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What’s New at This Year’s Farm Science Review

Throughout its 48-year history, Ohio State University’s Farm Science Review has been at the forefront of showcasing the future of agriculture.

From the first no-till demonstrations to the introduction of big farm equipment to breakthrough research on crop diseases, Farm Science Review has always been the place for visitors to see the “newest” in agriculture, as well as conservation, home improvement, health, safety, money management, gardening and education.

“Farm Science Review embraces change. It’s just amazing to look at how far we’ve come and where we’ll be going,” said Farm Science Review manager Chuck Gamble. “We are constantly looking at new technologies, and new products and services, and their representation at the show is an asset to our visitors.”

Farm Science Review, Ohio’s premiere agricultural event, will take place Sept. 21-23 at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center in London, Ohio. Sponsored by the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, the event attracts upwards of 140,000 visitors from all over the country and Canada.… Continue reading

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What's New at This Year's Farm Science Review

Throughout its 48-year history, Ohio State University’s Farm Science Review has been at the forefront of showcasing the future of agriculture.

From the first no-till demonstrations to the introduction of big farm equipment to breakthrough research on crop diseases, Farm Science Review has always been the place for visitors to see the “newest” in agriculture, as well as conservation, home improvement, health, safety, money management, gardening and education.

“Farm Science Review embraces change. It’s just amazing to look at how far we’ve come and where we’ll be going,” said Farm Science Review manager Chuck Gamble. “We are constantly looking at new technologies, and new products and services, and their representation at the show is an asset to our visitors.”

Farm Science Review, Ohio’s premiere agricultural event, will take place Sept. 21-23 at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center in London, Ohio. Sponsored by the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, the event attracts upwards of 140,000 visitors from all over the country and Canada.… Continue reading

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Leaf diseases already in corn

By John Brien, CCA, AgriGold agronomist
A corn grower does not have to look very far to find the beginnings of leaf diseases in a corn field. The disease is beginning to appear on the lower leaves of the corn plants and will slowly move up onto the top of the canopy. Corn leaf diseases are not new and are always present at some level. The reason for concern this year is the timing and severity. Normally corn leaf diseases do not begin appearing until at least two weeks after pollination. In 2010, the leaf diseases are showing up one to two weeks BEFORE pollination. The early timing provides the diseases more opportunity to spread and cause economic damage.
Corn leaf diseases alone cause little economic damage, although their indirect problems can lead to serious issues. Generally, leaf diseases will go without notice. Few growers scout fields solely to determine the leaf disease pressure and therefore are unaware of the problems the diseases are causing.… Continue reading

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Ohio Department of Agriculture Finds Bovine Tuberculosis in Paulding County Herd

Ohio Department of Agriculture Director Robert Boggs today announces that preliminary tests performed by the department’s Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory revealed a positive result for bovine tuberculosis in a Paulding County dairy herd. There is no known human illness associated with this occurrence.

The herd was found positive after routine tuberculosis testing by the department. The herd was depopulated, and the department is currently conducting a trace-in and trace-out investigation to determine if other livestock may be affected.

“We are currently working with our state and federal partners on this matter to take the necessary steps to identify the origin of the affected cattle,” said Boggs. “This is yet another example of how the Ohio Department of Agriculture works daily to assure the safety of Ohio consumers and livestock.”

Tuberculosis is a disease caused by bacteria which affects the respiratory system. Bovine tuberculosis, also known as Cattle TB, is an infectious form of tuberculosis as it infects most warm-blooded animals, including humans.… Continue reading

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Research shows yield advantage of fungicide 



A recently released research summary shows that Headline fungicide effectively controls a broad spectrum of corn and soybean diseases, provides Plant Health benefits and maximizes crop yields. The Headline Fungicide Yield Research Summary demonstrates that the BASF fungicide provides corn growers approximately a 3 bu/A yield advantage over other available fungicides. 




“Growers are constantly weighing the practices and inputs they use for successfully growing a crop and maintaining their business,” said Nick Fassler, BASF Technical Market Manager. “BASF conducts this exhaustive research so growers can be assured that selecting Headline will help them meet their operational goals.”




