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World’s Largest Combine Clinic attracts big crowd

J D Equipment is proud to announce that its 4th annual World’s Largest Combine Clinic, held on Friday, August 23 at their London location, was among the most successful events ever organized by the company.

Since its inception in 2010, the World’s Largest Combine Clinic has become a comprehensive seasonal review of many subjects relevant to combine owners and the fall harvest. This year’s event welcomed over 350 guests from across Ohio and surrounding states.

Participants at the World’s Largest Combine Clinic attended classes focused on various functions of jd equipment john deere combineJohn Deere combines and related products. Topics covered included S-Series combines, Flex Drapers, Platforms, Corn Heads, AMS / Integrated Solutions, and 50-60-70 Series Combines and Separators. Classes were offered both in morning and afternoon sessions — allowing patrons to customize their experience to fit their daily schedule.

In conjunction with the course offerings, participants were given the opportunity to inspect equipment and present questions to the class instructors.… Continue reading

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Soybean checkoff urging farmers to take action

The international survey of herbicide-resistant weeds says there are 143 different weed species resistant to herbicides in the United States. A recent soy checkoff survey, however, shows most U.S. soybean farmers consider herbicide-resistant weeds to be an issue that will have only a minimal effect on their profitability. Many of those farmers also believe the weeds will require future, rather than immediate, action.

But the soy checkoff sees these weeds as a major problem that needs to be addressed soon. That’s why the checkoff developed the Take Action program  to increase farmer awareness of the potential damage from herbicide-resistant weeds and recommend courses of action.

“We’ve kind of relied on Roundup technology for several years,” said United Soybean Board member Todd Gibson.Continue reading

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United Producers Inc. hires Mike Bumgarner as Chief Operating Officer

United Producers Inc. (UPI), which operates livestock marketing facilities throughout the Midwest and is headquartered in Columbus has hired long-tenured agriculture leader Mike Bumgarner as its chief operating officer.

Bumgarner, who previously spent nearly 20 years with UPI, will return to the company in mid-September. Most recently, Bumgarner spent four years at the helm of the Ohio Farm Bureau’s Center for Food and Animal Issues as vice president. The Center was created in 2009 to engage farmers, consumers and others who have connections to animals in a public dialog over the proper role of animals in society, and to advance their shared values.

“As you can imagine, Mike has helped Farm Bureau manage through numerous challenges that are facing animal agriculture in the state and region,” said Dennis Bolling, president and CEO, UPI. “This unique perspective will no doubt help UPI as we continue to help our farmers navigate such challenges on their own farms in the communities we serve.… Continue reading

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Organic and Sustainable Agriculture Field Day

An Organic and Sustainable Agriculture Field Day is being held Thursday, Sept. 5, 2013 from 5:00 – 8:00 pm. A meal is being provided.

The event will be at the Agricultural Incubator Foundation, 13737 Middleton Pike, that is miles north of Bowling Green. Take St. Rt. 582 exit from Interstate 75, turn west about 2.5 miles. The field day is free and open to the public.  No reservations needed.

The agenda includes discussion of OSU Organic Food and Farming Education Research program, scientists will discuss results and seek comments for future research. The Organic Valley organic corn variety test plot being discussed includes 24 varieties. Zeolite soil amendment research, USDA long-term organic eco-system services grant results, no-till organic grain production, cover crops, pest scouting and organic controls.

Sponsored by O.A.R.D.C. (Ohio Agricultural Research & Development Center) and OSU Extension. Contact Alan Sundermeier at 419-354-9050 or Sundermeier.5@osu.edu for further information.… Continue reading

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2013 not been a bad year for bugs

Lower insect populations have led to minor crop damage this summer, but a Purdue Extension entomologist says farmers should still watch for anomalies when scouting.

Part of what has caused fewer insects has been the weather. Temperatures have been mild, and rainfall has been timely for most of the growing season. Most importantly, the crops had good conditions for growth during the critical period just after planting.

“We’ve had a good summer for growing conditions,” Christian Krupke said. “We’ve had rain, and plants just aren’t as vulnerable.”

Some insect pests that still have caused some damage to crops this summer are bean leaf beetles in soybeans and armyworms in corn.

