy to strengthen the U.S. economy.

Specifically, the American Jobs Act:

• Cuts the payroll tax in half to 3.1% for employers on the first $5 million in wages, providing broad tax relief to all businesses but targeting it to the 98 percent of firms with wages below this level. In Ohio, 200,000 firms will receive a payroll tax cut under the American Jobs Act.

 

• Includes $50 billion in immediate investments for highways, transit, rail and aviation, helping to modernize an infrastructure that now receives a grade of “D” from the American Society of Civil Engineers and putting hundreds of thousands of construction workers back on the job.… Continue reading

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Obama’s American Jobs Act

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack visited The Ohio State University to highlight President Obama’s speech on the American Jobs Act and what it means to Ohioans. Secretary Vilsack met with leaders from The Ohio State University and from the local business community to discuss the Administration’s strategy to strengthen the U.S. economy.

Specifically, the American Jobs Act:

• Cuts the payroll tax in half to 3.1% for employers on the first $5 million in wages, providing broad tax relief to all businesses but targeting it to the 98 percent of firms with wages below this level. In Ohio, 200,000 firms will receive a payroll tax cut under the American Jobs Act.

 

• Includes $50 billion in immediate investments for highways, transit, rail and aviation, helping to modernize an infrastructure that now receives a grade of “D” from the American Society of Civil Engineers and putting hundreds of thousands of construction workers back on the job.… Continue reading

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VIDEO – Ag Secretary Vilsack Visits Ohio State

Friday, Ag Secretary Tom Vilsack met with leaders from The Ohio State University and from the local business community whose research is producing biobased products and creating new job opportunities. In January, the USDA Certified Biobased Product label was launched so customers know when they are buying a biobased product, thereby creating economic opportunity for businesses producing these products. The label identifies biobased products composed wholly or significantly of agricultural ingredients-renewable plant, animal, marine or forestry materials. Biobased products help add value to commodities, create jobs in rural communities, and increase U.S. energy independence by reducing the use of petroleum in manufactured products.

 … Continue reading

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Fall grazing management

By Rory Lewandowski, Extension educator, Athens County and Buckeye Hills EERA

September and October are important months in the lifecycle of perennial cool season pasture plants because this is when those plants store carbohydrate reserves. Carbohydrate reserves are needed to allow the plant to survive the winter. Although the top growth of the plant will die, the crown and root system of the plant remain alive, continue to respire, and require “food” in the form of carbohydrates. There must be enough carbohydrates stored up to allow the plant to last through the winter and to send out new top growth in the spring.

Carbohydrates are manufactured in the plant through the process of photosynthesis. In order to produce and store up these necessary carbohydrate reserves, the plant must have green living leaf tissue. Therefore, your job as a grazing manager in the fall of the year is to make sure that pasture paddocks are not over grazed and that adequate plant leaf area is maintained.… Continue reading

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Harvest provides opportunities for weed evaluation

Take advantage of the elevated view from the combine cab to survey and assess the effectiveness of your weed management program this fall.

“A field free of weeds during harvest is very desirable and represents an outcome that will require increased management as weeds continue to adapt to modern crop production practices,” said Aaron Hager, University of Illinois Extension weed specialist.

Many observations have been made recently that waterhemp and horseweed are frequently appearing in corn and soybean fields across Illinois. Hager’s recent field visits have indicated that seed production on these mature plants has been successful, suggesting a preharvest herbicide application may do little to reduce the viability of these mature seeds.

“There are many reasons that these two particular weed species have successfully completed their life cycle in corn and soybean fields,” he said. “One reason is the occurrence of herbicide resistance. Glyphosate resistance in Illinois waterhemp and horseweed populations is known to occur, and we suspect this will become increasingly common in future growing seasons.… Continue reading

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Grain value chain collaboration

The National Corn Growers Association and the American Soybean Association brought together key industry stakeholders to start a discussion about how to best begin construction of a framework for addressing biotech events and impacts on end use markets. Acknowledging that all parts of the value chain share a common goal of an uninterrupted flow of corn, soybeans and technology, attendees shared ideas and insights on finding a solution to disruptions that could potentially impact growers.

