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The 2010 wheat season: A look back as we move forward

By Pierce Paul, Dennis Mills, Katelyn Willyerd, Alissa Kriss, Ohio State University Extension

The 2010 wheat harvest has finished and, as we plan for the 2010-2011 season, let us take a quick look back and learn from this past crop. We had everything this year — head scab and vomitoxin, Stagonospora leaf and glume blotch, powdery mildew, leaf rust, head smut, cereal leaf beetle, plus a very hot late-spring-early-summer. The big problem this year was head scab and vomitoxin, with incidence ranging from 3% to 60% and vomitoxin from less than 1 to 18 parts per million (ppm). Both Stagonospora and powdery mildew were also very severe, with a severity score of 7 out of 10 this year. Diseases combined with a short grain fill period resulted in low to moderate yield and grain quality, with average yield ranging from 40 to 90 bushels per acre and test weight from 45 to 60 pounds per bushel.… Continue reading

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Researchers Taking Three-Pronged Approach to Flooding/Disease Impacts on Soybeans

Farmers’ hands are tied when it comes to managing soybean injury related to soil flooding and water-loving root rot diseases, but after several years of research at Ohio State University and U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, some promising solutions are on the horizon.

To combat the yield impacts associated with standing water, disease development and poor soil structure during heavy rains and flooding situations, Ohio State University plant scientists are taking a three-pronged approach to improving soybean health: molecular plant breeding, transgenics and soil management.

Over the past three years, USDA-ARS and Ohio State plant scientist Tara VanToai and her colleagues with the University Missouri—Delta Center have been analyzing 196 soybean lines that carry the genes of a flood-tolerant Asian variety and a flood-prone variety. The goal is to identify molecular markers in lines that exhibit flood tolerance to aid in developing flood-tolerant soybean varieties by molecular plant breeding.

“Out of that work, we have identified a handful of lines, less than 10, that show sufficient flood tolerance – 60 percent to 70 percent tolerance in standing water after 10 days,” said VanToai.

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Agritechnica and AG CONNECT Expo Announce Coordinated Dates

The two global agriculture trade exhibitions — Agritechnica in Europe and AG CONNECT Expo in North America — have coordinated the timing of their show dates for 2011 and 2013 for the convenience of exhibitors and attendees with global business interests. Show organizers said this schedule allows those interested in global agriculture to attend both events in those years. The shows are held biennially.

Agritechnica is the world’s largest agriculture machinery show while AG CONNECT Expo is North America’s global exhibition, both featuring the latest innovations in production agriculture.

In 2011, AG CONNECT Expo will be held January 8-10, 2011 (Preview Day January 7) at the Georgia World Congress Center, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. The 2011 Agritechnica will be held at the end of that year — November 15-19, 2011 at the Exhibition Grounds in Hanover, Germany (Preview Days November 13-14). The shows will next be held in 2013 — AG CONNECT Expo 2013 is scheduled for January 8-11, 2013 in Orlando, Florida and Agritechnica 2013 is slated for November 2013.… Continue reading

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A conversation with Jack Fisher, executive vice president Ohio Farm Bureau Federation, about the HSUS Agreement

OCJ: How does this agreement affect Issue 2 and the Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board?

Jack: The work farmers put into passing Issue 2 is paying off. Farmers said the Care Board was the proper way to handle complex questions about farm animal care. Ohio voters agreed. Now, HSUS acknowledges this. Without the Care Board, the only option to deal with animal issues would be costly, damaging ballot fights. That hasn’t worked out too well in other states.

Farm groups will now make recommendations to the Board that are believed to be acceptable ways to deal with some very contentious issues. The Board will consider recommendations from others as well. HSUS has committed to get in line with everyone else who wants to share an opinion. The Board will make its own decisions, just as intended under Issue 2.

OCJ: If the board doesn’t follow the recommendations, won’t HSUS just come back with its ballot initiative?Continue reading

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Local Foods, Natural Gas Extraction Topics for Oct. 21 Land-Use Conference

Land-use implications regarding everything from the extraction of natural gas from the vast Marcellus Shale to policy decisions geared to strengthen local food systems are on tap as topics for the 2010 Ohio Land Use Conference, set for Thursday, Oct. 21.

Sponsored by Ohio State University Extension, the annual land use conference typically attracts up to 150 elected officials, economic developers, local planners and community leaders, said Nancy Bowen-Ellzey, community development educator for OSU Extension and coordinator of this year’s conference.

“We always try to identify current, emerging issues so the sessions are relevant for participants,” Bowen-Ellzey said. This year’s sessions, some of which run concurrently, include:

Land Use Planning for Local Food Systems, with Holly Mattei, director of the Fairfield County Regional Planning Commission, and Katie Myers, farmland programs coordinator, Countryside Conservancy.

Regional Efforts to Mitigate Climate Change, with Matt McCauley, director for regional planning, Northwest Michigan Council of Governments.… Continue reading

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Fly Control Essential for Beef, Dairy Herd Health

 

Whether in the pasture or the barn, fly control is an essential part of keeping healthy dairy and beef cattle herds, said Purdue entomologist Ralph Williams.

