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More Wheat Varieties Resistant to Head Scab Now Available

As wheat growers prepare to plant their crop this fall, they are encouraged to choose varieties that are resistant to head scab.

Pierce Paul, an Ohio State University Extension plant pathologist, said that more varieties are available with good head scab resistance and high yield potential.

“In the past, there were very few Ohio-grown winter wheat varieties with decent scab resistance, and some of those varieties yielded poorly or did not grow well under our conditions,” said Paul, who also holds an appointment with the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. “Today, we have far more varieties with very good scab resistance in combination with very good yield potential.”

Based on results of the 2010 Ohio Wheat Performance Trials, more than 20 percent of the varieties evaluated were considered resistant and more that 38 percent moderately resistant, for a total of 58 percent of the varieties rated at least moderately resistant.… Continue reading

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Ohio Department of Agriculture Announces Farm Pesticide Disposal Collection

The Ohio Department of Agriculture is sponsoring a collection for farmers to dispose of pesticides on Aug. 5 from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the Hardin County Fairgrounds, 14134 Fairground Road, County Road 40, Kenton, Ohio.

The pesticide collection and disposal service is free of charge, but only farm chemicals will be accepted. Paint, antifreeze, solvents, and household and non-farm pesticides will not be accepted.

Pesticide collections are sponsored by the department in conjunction with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. To pre-register, or for more information, contact the Ohio Department of Agriculture at 614-728-6987.… Continue reading

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Wet weather causes problems with hay harvest

Rainfall and high humidity this summer have made it hard for farmers to harvest hay, said a Purdue Extension forage specialist.

“Some farmers got their hay mowed, but then they lost yield and quality when it rained,” Keith Johnson said. “Others did not get it cut in timely fashion, so the quality of their hay went down.”

The heat and humidity have caused more problems than normal, Johnson said. Because high moisture can cause mold in the hay and other bacteria and fungi can form and cause combustion, it is important to monitor hay after harvest and to store it properly.

Part of proper storage means farmers need to monitor the crop’s moisture content. Small rectangular bales should have a moisture content of less than 20 percent, while large rectangular bales and large round bales should be closer to 18 percent moisture content when baled.

Hay can be packaged at slightly higher moisture levels if farmers have the proper equipment to apply propionic acid, a preservative, at baling.… Continue reading

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Ohio agriculture remains divided after the HSUS agreement

By Matt Reese

After the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) announced their plan to put an issue on the November ballot to implement restrictive measures on animal agriculture, Ohio agriculture united to thwart the efforts. The efforts from both sides of this contentious issue, however, ended in late June when HSUS announced that they would not pursue a ballot measure after an agreement was struck with Ohio agricultural leaders and Governor Ted Strickland.

This agreement is a list of recommendations that the Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board (put into place last fall with the passage of Issue 2) will consider as they formulate the animal care rules for the state. HSUS, in turn, agreed to acknowledge the Ohio Livestock Care Standards Boards as the authority on animal care in Ohio. Both sides say they can live with the agreement, but it still does not necessarily sit well with some in the livestock industry who were ready to fight HSUS.… Continue reading

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Strickland, State Directors Announce Action Plan for Grand Lake St. Marys

Ohio Governor Ted Strickland, joined by several state agency directors, announced both short- and long-term action plans to help restore Grand Lake St. Marys, Ohio’s largest inland lake.

The governor announced the State’s latest efforts to assist the area from the Wright State University Lake Campus, and he and the directors emphasized the action plan can only be implemented thanks to the good partnerships the State has developed with the local community and the federal government.

“We know that our businesses and families have struggled with the loss of activity at the lake this summer. This crisis has been generations in the making, and it will take all of us working together to try to restore this lake to health and prosperity,” Strickland said. “This action plan provides a clear direction forward, and I want to thank this community for working with us as we all search for ways to bring this lake back to health.”… Continue reading

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Apply Lessons Learned in 2010 to Next Season’s Wheat Crop

If the 2010 growing season was any indication, disease management needs to be one of the top things on growers’ lists if they are going to have a great wheat crop, says an Ohio State University Extension plant pathologist.

