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The Ohio Crop Progress Report – June 27th

 OHIO CROP WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS

WEEK ENDING SUNDAY JUNE 26, 2011

The average temperature for the State was 70.7 degrees, unchanged from normal for the week ending Sunday, June 26, 2011. Precipitation averaged 1.24 inches, 0.36 inches above normal. There were 146 modified growing degree days, 2 days above normal. Reporters rated 3.2 days suitable for fieldwork during the seven-day period ending Friday, June 24, 2011. Topsoil moisture was rated 0 percent very short, 6 percent short, 68 percent adequate, and 26 percent surplus.

FIELD ACTIVITIES AND CROP PROGRESS

Temperatures across the state were average for this time of year, and precipitation was only slightly above normal. Most field activities included cutting hay, spraying herbicide and side-dressing corn. As expected, late planted corn is showing better stand counts that of early planted acres. The quality of the wheat crop is yet to be determined, however heavy rains in late may during flowering and pollination may have prevented some heads from producing grain.… Continue reading

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New Purdue Extension guide teaches hitch system safety

Motorists can reduce hitch-related truck and trailer accidents by following key safety steps offered in a new Purdue Extension guide.

“Keep the Trailer Connected to the Truck: Understanding the Hitch System” describes appropriate hitch system selection and use in an effort to decrease the number of highway accidents caused by detached trailers.

“Trailer accidents caused by faulty hitches aren’t just something we are saying could happen,” said Fred Whitford, lead author of the publication and Purdue extension safety specialist. “This is something that does happen every day across the nation, causing serious injuries, death and environmental hazards.”

The publication, PPP-92, is available through Purdue Extension: The Education Store athttps://mdc.itap.purdue.edu/item.asp?itemID=19985 or by calling toll-free 1-888-398-4636. It is free if downloaded from the Web, or $5 in printed format. It’s also available at Purdue Extension county offices.

“Keep the Trailer Connected to the Truck” describes how to properly select and assemble a hitch mount for a trailer.… Continue reading

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ODA working to demonstrate that “Ohio Means Agribusiness”

By Matt Reese

If you ask the Governor, or the Director of Agriculture, in the state, they’ll tell you that “Ohio Means Agribusiness.” Since Governor John Kasich was elected the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA), along with the Ohio Department of Development (ODD), has made concerted effort to work with attracting and expanding agribusinesses to Ohio to boost Ohio’s struggling economy.

“If you take a look, the ODD and the ODA are following about $1.3 billion of proposed new ag facilities and expansions in Ohio, and those are just the larger facilities that the ODD has identified for possible assistance,” said Rocky Black, ODA deputy director. “There are a number of different projects we are working on.”

One example is Pioneer Hi-Bred that set up a temporary research station in Plain City and is now looking for a site for a permanent facility in western Ohio.

“We are working with Pioneer Hi-Bred on bringing a permanent seed research facility to Ohio,” Black said.… Continue reading

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Three-Day West Ohio Grazing School in Sidney: Register by July 8

A three-day, intensive-grazing educational program designed for livestock producers in both Ohio and Indiana is scheduled for July 14, 21 and 23 at the Shelby County office of Ohio State University Extension in Sidney, Ohio.



This year’s West Ohio Grazing School will include two evening sessions (6-8 p.m. on July 14 and 21) and one morning-afternoon session (10 a.m.-2:30 p.m.) on July 23. The last session will take place at a local intensively managed pasture site.

 Early registration (which costs $50 per person and includes lunch on July 23) is due by July 8. Late registration (July 9-12) costs $60.

To register, download the form at http://darke.osu.edu/graphics/July%202011%20Grazing%20School%20Flier.pdf, fax it to 937-547-6491, or mail it to OSU Extension Darke County, 603 Wagner Ave., Greenville, OH 45331.

The July 14 program includes sessions on “What is MiG (management-intensive grazing)?”, “How Soils Affect Grazing,” and “Environmental Considerations.”

July 21 topics include “Meeting Animal Nutritional Requirements,” “Mineral Supplementation,” “Forage Species Selection,” and “Pasture Weed Control.”

… Continue reading

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ASA pushes for resources to keep inland waterways functioning

The American Soybean Association (ASA) has joined with the National Grain and Feed Association, other producer groups, processors, and input suppliers, alerting the Congressional Appropriations Committees about the urgent need for additional resources to dredge and repair inland waterways that have been damaged by historic high water levels.