Krupke has received reports of bean leaf beetle populations from all over the state, but the damage is more severe in northern counties. Some reports have described minor pod scarring, which isn’t of much concern. Other reports, however, have included pods clipped from stems.… Continue reading

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Will corn dry down in 2013?

Are we going to have wet corn this year? I am afraid so, unless you were able to plant early. We are facing the following scenarios this year for corn yields and maturity:

• Rains in April and May delayed corn planting in most of the Corn Belt.

• Weather has been cooler than normal and we are at least 12 to 15 days behind normal and about 20 days behind last year, if corn was planted by May 15. Corn planted in late May and early June has just finished pollinating.

• After pollination, It takes 45 to 50 days to reach maturity.

• When planted late, corn hybrids require fewer growing degree days to reach maturity than earlier planted corn if the temperatures are near normal in July and August.

• The yields are generally higher when it is cooler because the plants have a longer grain-fill period. The plants just live longer in cooler weather and yield more but that delays reaching physiological maturity or 32% kernel moisture (black layer).… Continue reading

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GMOanswers.com seeks to add transparency to public debate

The Council for Biotechnology Information, that includes biotech heavy hitters like BASF, Dupont, Monsanto, Bayer CropSciences, Dow AgroSciences, Monsanto and Syngenta, has decided that enough is enough when it comes to misinformation about biotechnology.

In the spirit of transparency, the group has launched GMOanswers.com.

According to the website, “GMO Answers was created to do a better job answering your questions — no matter what they are — about GMOs. The biotech industry stands 100 % behind the health and safety of the GM crops on the market today, but we acknowledge that we haven’t done the best job communicating about them — what they are, how they are made, what the safety data says.”

This website aspires to be the beginning of a new conversation among everyone who cares about how food is grown. Its goal is to make information about GMOs in food and agriculture easier to access and understand.… Continue reading

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PEDv may be quieting down

The National Pork Board is reporting that there are signs that indicate Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea virus (PEDv) is quieting down

An outbreak of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea first identified in the U.S. in mid-May has spread to 18 states. At first, roughly two thirds of the infections were reported on finishing floors and a third in sow farms. PEDv is the greatest challenge in sow farms where there has been up to 100% mortality in young pigs.

“Right now all we have is anecdotal information from the field and it sounds like the spread of the virus has decreased,” said Dr. Paul Sundberg, the vice president science and technology with the National Pork Board. “We don’t have good data on that. The data that we get from the diagnostic labs contains re-testing from positive farms and we can’t parse that out so we don’t have good data but the anecdotal information we get from the field is that it appears that the virus is quieting down somewhat.”… Continue reading

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Pasture management in the fall

The fall period, particularly the months of September and October, is an important time to manage pastures. Specifically, pastures must be managed to insure that the desirable grass and legume plants are able to build up and store carbohydrate reserves for the winter period. It is this ability to store carbohydrate reserves and thus keep a root system living over the winter months that distinguishes a perennial plant from an annual plant.

It is during the short day, long night periods in the fall of the year that flower buds are formed/initiated on the crown of the plant. While the leaf tissue dies during the winter, the buds and roots of the plant remain as living tissues over the winter and continue to respire and burn energy. If root reserves are insufficient the plant may die over the winter. If the plant survives but root reserves are low, spring re-growth and vigor of the plant is reduced.… Continue reading

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U.S. wins trade dispute with China over poultry

United States Trade Representative Michael Froman, Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker, and Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack recently announced that the United States won a major case at the World Trade Organization (WTO) on behalf of American chicken producers, proving that China’s imposition of higher duties on chicken “broiler products” — which was followed by an 80-percent drop in American exports of those products to China — is unjustified under international trade rules.

A WTO dispute settlement panel agreed with the United States, finding that China violated numerous WTO obligations in conducting its investigations and imposing anti-dumping (AD) duties and countervailing duties (CVD) on chicken imports from the United States.

“Agricultural exports continue to be a strong and growing component of U.S. exports. Farm exports in fiscal year 2012 reached $135.8 billion and supported 1 million jobs here at home. More than $23 billion worth of those agricultural products went to China alone.… Continue reading

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India’s poultry industry offers potential for corn exports

India’s poultry industry currently sells 95% of its product through wet markets, fresh food markets where animals are sold live and then processed either onsite or in the consumer’s home. These wet markets pose numerous sanitary risks and are inaccessible to long-distance consumers.