“We had everything this year – head scab and vomitoxin, Stagonospora leaf and glume blotch, powdery mildew, leaf rust, head smut, and cereal leaf beetle, plus a very hot late spring/early summer,” said Pierce Paul, a small grains specialist with the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. “The more aggressive growers were with disease management, the better the wheat. Some folks were just lucky, but in general, those who had resistant varieties planted and applied a fungicide at the right time, saw better yields and test weights, and had lower levels of vomitoxin.”

The biggest problem this year for growers was head scab and vomitoxin contamination of grain, with incidence ranging anywhere from three percent to 60 percent head scab, and vomitoxin from less than 1 parts per million to 18 parts per million.… Continue reading

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Apply Lessons Learned in 2010 to Next Season's Wheat Crop

If the 2010 growing season was any indication, disease management needs to be one of the top things on growers’ lists if they are going to have a great wheat crop, says an Ohio State University Extension plant pathologist.

“We had everything this year – head scab and vomitoxin, Stagonospora leaf and glume blotch, powdery mildew, leaf rust, head smut, and cereal leaf beetle, plus a very hot late spring/early summer,” said Pierce Paul, a small grains specialist with the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. “The more aggressive growers were with disease management, the better the wheat. Some folks were just lucky, but in general, those who had resistant varieties planted and applied a fungicide at the right time, saw better yields and test weights, and had lower levels of vomitoxin.”

The biggest problem this year for growers was head scab and vomitoxin contamination of grain, with incidence ranging anywhere from three percent to 60 percent head scab, and vomitoxin from less than 1 parts per million to 18 parts per million.… Continue reading

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Wheat researchers, millers urge growers to use all of the available science, information during planting to avoid another bad wheat harvest




The 2010 wheat harvest in Ohio has been one of the worst on record in Ohio since 1996 with many elevators reporting high toxin levels of grain. Fusarium Head Blight (FHB, also called scab) is a serious disease of wheat that affects the entire wheat industry in Ohio, from growers to millers to bakers.

“While there is no silver bullet to preventing head scab, there are tools available to avoid such a disastrous wheat harvest,” said Dr. Clay Sneller of The Ohio State University’s OARDC program in Wooster. “And it’s hard to eliminate any fungal disease with just crop rotation.”

The USDA’s US Wheat and Barley Scab Initiative has invested millions of dollars to develop technology to control FHB.  That technology is available right now and consists of varieties with improved resistance, effective fungicides, prediction models, and other management practices that reduce FHB (see http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/scabsmart/).

“Control of FHB primarily consists of planting the most resistant varieties and applying fungicides if heavy disease pressure is predicted.… Continue reading

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Soybean Checkoff steps up soy biodiesel promotion with new professional tractor pulling class

In an effort to continue to improve the availability and use of soy biodiesel, the United Soybean Board (USB) and soybean checkoff will sponsor a professional tractor pulling division in the National Tractor Pullers Association’s (NTPA’s) 2010 season. The new Light Pro Stock Class will be made up of tractors powered by biodiesel.

USB and the soybean checkoff will use the 2010 NTPA season as a way of showcasing the diesel engine performance benefits of soy biodiesel — a homegrown, environmentally friendly and renewable biofuel — to thousands of diesel users. Soybean oil serves as the dominant feedstock used to produce biodiesel in the United States. The soybean checkoff has partnered with NTPA since 2007 to encourage biodiesel use among tractor pulling fans, many of whom work in the agricultural and trucking sectors.

Soy biodiesel is comparable to petroleum diesel in conventional diesel engines but provides higher cetane levels, better lubricity and BTU content.… Continue reading

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USDA announces extension to GIPSA comment period

In late July, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) responded to calls to extend the comment period for the Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration’s (GIPSA) proposed rule on livestock marketing.

Concerns expressed by Congress, the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) National Pork Producers Council (NPPC) and other leading agriculture organizations led to the 90-day extension of the comment period for the proposed rule that suggests major changes to the way producers can market their livestock.