The results of the report are based on a summary of university small plot trials, seed company hybrid evaluations and large scale, on-farm side-by-side comparisons of Headline from 2004 to 2009. Headline was applied with a 6 oz/A use rate in all tests. Compared to untreated checks, research shows a 13.5 bu/A average yield increase and 12.2, 16.9 and 19.4 bu/A yield improvements under conditions of low, moderate and high disease pressure, respectively, in corn.… Continue reading

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Ohio EPA Awards Nearly $200,000 for Sustainability Efforts on OSU Farm/Research Facility

 A working farm just west of The Ohio State University campus and nestled in the heart of metro Columbus is being transformed into a learning laboratory of best management practices for water quality protection and whole farm sustainability.

A $194,324 grant from Ohio Environmental Protection Agency and local matching dollars totaling $132,456 will enable the Franklin Soil and Water Conservation District to demonstrate several progressive projects on OSU’s Waterman Agriculture and Natural Resources Laboratory (2433 Carmack Rd.). The projects will serve as application tools for current and future farmers and showcase environmental stewardship for students, faculty and urban residents.

“The educational project will provide on-the-ground examples of how to improve operations and the sustainability of production, reduce maintenance costs and protect water resources both on the farm and downstream,” said Russ Gibson, Ohio EPA’s Division of Surface Water Nonpoint Source Section manager. The Franklin Soil and Water grant is one of eight federal Section 319 Clean Water Act grants awarded by Ohio EPA this year.… Continue reading

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New Crop Progress Statistics Released July 6

Released July 6, 2010, by the National Agricultural Statistics Service
(NASS), Agricultural Statistics Board, United States Department of
Agriculture (USDA).

Cotton Squaring – Selected States
[These 15 States planted 99% of the 2009 cotton acreage] —————————————————————–
                 :            Week ending            :          
                 :———————————–:          
      State      :  July 4,  : June 27,  :  July 4,  : 2005-2009
                 :   2009    :   2010    :   2010    :  Average 
—————————————————————–
                 :                    percent                   
                 :                                              
Alabama ………:    62          46          56          57    
Arizona ………:    57          46          55          72    
Arkansas ……..:    67          93          97          89    
California ……:    56          37          60          61    
Georgia ………:    54          54          70          62    
Kansas ……….:    26          13          38          30    
Louisiana …….:    92          80          91          90    
Mississippi …..:    74          70          93          83    
Missouri ……..:    49          59          66          67    
North Carolina ..:    75          69          85          74    
Oklahoma ……..:    33          25          35          32    
South Carolina ..:    46          35          55          47    
Tennessee …….:    65          52          77          78    
Texas ………..:    52          39          56          44    
Virginia ……..:   … Continue reading

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Guide Helps Growers Manage Soybean Cyst Nematode

Soybean cyst nematode (SCN), a destructive pest of soybeans, can be found in nearly every county in Ohio. A farmer may have it and not know it, and for those who know their fields are infested, proper management is crucial. In either situation, producers can look to the Soybean Cyst Nematode Management Guide for assistance.

The 5th edition publication, produced by the North Central Soybean Research Program and the Plant Health Initiative, is a comprehensive guide to SCN and how to manage it. The 16-page color publication covers the importance of SCN, what the pest is, how it affects soybeans, how it interacts with other diseases, what damage looks like, how to send in soil samples, a description of SCN biotypes, and recommendations for managing SCN.

Deemed the “silent robber of yields,” SCN is the No. 2 soybean pest in Ohio, behind Phytophthora sojae, which causes Phytophthora root rot. Soybean cyst nematodes feed on the roots of young plants, which prevents the roots from taking up vital nutrients.… Continue reading

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July 5 Update from between the Rows

The temperatures are up and the crops are coming along in this week’s report from Between the Rows. Here is the report from the farmers after the holiday weekend.

– Matt Reese

Kevin Miller

Williams County

“What a difference two weeks made. We had a gorgeous week of weather last week with low humidity and temperatures. We had some really nice second cutting hay and the quality was excellent. I would say we’re around half way done with second cutting in this area.

“Most guys got started last Wednesday and Thursday last week with wheat. I have today yet and I should be finished. My yields have been 85 to 90 bushels yields and my test weight has been 56 to 58 test weight. In our area, I do not think the vomitoxin is going to be a huge issue. I’ve heard 1 to 3 parts per million vomitoxin from elevators.… Continue reading

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Hog Market Outlook Remains Strong

By Jeff Caldwell

A blue moon — when there are 2 full moons in the same calendar month) has come around 15 times in the last 40 years. In that same time period, live hog prices have passed the $60-per-hundredweight mark 13 times.