NCGA CEO Rick Tolman said NCGA and ASA chose to host this meeting to provide the entire industry with an open space in which to find ways to improve communication. Following Tolman’s remarks, NCGA President Bart Schott addressed the conference on the organizations’ goals for the dialogue. In doing so, he noted that each party plays a role in on-farm profitability and, as such, a valuable one for growers across the country. He stressed the importance of recognizing one another’s strengths and working collaboratively to build a bright future.… Continue reading

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Saving lives by teaching farm safety

Farm safety will be a point of discussion at the Farm Science Review on Tuesday, Sept. 20 in London, Ohio. Megan Buechner, the Ohio Farm Safety 4 Just Kids outreach coordinator, will present various farm safety topics to the group in the Cargill booth.

According to the National Safety Council, agriculture is the nation’s most dangerous industry. Nearly one year ago a 10-year-old in Mercer County died of suffocation in a grain wagon. Three months later, a 16-year-old Darke County boy died after a piece of his clothing caught in a piece of machinery.

“The tragedies in Ohio the past year have really stressed the importance of farm safety, especially for kids,” Buechner said. “They don’t always see things on the farm as potentially dangerous.”

September 18-24 is National Farm Safety and Health Week and serves to raise awareness of the dangers in rural areas. Wednesday, Sept. 21 is devoted to farm safety for youth.… Continue reading

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South Centers at Piketon celebrating 20 years

The Ohio State University South Centers at Piketon are celebrating two decades of diversifying agriculture and promoting economic development in southern Ohio, and want to share this milestone with area residents, friends and clientele past and present at a Sept. 15 open house.

Supported by both OSU Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC), the South Centers are engaged in a variety of research and outreach activities in aquaculture; fruit and vegetable production and marketing; soil, water and bioenergy crop trials; and business incubation.

“We will recount past projects and recognize all the dedicated staff members and partners who have contributed to the South Centers’ work over the years,” said South Centers Director Tom Worley. “We will also showcase our ongoing Extension and research projects with tours and exhibits, and welcome the opportunity to host those who have experienced our programs in the past as well as visitors interested in seeing our facilities and programs for the very first time.”… Continue reading

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Food prices on the rise

Food prices will continue to rise for the remainder of this year and well into 2012 because processors now are beginning to pass along higher costs of commodities to consumers, a Purdue University agricultural economist says.

While world grain stocks diminished amid growing demand, drought and flooding, food prices did not significantly increase for most of 2009 and 2010 even though prices that processors pay for raw ingredients such as corn and soybeans did, Corinne Alexander said.

That is changing.

“The question is not whether costs at the grocery store will increase, it’s when,” she said.

Higher commodity prices do not always immediately result in higher food prices, Alexander said. The prices of finished food products abundant in the marketplace might not increase substantially, as has been the case this year with cheese.

But when grain supplies are tight as they are now, grocery shoppers eventually will see the increases at the cash register.… Continue reading

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Coverage of Warner Seeds Field Day

On Wednesday, The Ohio Ag Net’s Ty Higgins made his way to Bradford, Ohio in Miami County for the Warner Seeds Field Day.

Seed Consultants Director of Agronomic Services Bill Mullen says this week’s rain is good and bad, depending on the crop.

Bill Mullen

Warner Seeds Co-Owner Dan Warner discusses the process of processing seed corn.

Dan Warner

Seed Consultants Operations Manager Daniel Call talks about next year’s availability.

Daniel Call

Matt Hutchenson is a Research Assistant for Seed Consultants and he shares what he is seeing in this year’s plots.

Matt Hutchenson

 Seed Consutants Founder Chris Jeffries notes why his company is set apart from the competition.

Chris JeffriesContinue reading

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Ohio Farmers Union supports efforts to repeal S.B. 5

The Ohio Farmers Union came out in support of efforts to repeal S.B. 5 — the unfair attack on Ohio public worker rights.

“I would urge every Ohio voter to vote ‘no’ on State Issue 2 in the fall. Senate Bill 5 was an over-reach on the part of the governor and the Ohio General Assembly. Police, fire fighters, teachers, and other public workers are not the source of Ohio’s economic problems,” said Roger Wise, OFU president. “It’s really incredible that supporters of S.B. 5 would use economic arguments to attack the rights of workers to collectively bargain when we live in the context of an American economy that has been brutal on workers and the middle class for the past several years. Our state and our nation suffer from a complex set of challenges, including destructive trade policy, inadequate regulation of Wall Street, and the general failure of multinational corporations to reinvest in America.”… Continue reading

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Farm income looking up in 2011

High worldwide grain demand coupled with lower-than-expected yields means U.S. farmers can look forward to a record-high farm income total from the 2011 crop, according to a new U.S. Department of Agriculture report.