During a House Agriculture subcommittee hearing on livestock on July 20, 2010, both Democrats and Republicans expressed to USDA that the scope of GIPSA goes well beyond what Congress intended under the 2008 Farm Bill. Industry groups echoed the concern.

“Members of Congress from both sides of the aisle were very clear about the critical need to extend the comment period to allow stakeholders to thoroughly analyze the potential impacts of the rule,” said Colin Woodall, NCBA vice president of government affairs.… Continue reading

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Syngenta Seeds, Inc. Launches Agrisure Artesian Technology, First Water-Optimized Technology for Corn Hybrids

Syngenta Seeds, Inc., today unveiled its Agrisure Artesian technology, the new brand name for its range of water optimized hybrids and the newest addition to the Agrisure family of high-performance trait products. A limited quantity of hybrids with this technology, which has demonstrated the potential to deliver 15% yield preservation under drought stress, will be available through the company’s Garst, Golden Harvest and NK product brands.

Agrisure Artesian technology enables corn plants to use available moisture more efficiently, resulting in higher yields on drought-stressed acres including dryland and limited-irrigation farms in the western Corn Belt. Growers on rainfed acres in the central and eastern Corn Belt likewise can use Agrisure Artesian technology to help stabilize yields in years of inconsistent rainfall or in fields with variable soil types and moisture-holding capacity. In years of ideal rainfall, hybrids with Agrisure Artesian technology have demonstrated no yield penalty compared with hybrids without the technology.… Continue reading

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USB review reveals financial responsibility

The USDA recently conducted an 18-month review of the United Soybean Board (USB) and the soybean checkoff. The USDA’s Office of Inspector General (OIG) concluded that there was no basis for any of the allegations of wrong doing. The independent USDA report confirms that the United Soybean Board farmer directors are performing their duties in a financially responsible manner in accordance with the federal law that created the soybean checkoff.

“USB directors and staff are encouraged by the OIG’s report,” said Philip Bradshaw, USB chairman and soybean farmer from Griggsville, Ill. “The report confirms that, as farmer-directors, we’re doing our jobs as financially responsibly as the federal law that created the soybean checkoff set out for us to do.  USB will continue to move forward in achieving profit opportunities for every U.S. soybean farmer.”

A survey of U.S. soybean farmers conducted in February showed that 75 percent of U.S. soybean farmers support the soybean checkoff.  … Continue reading

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Weekly crop report

In Ohio, 92% of the corn was silking as of July 25, up from 75% a week earlier and well ahead of the 70% five-year average, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. Fifteen percent of Ohio’s corn crop had reached the dough stage compared to the 4% average. Ohio corn was 61% in good or excellent condition, compared to 72% nationally.

Nearly 80% of Ohio soybeans were in bloom and 36% were setting pods, both slightly ahead of the five-year average. Sixty percent of Ohio soybeans were in good or excellent condition.… Continue reading

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Opening Day at the Ohio State Fair

The 157th Ohio State Fair will celebrate Opening Day on Wednesday, July 28, 2010 with great savings. Experience all the traditional Fair favorites along with plenty of new attractions and exhibits.

“We are always excited to see friends and families come out to the Fair for opening day,” said Virgil Strickler, general manager. Annually the Fair begins with an Opening Day Ceremony to kick off the start of another Ohio State Fair.

The 2010 Opening Day Ceremony will take place at 9 am in front of the Cardinal Gate. Gov. Ted Strickland will participate in a ribbon-cutting ceremony to commemorate the official opening of the 157th Ohio State Fair. The All-Ohio State Fair Band & Youth Choir will also perform.

A ceremony will be held at 11:30 am on Opening Day at which the Coliseum will be dedicated to former Ohio Gov. Bob Taft.