So, $60-plus live hogs are rarer than a blue moon. But, that magic number was surpassed in May when live hogs hit $63/cwt. Though he expects the rarity of this occurrence to continue, Purdue University livestock economist Chris Hurt says it’s definitely not a sign that the hog market’s softening, at least for a while.

“The outlook is for strong and profitable prices to continue for some time, although with prices generally below the rare $60 mark,” says Purdue University livestock economist Chris Hurt.”

It’s an optimistic projection for market conditions that have been good to hog farmers since spring. But, one thing that has changed in the outlook, Hurt says, is the expectation for expansion.… Continue reading

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Vomitoxin, crop insurance and wheat growers at odds

By M

att Reese

Head scab has been showing up around the state in what may be the worst year for the disease in Ohio in the last decade. The vomitoxin in the grain resulting from the disease is creating a number of problems in the marketing and handling of the wheat.

“It does not seem like a major problem right here in my neighborhood in northern Wood County, but we have heard a lot of horror stories from the southern part of the state,” said Jay Griffith, vice president of the Ohio Wheat Growers Association.

In parts of northwest Ohio, there are reports of vomitoxin ranging from 5 to 10 parts per million. Further south in Morrow County, there are reports of vomitoxin levels of 3.3 up to 8.1 parts per million in the same variety from same field planted the same day. Even higher levels have been reported further south.… Continue reading

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Actual Agreement Between Ohio Ag & HSUS

1)    Recommendations will be made to The Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board (OLCSB) to take action on issues related to downer cattle and humane euthanasia using language consistent with the proposed ballot initiative.

2)    The Ohio Department of Agriculture and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources will coordinate and take action on wild and dangerous animals including the prohibition of the sale and/or possession of big cats, bears, primates, large constricting and venomous snakes and alligators and crocodiles. Existing owners will be grandfathered in, but they could not breed or obtain new animals.

3)    Recommendations will be made to the legislature to support and pass SB 95 largely in the current form, which regulates dog breeding kennels.

4)    Recommendations will be made to the legislature to support and pass HB 108, which will increase penalties on individuals who engage in cockfighting.

5)    Recommendations will be made to the OLCSB to adopt the American Veal Association 2007 agreement to transition to group housing for veal calves by 2017.… Continue reading

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Actual Agreement Between Ohio Ag & HSUS

1)    Recommendations will be made to The Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board (OLCSB) to take action on issues related to downer cattle and humane euthanasia using language consistent with the proposed ballot initiative.

2)    The Ohio Department of Agriculture and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources will coordinate and take action on wild and dangerous animals including the prohibition of the sale and/or possession of big cats, bears, primates, large constricting and venomous snakes and alligators and crocodiles. Existing owners will be grandfathered in, but they could not breed or obtain new animals.

3)    Recommendations will be made to the legislature to support and pass SB 95 largely in the current form, which regulates dog breeding kennels.

4)    Recommendations will be made to the legislature to support and pass HB 108, which will increase penalties on individuals who engage in cockfighting.

5)    Recommendations will be made to the OLCSB to adopt the American Veal Association 2007 agreement to transition to group housing for veal calves by 2017.… Continue reading

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Agriculture responds to HSUS agreement

The Ohio Farm Bureau Federation (OFBF) has announced its support for the agreement announced between the Ohioans for Livestock Care coalition and the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS).

The agreement validates Ohio voters’ decision last fall to pass State Issue 2, which established the Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board as the appropriate venue for defining acceptable farm animal care practices.

“One of animal agriculture’s most vocal critics has agreed that the Livestock Care Standards Board is the proper authority to handle difficult questions about farm animal care,” said Jack Fisher, OFBF executive vice president. “This is truly a milestone and confirms Ohio’s position as a national leader in farm animal care.”

Fisher also praised Gov. Ted Strickland for his efforts to create an agreement that will be good for Ohio farmers and consumers.