“Agricultural producers, processors and exporters rely on the entire Mississippi River system and share concern about the impact recent floods in the Midwest will have on the river system,” said ASA First Vice President Steve Wellman, a soybean producer from Syracuse, Neb. “More than 60% of U.S. soybean exports moved to world markets through the Port of South Louisiana via the Mississippi River and its tributaries.”

A modern and efficient inland waterways transportation system is vital to maintaining U.S. agricultural competitiveness in the world market. As the U.S. system continues to face delays and closures attributable to low drafts and crumbling locks and dams, competitors are increasing expenditures on their own transport infrastructures, thereby eroding the competitive advantage long enjoyed by the United States.… Continue reading

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2011 Beef Quality Audit underway, producer input needed

Cattle producers are being asked to provide their input to the 2011 National Beef Quality Audit by taking a short survey at www.cattlesurvey.com. The survey can be completed in approximately 10 minutes.

The 2011 NBQA, led by scientists from Colorado State University and Texas A&M University, is designed to collect and analyze information from cooler audits in the packing sector, face-to-face interviews with beef supply chain partners and for the first time cattle producers including feeders, stockers, cow-calf operators, and seedstock producers will be surveyed. According to Field, producer input is being sought to strengthen the measurement of quality-based practices implemented on farms and ranches that support consumer confidence in beef products and production systems.

The checkoff-funded National Beef Quality Audit (NBQA) has provided important benchmarks for the U.S. beef industry since 1991. According to Tom Field, Executive Director of Producer Education, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, contractor to the Beef Checkoff Program, the audit has been conducted approximately every four years with the historic focus centered on quantifying the performance of beef carcasses for a number of value enhancing characteristics.… Continue reading

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Ohio hog inventory down from last year

Ohio hog producers had 2.03 million hogs on hand June 1, 2011, down 3% from a year ago but up 2% from last quarter. The number of market hogs, at 1,865,000 head, was up 2% from last quarter but down 4% from last year. Breeding stock, at 165,000 head, was down 3% from last quarter but unchanged from last year.

The pig crop during the March-May 2011 quarter numbered 851,000 head, up 1% from last year and up 2% from last quarter. The number of sows farrowed during the March-May 2011 quarter, at 90,000, was up 1% from last quarter and from last year. Pigs saved per litter averaged 9.45, down slightly from last year but up slightly from last quarter.

Ohio producers intend to farrow 87,000 sows during the June-August 2011 quarter; down 4% from a year earlier. Farrowing intentions for the fall quarter, September-November 2011, is 87,000 sows, down 3% from the same quarter of 2010.… Continue reading

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AEM calls on Congress and the Administration to stop plans for disruption of GPS signals


The Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM) has expressed concerns about a company’s efforts to move forward with plans to create a faster 4G wireless network by switching airwaves after tests showed its previous system interfered with GPS systems. Here is a statement from Dennis Slater,
AEM president, about the issue:

AEM is a founding member of the Coalition to Save Our GPS, as well as a member of the Transportation Construction Coalition (TCC). AEM calls on Congress, Transportation Secretary LaHood, and the Federal Communications Commission to stop the threat in the U.S. to Global Positioning Systems (GPS) posed by LightSquared, the company planning to deploy a nationwide broadband internet infrastructure of 40,000 ground stations.

Not only would the 40,000 ground stations very likely render commercial and private GPS signals unreliable and in some cases useless, but implementing LightSquared’s plan would add unnecessary burdens to the U.S. economy.

A study just released by the Coalition to Save Our GPS reveals that the stakes in this issue are very high and very real for our struggling economy.… Continue reading

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WISHH provides soy to Afghans in need

In May, 414 bags of Stine soybean seeds arrived at Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan for the U.S. Department of Agriculture-funded Soybeans in Agricultural Renewal of Afghanistan (SarAi) project, launched by the American Soybean Association’s (ASA) World Initiative for Soy in Human Health (WISHH) program in 2010. The seeds were loaded onto a truck and transported to the project site at Dashta-Qala, Takhar Province. On June 13, the farmers received the seeds, inoculum and fertilizer for planting their first cash crop.