Moving to a processed poultry market would give India better control of food safety and quality, and would over time increase consumer confidence. It would also enhance the ability to transport processed poultry products to distant markets and ultimately expand poultry consumption — all of which would lead to a higher per capita poultry consumption.

“India’s poultry production is just as efficient as the United States, but they have yet to convince Indian consumers to purchase processed poultry meat,” said Adel Yusupov, U.S. Grains Council regional director in Southeast Asia. “Even though India’s government has yet to enforce food safety standards, the Council believes that though a series of seminars and discussion with other Southeast Asia poultry companies the Indian poultry industry will take it upon themselves to sell a good, safe product to the consumer.”… Continue reading

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Champaign County research facility making an IMPACT

After spending years searching the eastern U.S. for just the right location for a research center, Dupont Pioneer ended up putting down roots in Champaign County near Urbana. The Ohio location offered the soils, climate and conditions just right for testing hybrids and varieties that work in the soils of the eastern Corn Belt.

The 24,000 square foot research station is a boon to the local community, but it also was designed with the intent to make sure Pioneer customers get the right product on the right acre.

“Pioneer does research on a global basis but we also want our customers to know we are testing products locally for our Ohio customer’s environment and soil types,” said Bekah Peck, DuPont Pioneer Communications manager.

The facility serves two purposes when it comes to researching new Pioneer corn hybrids and soybean varieties. Initial research on new products is being conducted out of this facility on over 100 acres at seven different locations from Napoleon to Washington Court House. … Continue reading

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Ohio’s Crop Progress Report – August 26th, 2013

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There were six days suitable for fieldwork in Ohio during the week ending August 25, according to the USDA, NASS, Great Lakes Region. Scattered showers throughout the State provided much needed moisture to some areas; other areas missed the rainfall and moisture continued to evaporate. Some fields with lighter, sandy soils are beginning to show moisture stress. Crops are still in good condition, although corn and hay are maturing slower than usual. Soybeans are on schedule and look good. While producers were able to work in their fields due to the weather, the lack of rain in recent weeks has slowed the re-growth of hay for a third cutting. Other activities included cleaning grain bins, planting cover crops, and attending fairs, field days, and farm shows.

See the crops progress and conditionContinue reading

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Weekly Corn Belt Update {August 26th, 2013}

WEEKLY CORN BELT CROP REPORT

The Snapshot Tour is hosted by Jay Calhoun of Colgan Commodities. This is a daily update on crop and weather conditions across ten locations in the Corn Belt.  It starts during spring planting and ends when harvest is wrapped up.  Jay has been the host of this update for 21 years.   You can listen to the daily conference call in full by visiting www.colgancommodities.com and clicking on the audio tab.

Maumee, Ohio

NW Ohio is going to have a very large corn crop and could be challenged “where” to put it all.  That is not going to be true for the entire state, as there will be great variability.Continue reading

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Pesticide changes coming due to pollinator challenges

With a story about the continuing bee troubles gracing the cover of a summer issue of “Time Magazine” the growing buzz over pollinator problems is only set to increase.

In mid August, the U.S. EPA announced that new bee advisories will be appearing on pesticide product labels that contain imidacloprid, dinotefuran, clothianidin, and thiamethoxam. These active ingredients are all part of the neonicotinoid group of insecticides.

“Multiple factors play a role in bee colony declines, including pesticides. The Environmental Protection Agency is taking action to protect bees from pesticide exposure and these label changes will further our efforts,” said Jim Jones, assistant administrator for the Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention.

The new labels will have a bee advisory box and icon with information on routes of exposure and spray drift precautions. The EPA will work with pesticide manufacturers to change labels so that they will meet the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) safety standard.

… Continue reading

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New John Deere sprayers take big steps forward

To meet evolving application needs of customers and Final Tier 4 emissions requirements, John Deere introduced the R4030 and R4038 Self-Propelled Sprayers. These new, completely redesigned John Deere 4 Series Sprayers offer greater productivity, more uptime, and reduced cost of operation while delivering faster, easier and more precise product application.