OFBF cited additional reasons for supporting the agreement. Farmers now have certainty for an extended period of time regarding housing regulations.… Continue reading

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HSUS Reaction to Agreement

Landmark Ohio Animal Welfare Agreement Reached Among HSUS, Ohioans for Humane Farms, Ohio Gov. Ted Strickland, and Ohio’s Leading Livestock Organizations

Phase Out of Extreme Confinement Systems for Breeding Pigs and Veal Calves; Immediate Moratorium on Battery Cage Construction, and Other Animal Welfare Reforms to Be Implemented

Gains in the Making on Puppy Mills, Cockfighting and Exotic Pet Trade

COLUMBUS, Ohio (June 30, 2010) – A deal struck among The Humane Society of the United States, Ohioans for Humane Farms, Ohio agriculture leaders and Ohio Gov. Ted Strickland will lead to major animal welfare improvements in Ohio on a raft of issues, reforming industry practices and improving prospects for adoption of critical legislation in other areas. The agreement puts a hold on a planned factory farming initiative on the fall ballot.

“I’m grateful to Governor Strickland and his administration for their outstanding leadership on these issues,” said Wayne Pacelle, HSUS president and CEO.… Continue reading

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No HSUS Ballot Initiative, Agreement Struck

Governor, Agricultural Leaders and Humane Society Announce Agreement to Remove HSUS Ballot Initiative, Enhance Animal Welfare and Care Standards

Columbus, OH – What almost sounded on its surface like a victory speech for the Humane Society of the United States at the press conference announcing an agreement with the group and Ohio agriculture is not what it appears. The concessions from Ohio agriculture are little more than some recommendations, a few maybes and a solid “I’ll-definitely-give-the-idea-some-serious-consideration.” In return, HSUS is giving up on their ballot measure this fall.

Ohio Governor Ted Strickland, the major organizations representing livestock producers and other agricultural interests and the Humane Society of the United States announced a joint agreement which will result in the Humane Society not pursuing a ballot initiative this fall and enhance animal welfare and animal care standards.

“This agreement represents a joint effort to find common ground.  As a result, Ohio agriculture will remain strong and animals will be treated better,” Strickland said. … Continue reading

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U.S. farmers plant record-high soybean crop

U.S. farmers planted 78.9 million acres of soybeans, exceeding last year’s planted area by 1.4 million acres, or 2%, and setting a new record high, according to the Acreage report released June 30 by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS).

Aided by favorable weather conditions early in the season, farmers in the Northern and Western Corn Belt and the Northeast increased their soybean acreage. Record-high planted acreage was reported in Kansas, Nebraska, New York and Pennsylvania, while Minnesota and Oklahoma tied their all-time record highs. Iowa continues to lead all states in total soybean acres with 10.2 million acres.

Farmers also planted a near record-breaking 87.9 million acres to corn, up 1.4 million acres from last year but down 1 percent from March. This marks the second consecutive increase in planted acreage to corn and the second highest acreage on record since 1946, only behind 2007.

Illinois and Kansas reported the largest increases in corn acres with both states planting 600,000 acres above last year.… Continue reading

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Coming energy debate must support corn ethanol

As Congress prepares for an Independence Day Recess to be followed by vigorous discussion of a new energy bill, the Ohio Corn Growers Association (OCGA) and National Corn Growers (NCGA) have stepped up a campaign to ensure that corn-based ethanol is part of the formula that brings our country to energy security and independence.

“A surplus of corn exists for all markets,” said Dwayne Siekman, OCGA Executive Director. “With nearly two-thirds of our oil imported, we need to focus on a broad range of domestic fuel solutions. We have a domestic supply that can be used.”

Legislation is before Congress to continue a much-needed incentive, called VEETC (a 45-cents-per-gallon tax credit) for fueling stations to blend ethanol with gasoline. In addition, there is a new energy bill on the horizon, making it an important and critical time to talk about ethanol’s many environmental and economic benefits to our country and the state of Ohio.… Continue reading

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Succeeding in critical conversations about agriculture

By Matt Reese

It is inevitable. Anyone who is involved in any type of agricultural production will be asked questions about farming and the food system at some point.

“Hi I am Jim,” the man says sitting next to you on the airplane. “I am an attorney in Chicago. What is it that you do?”

“Oh you’re a farmer, huh? Do you raise livestock with all of those steroids and antibiotics?”

Whether the farmer in question here raises corn and soybeans, chickens, cattle or backyard tomatoes, this critical conversation on a plane will help shape lawyer Jim’s perception of agriculture. This may be the only farmer Jim has ever met.

If the conversation goes well, Jim gains insight into modern agriculture and appreciation for the tremendous amount of work that goes into the food he enjoys every day. This positive impression will encourage Jim to be more willing to be supportive of farmers when he talks to his friends about his conversation on the plane, makes his food purchasing decisions or votes on an ag-related issue down the road.… Continue reading

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