The multi-faceted SarAi project uses soybeans to benefit Afghan farmers, food processors, and rural communities, as well as women and children. It provides a total of 240 metric tons of defatted soy flour, 13,750 metric tons of soybean oil and 6,000 metric tons of soybeans over three years. Over the life of the program and all of its activities, this project will benefit more than 405,000 Afghan people.… Continue reading

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Root zone wars can cause corn casualties

By Dervin Druist, Syngenta agronomist

Corn is developing quickly this time of year, and agronomists often get questions about nutrient deficiencies, herbicide concerns, and other plant growth related topics. On my recent service calls, I was reminded again of the importance of the root zone. Planting into optimum conditions was difficult this spring, and now the roots are battling the seed zone issues that we created mechanically, or by hydraulic compaction due to the very heavy rainfall we had at times.

Hydraulic surface compaction

As I sank my spade in fields across several states, it was obvious there was significant surface compaction in some areas this year. Many times, the top two inches of soil would come up like chunks of brick. What would you expect the corn plant to look like under those conditions? In one situation, a grower no-till planted at one-inch seed depth this year because he thought he needed quick emergence with the cold, rainy conditions.… Continue reading

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USDA-funded research aims to reduce food-borne illnesses

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) has awarded research, education and extension grants to 24 institutions, including Ohio State University, to reduce food-borne illnesses and deaths from microbial contamination.

“While the U.S. food supply is generally considered to be one of the safest in the world, approximately 48 million Americans become sick each year due to food-borne illnesses,” said Catherine Woteki, USDA Chief Scientist and Under Secretary for Research, Education and Economics. “These grants support the development of a more complete understanding of the sources and implications of microbial contamination and will promote the adoption of new food safety strategies and technologies. The goal is to greatly improve the safety of our food supply and ultimately save lives.”

Ohio State University got $500,000 for conducting research to advance our understanding of the interactions between viruses and leafy greens with hopes of improving measures to reduce or eliminate virus-related outbreaks of foodborne illness and enhance public health.… Continue reading

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Just because we’ve always done it that way, doesn’t make it right

By John F. Grimes, OSU Extension Beef Coordinator

One of the great strengths and at the same time, great weaknesses of the beef industry in this country is the wide diversity of genetics that we have at our disposal to utilize in a wide range of environments. We obviously have a wide range of climatic conditions where beef is produced ranging from the cold winters of upper Midwest, the arid conditions of the western states, the plentiful moisture and resulting mud in the eastern Corn Belt, to the heat of the southern states. When you compare these varying conditions to the controlled environments that species such as poultry, swine, and in many cases dairy utilize, you can understand why we see much more variability in the look of cow herds across the country. It certainly makes the job tougher for the beef industry to produce a consistent product for the consumer.… Continue reading

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Just because we've always done it that way, doesn't make it right

By John F. Grimes, OSU Extension Beef Coordinator

One of the great strengths and at the same time, great weaknesses of the beef industry in this country is the wide diversity of genetics that we have at our disposal to utilize in a wide range of environments. We obviously have a wide range of climatic conditions where beef is produced ranging from the cold winters of upper Midwest, the arid conditions of the western states, the plentiful moisture and resulting mud in the eastern Corn Belt, to the heat of the southern states. When you compare these varying conditions to the controlled environments that species such as poultry, swine, and in many cases dairy utilize, you can understand why we see much more variability in the look of cow herds across the country. It certainly makes the job tougher for the beef industry to produce a consistent product for the consumer.… Continue reading

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H. R. 872 moves closer to a Senate vote

Congressional leaders from both parties have expressed interest in reining in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s expanding regulations. In one such effort, Ohio Representatives Bob Gibbs and Jean Schmidt took the lead on H. R. 872 that addressed the EPA’s duplication of regulations with National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits.

H.R. 872, the Reducing Regulatory Burdens Act of 2011, passed the House earlier this year and was just passed by the Senate Agriculture Committee with a strong bipartisan vote. This legislation clarifies that NPDES permits are not required when applying pesticides according to their EPA approved label. Ohio Farm Bureau, American Farm Bureau, and the nation’s crop organizations were pleased with the bill’s progress one step closer to a vote on the Senate floor. U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH), voted in favor of the measure.

From a statement from the Ohio Corn and Wheat Growers Association: “OCWGA is pleased by Sen.… Continue reading

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Executive order helps prevent spread of Asian longhorned beetle

Gov. John R. Kasich signed an Executive Order restricting the movement of hardwood logs, firewood, stumps, roots and branches out of Tate Township in Clermont County to help prevent the spread of the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB).