Value is a key component of this year’s Fair and fairgoers can enjoy admission for only $3 until 3 pm on WBNS 10 TV & ONN Opening Day and Ohio Lottery Day.… Continue reading

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Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board special meeting notice

The Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board will meet on Tuesday, July 27, 2010, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Ohio Department of Agriculture’s Bromfield Administration Building, Auditorium A, 8995 E. Main St., Reynoldsburg, Ohio. The purpose of the meeting is to discuss non-ambulatory animals and draft care standards for euthanasia, as well as the agreement made between the Humane Society of the United States and Ohioans for Livestock Care and other recommendations. A public comment period will take place from 11:30 a.m. to noon.Continue reading

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U.S. Cattle on Feed Up 3 Percent

Cattle and calves on feed for slaughter market in the United States for
feedlots with capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 10.1 million head on
July 1, 2010. The inventory was 3 percent above July 1, 2009. The inventory
included 6.25 million steers and steer calves, up 4 percent from the previous
year. This group accounted for 62 percent of the total inventory. Heifers and
heifer calves accounted for 3.77 million head, up 1 percent from 2009.

Placements in feedlots during June totaled 1.63 million, 17 percent above
2009. Net placements were 1.57 million head. During June, placements of
cattle and calves weighing less than 600 pounds were 440,000, 600-699 pounds
were 300,000, 700-799 pounds were 408,000, and 800 pounds and greater were
480,000.

Marketings of fed cattle during June totaled 2.00 million, slightly above
2009.

Other disappearance totaled 55,000 during June, 4 percent below 2009.

U.S. All Cattle on Feed Up 3 Percent

Cattle on feed July 1, 2010, from all feedlots in the United States, totaled
12.0 million, up 3 percent from the 11.6 million on July 1, 2009.… Continue reading

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Bee-ware of scams and vandals

By Barbara Bloetscher, State Apiarist, Ohio Department of Agriculture

Several incidents of vandalism and scams have been reported the last two months.  A group (most likely PETA) poured kerosene in some live hives and left a sign stating that they had “freed the bees of human domination.”  Of course beekeepers know that the group just murdered the bees in very heinous way and that beekeepers are doing their best to keep bees ALIVE.  Please keep an eye on your hives and do not let anyone handle the hives except for the County Apiary Inspector and friends whom you have authorized.

Another person or persons have reportedly written a list of violations against a beekeeper and left the “ticket” containing violations and fines for the beekeeper to pay.  NO ONE including the State Apiarist has the authority to write violations without first contacting the beekeeper and undergoing major paper work and legal transactions which takes months to undergo. … Continue reading

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Ohio State Fair Junior Fair Board announced

A team of exceptional individuals has been announced to represent Ohio’s renowned Junior Fair program at the 157th Ohio State Fair. Ohio State Fair Junior Fair Board (JFB) members are nominated by their respective youth organizations to serve a two year term as an ambassador for the Fair assisting with daily activities. At the conclusion of the Fair, officers are elected from those who will be serving a second term to lead the board’s activities in the following year. Responsibilities of the JFB include assisting with the daily parade, delivering awards, the Monster Mural, assisting in the WCOL Celeste Center and providing support to Junior Fair programs and other events as needed. The JFB is made up of some of the most active Junior Fair members in the State. Below you can find out what keeps them busy when they’re not at the Fair. Cambell Parrish of Edon, Ohio, represents the Ohio FFA Association as this year’s JFB president.… Continue reading

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Ohio Volunteer Farmer-Leader Appointed to the United Soybean Board

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack appointed 9 new farmer-leaders to the United Soybean Board (USB) in February, including John Motter of Jenera, Ohio. Motter grows soybeans, wheat and corn.

“The United Soybean Board has a history of developing many new products that increase the profitability of soybeans,” said Motter. “I want to do my part in helping U.S. soybean farmers increase their profitability.”

Motter is a member of the New Uses Committee and hopes to increase the demand for soybeans through upcoming new products.

“There are a number of projects in the new use pipeline,” said Motter. “Unfortunately, due to our relationship with industry partners, we have to maintain confidentiality in these projects. But trust that there is a long history of success in new uses. An example would be the partnership with Ford Motor Company and the Lear Corporation in developing soy-based foam for seats in Ford vehicles.”

Motter and the 12 other appointees from across the United States will serve three-year terms and will represent the interest of all U.S.… Continue reading

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