The 800-gallon R4030 Sprayer replaces the 4730 model. It features a 280 horsepower 6.8L PowerTech Plus PSS Final Tier 4 engine with a four-wheel hydrostatic drive that can operate up to 20 MPH in the field and 30 MPH in transport.

The 1,000-gallon R4038 Sprayer replaces the 4830 Sprayer. It features a 310 horsepower 9.0L PowerTech Plus PSS Final Tier 4 engine with a four-wheel hydrostatic drive that can operate up to 25 MPH in the field and 35 MPH in transport.

Both sprayers have redesigned flat-fold booms in widths up to 120 feet, improved weight distribution, the CommandView II cab with the fully integrated GreenStar3 2630 display, and the latest in tire technologies.… Continue reading

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Becknology Days draws huge crowd

Becknology Days, with all of its agronomic information and amenities for customers, drew another huge crowd to Atlanta, Ind. At the event, Dale Minyo got to sit down and talk with Sonny Beck, president of Beck’s Hybrids, about the current and future agriculture of the region.

“We’ve had a pretty good year in Indiana and Ohio compared to the rest of the industry. We’ve had some good prices. I think everyone knew that we just couldn’t maintain $7 corn. Demand is increasing but you can’t hold that because too many uses will drop off at $7 or $8 corn. We need to make our budgets more conservative with that in mind,” he said.

The concern with resistant weeds continues to be top of mind.

“We’ve had a really good relationship here with Roundup Ready for a long time, and we knew that before you start to get resistance you’d better start changing.… Continue reading

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Realistic Renewable Fuel Standard attainable

Lessons in agriculture for Ohio’s science teachers

 

Thirty Ohio schoolteachers gathered from across the state in early August for a two-day agricultural workshop at the Greene County Career Center and Conover Research Farm near Xenia, Ohio.

The workshop, “Feeding the World: Science, Energy and Agriculture,” was created by the Ohio Corn Marketing Program (OCMP) and the Greene County Career Center to encourage middle and high school science teachers to include agricultural topics in their lesson plans.

Participants explored the Conover Research Farm’s demonstration plots, spoke with agricultural experts and learned lab skills to pass along to their students this new school year.

Six curriculums approved by the board of education were shared with the teachers. Subjects covered included global food security, biotechnology, soil and sustainability, water quality, biofuels and the value of corn production.

Industry experts from companies including The Andersons, Purina, Trupointe, LG Seeds and Cargill also met with the group to talk about the place of corn in the economy and how it affects businesses.… Continue reading

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Lessons in agriculture for Ohio’s science teachers

Thirty Ohio schoolteachers gathered from across the state in early August for a two-day agricultural workshop at the Greene County Career Center and Conover Research Farm near Xenia, Ohio.

The workshop, “Feeding the World: Science, Energy and Agriculture,” was created by the Ohio Corn Marketing Program (OCMP) and the Greene County Career Center to encourage middle and high school science teachers to include agricultural topics in their lesson plans.

Participants explored the Conover Research Farm’s demonstration plots, spoke with agricultural experts and learned lab skills to pass along to their students this new school year.

Six curriculums approved by the board of education were shared with the teachers. Subjects covered included global food security, biotechnology, soil and sustainability, water quality, biofuels and the value of corn production.

Industry experts from companies including The Andersons, Purina, Trupointe, LG Seeds and Cargill also met with the group to talk about the place of corn in the economy and how it affects businesses.… Continue reading

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Wallace racing with ethanol at Bristol

Bristol Motor Speedway will see a familiar face and a familiar brand tomorrow for the Food City 250, as American Ethanol joins forces once again with veteran driver Kenny Wallace. Wallace climbs back behind the wheel of the No. 29 RAB Racing American Ethanol Toyota Camry.

“I’m so excited to be going to Bristol Motor Speedway, the ultimate short track, for grassroots racing just like I grew up on. The night race at Bristol is absolutely electrifying, and I’m really excited to be a part of it and looking forward to showing off our new American Ethanol paint scheme,” Wallace said. “It’s been almost a full year since I’ve raced an American Ethanol Camry, and I’m so happy to be debuting a brand new paint scheme for them on a very special day for me, my 50th birthday.”

Wallace, a veteran of the .533-mile oval, has not only won at “Thunder Valley,” but has finished in the top 10 in half of his Nationwide Series starts (18 of 36).… Continue reading

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