The executive order is effective immediately and also restricts the sale of nursery stock, green lumber, and logs of the following trees: maples, horse chestnut, buckeye, mimosa, birch, hackberry, ash, golden raintree, katsura, sycamore, poplar, willow, mountain ash, and elms.

Working with the Ohio Department of Agriculture, the US Department of Agriculture APHIS confirmed on Friday, June 17 the presence of ALB in Tate Township in Clermont County, which is located about 30 miles southeast of Cincinnati.

Executive Order 2011-11K can be viewed here: http://governor.ohio.gov/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=t_kiJ0piYM0%3d&tabid=69Continue reading

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Cooling system may build eggs’ natural defenses against salmonella

Once eggs are laid, their natural resistance to pathogens begins to wear down, but a Purdue University scientist believes he knows how to rearm those defenses.

Kevin Keener, an associate professor of food science, created a process for rapidly cooling eggs that is designed to inhibit the growth of bacteria such as salmonella. The same cooling process would saturate the inside of an egg with carbon dioxide and alter pH levels, which he has found are connected to the activity of an enzyme called lysozyme, which defends egg whites from bacteria.

“This enzyme activity is directly related to the carbon dioxide and pH levels,” said Keener, whose results were published in the journal Poultry Science. “An increase in lysozyme would lead to increased safety in eggs.”

Freshly laid eggs are saturated with carbon dioxide and have pH levels of about 7. Over time, the pH level rises to 9 and carbon dioxide escapes, Keener said.… Continue reading

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Cooling system may build eggs' natural defenses against salmonella

Once eggs are laid, their natural resistance to pathogens begins to wear down, but a Purdue University scientist believes he knows how to rearm those defenses.

Kevin Keener, an associate professor of food science, created a process for rapidly cooling eggs that is designed to inhibit the growth of bacteria such as salmonella. The same cooling process would saturate the inside of an egg with carbon dioxide and alter pH levels, which he has found are connected to the activity of an enzyme called lysozyme, which defends egg whites from bacteria.

“This enzyme activity is directly related to the carbon dioxide and pH levels,” said Keener, whose results were published in the journal Poultry Science. “An increase in lysozyme would lead to increased safety in eggs.”

Freshly laid eggs are saturated with carbon dioxide and have pH levels of about 7. Over time, the pH level rises to 9 and carbon dioxide escapes, Keener said.… Continue reading

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Proper hay storage vital to protecting feed quality

After a wet spring and delayed hay harvest, a Purdue Extension beef specialist says it is vitally important for beef producers to store hay properly to reduce nutrient loss.

Much of the hay harvested now will be used as a main feed source this coming winter, said Ron Lemenager. Improper storage can lead to losses in weight or dry matter, as well as the nutrients required by animals, such as soluble energy, protein, vitamins and minerals.

“In an ideal world, producers would store hay bales inside,” he said. “But, with most producers using large, round bales, that’s often not possible.”

For outdoor storage, Lemenager said protecting hay quality starts with baling. The moisture level of the crop should be 15% to 18%. Anything above 22% poses a spontaneous combustion risk from bacterial growth. The same is true for bales with internal temperatures approaching 170 degrees, so producers making wet hay need to monitor bale temperatures, especially when hay is stored inside.… Continue reading

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Weekly Crop Progress Report-June 20th

OHIO CROP WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS WEEK ENDING SUNDAY JUNE 19, 2011

The average temperature for the State was 66.7 degrees, 3.6 degrees below normal. Precipitation averaged 0.73 inches, 0.23 inches below normal. There were 107 modified growing degree days, 34 days below normal. Reporters rated 5.4 days suitable for fieldwork during the seven-day period ending Friday, June 17, 2011. Topsoil moisture was rated 0 percent very short, 13 percent short, 76 percent adequate, and 11 percent surplus.

FIELD ACTIVITIES AND CROP PROGRESS

Temperatures and precipitation were lower than normal for most of the state, a departure from the previous two weeks. A break from the rainfall allowed farmers to finish planting corn and soybeans. Most field activities included cutting hay, spraying herbicide and side-dressing corn. Some wheat fields were showing indications of fusarium head blight due to high moisture levels. There were isolated reports of cut worm in corn, as well.

As of Sunday June 19th, corn was 92 percent emerged.… Continue reading

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