In the Farm Sector Income Forecast released in late August, USDA’s Economic Research Service projected the total U.S. farm income will reach $103.6 billion – up 31% from last year’s total. The previous farm income record was $84.7 billion in 2004.

“These are not just records, but records that are substantially higher than we’ve seen before,” said Chris Hurt, Purdue Extension agricultural economist.

Both crop and livestock revenues are up in 2011, but Hurt said, the income totals don’t tell the whole story. Input costs are on the rise, as well.

“USDA estimates producers have put 15% more into the cost of inputs,” he said. “So, we have crop revenues up 20% and livestock up 16%. That says profit margins expanded in 2011.”… Continue reading

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Ohio Crop Progress Report – September 6, 2011

As of Sunday September 4th, corn in dough was 85 percent, which was 14 percent behind 2010 and 7 percent behind the five-year average. Corn dented was 37 percent, compared to 79 percent last year and 64 percent for the five-year average. Corn mature was 3 percent, which was 19 percent behind last year and 6 percent behind the five-year average. Corn for silage was 12 percent harvested, which was 37 percent behind last year and 17 percent behind the five-year average. Ninety-seven percent of soybeans were setting pods, compared to 100 percent for both last year and the five-year average. Soybeans dropping leaves were 3 percent, which was 23 percent behind last year and 12 percent behind the five-year average. The third cutting of alfalfa hay was 89 percent complete, compared to 94 percent last year and 90 percent for the five-year average. Twenty-five percent of the fourth cutting of alfalfa hay was complete, 11 percent behind last year, and 1 percent behind the five-year average.… Continue reading

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Sheep shearing school

Do you want to learn to shear sheep or know someone who does?  Do you want to learn to shear sheep so that you can either shear your own flock or you want to learn for a little extra cash? Here is your opportunity.  A Statewide Sheep Shearing School will be held Saturday and Sunday, October 1-2, 2011 from 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. at the Dave Cable Farm, 10491 Canal Rd., Hebron, OH 43025.  There will be no class size limit and the cost is $40 per student to help defray the costs of the school.  Payment must be returned with registration form by Friday, September 23, 2011.  If you decide to register after that date, please call Roger A. High at (614)246-8299 or via email at rhigh@ofbf.org.  If you have questions, please call Roger A. High at (614) 246-8299 or via email at rhigh@ofbf.org.  The instructor for the sheep shearing school is professional sheep shearer, Bob Taylor. 
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Logan County Top of Ohio ag tour

Mark your calendar for Sunday, September 18, 2011, for the Top of Ohio Drive-It-Yourself Ag Tour to be held in Logan County, Ohio. This is a free event open to the public from 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. featuring the southeast quadrant of the county.

Start your day off at the Logan County Farm Bureau’s “Taste of Logan County” which will take place at the Logan County Fairgrounds (Grange Building) between 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Cost of the lunch is $.50 which represents the amount the farmer would receive for production of the food.

From there, feel free to visit as many or all of the stops on the tour. In no particular order, the stops are as follows:

Warne Farms. Jim & Leslie Warne raise registered Shorthorn cattle on their farm, The Oaks, located on County Road 1, Bellefontaine. In the 80’s, they got started in beef cattle by way of their children’s 4-H projects.… Continue reading

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Research boosting productivity of cellulosic ethanol

Adding a pretreatment step would allow producers to get more ethanol from switchgrass harvested in the fall, according to a Purdue University study.

Michael Ladisch, a distinguished professor of agricultural and biological engineering, and Youngmi Kim, a research scientist, compared switchgrass based on growing location, harvest time and whether it was given a pretreatment step. They found that location wasn’t important, but the other two factors could significantly increase the amount of ethanol obtained from the feedstock.

“Switchgrass harvested in the spring had more cellulose, but also more lignin,” said Kim, whose findings were published in the early online version of the journal Bioresource Technology. “You do not get the advantage of the increased cellulose content because it’s more difficult to extract those sugars because of the lignin.”

Lignin, a rigid substance found in plant cell walls, is one of the most significant problems with cellulosic ethanol production. Besides the harvest time, a pretreatment step – cooking switchgrass in hot water under pressure for about 10 minutes – would also help work around lignin.… Continue reading

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