In pasture cattle the two primary fly pests are horn flies, which are a biting fly, and face flies. Face flies do not bite, but they feed around the eye tissue and can transmit bacterial conjunctivitis, or pink eye.

“Horn flies are the number one fly pest in the United States,” Williams said. “The threshold at which we recommend control is when those flies reach 200 per animal. It is not uncommon to see a thousand or more horn flies per animal.”

While horn flies do not transmit disease, they can cause economic loss by reducing weight gain, feed efficiency and calf weights.

For cattle in confinement, the stable fly is a biting fly that breeds in the accumulating feed waste and soiled bedding.… Continue reading

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Time to park the pickup and walk the fields

By Bill Mullen

Jr., Director of Agronomic Services for Seed Consultants Inc.

Until we park the truck and walk our fields, we will never fully know the issues affecting crop development today. Walking fields of soybeans now will give us information on how the crop is actually handling the stress. There are various disease and insect issues to be aware of while walking fields, such as soybean cyst nematode, soybean aphids, sudden death syndrome, frogeye leaf spot, and white mold.
Now is the time to be scouting for soybean cyst nematode (SCN) in your fields. SCN injures soybean roots, and leads to stunted plants. There are not good above ground symptoms to indicate the presence of SCN in a field, especially when moisture is adequate. The cyst is found on the roots are filled with eggs which penetrate the roots and develop into adults in 14 to 21 days. As they develop, the cysts rupture the root, later die and then fall off into the soil.… Continue reading

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USDA Receives Signed Standard Reinsurance agreements from crop insurance companies

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsac announced that as of July 12, 2010, USDA’s Risk Management Agency (RMA) received signed 2011 Standard Reinsurance Agreements (SRA) from all 16 private insurance companies who participated in the federal crop insurance program during the 2010 crop year, formally ending the negotiation process which has been underway since December 2009. The new SRA negotiated by USDA is projected to achieve $6 billion in savings over the next 10 years, two-thirds of which will go toward paying down the federal deficit while the remaining third will support high-priority risk management and conservation programs.

“The new agreement that we have now finalized lays the foundation for a more sustainable federal crop insurance program, reduces the federal deficit, and improves the farm safety net for producers by providing incentives for companies to sell policies in all areas so that farmers and ranchers across the country can access these critical risk management tools,” Vilsack said.… Continue reading

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July Weather Outlook

By Jim Noel, CORN Newsletter
Not much change from a few months ago.

Above normal temperatures and near normal rainfall are forecast to continue for the rest of July.

As discussed in May, the trends and guidance supports near normal rainfall for the growing season after pre-growing season indicated some minor drought risk mainly in the northeast, but that quickly went away. We discussed in May that even though near normal is forecast for rainfall this growing season that the risk was to the wet side in the southwest and drier side in the northeast.

Overall, it has been wet in the western and southwest part of the state with average to slightly below average rainfall in the northeast this growing season: http://www.erh.noaa.gov/ohrfc/HAS/images/latest90daydepart.jpeg

With plenty of soil moisture alone, this will continue to support rainfall chances with not much longer than a week between rains seen anytime soon.… Continue reading

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Weekly crop progress numbers

Nationally, wheat harvest is 63% complete, compared to 61% this time last year and five year average of 65%. Corn is 38% silking compared to 19% last week. Seventy-three percent of corn is in good to excellent condition, up 2% from last week. Forty percent of soybeans are blooming, compared to 23% a week ago. Sixty-five percent of soybeans are rated good to excellent

In Ohio 95% of winter wheat is harvested. Forty-four percent of corn tasseled, compared to 10% last year. One percent of corn is in dough. Forty-three percent of soybeans were blooming, 20% ahead of last year an 8% ahead of the five-year average. Seventy-two percent of corn is rated good to excellent and 76% of soybeans.… Continue reading

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Monsanto Committed to Maintain Export Market Registrations for RR trait

The American Soybean Association (ASA), the American Farm Bureau Federation and the National Farmers Union (NFU) are pleased that Monsanto has committed to maintain export market approvals for the first biotech soybean trait “Roundup Ready” or “RR1” through 2021. Monsanto will officially communicate this commitment to all of its licensees. With the patent on RR1 due to expire in 2014, and patents on other traits expiring in future years, ASA has been actively working to develop pathways that will facilitate the continued availability of traits to soybean farmers as single generic traits or as part of stacked traits after patent expiration.
“Agriculture is blazing a new trail as the patents on first generation of biotech-enhanced seed traits begin to expire,” said Rob Joslin, ASA President and a soybean farmer from Sidney, Ohio. “While supporting patent protection for traits as a key driver for continued soybean seed industry investment and innovation, ASA desires competition to flourish, generic traits to be available in the marketplace, and prices for seed containing generic traits to decline once trait patents expire.”… Continue reading

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Carl Rittberger Sr., Inc. Issues Precautionary Recall for Product produced without Inspection

Carl Rittberger Sr., Inc. of Zanesville, OH announces a voluntary recall of approximately 15 pounds of Sliced Bacon due to the fact that the product was produced without the benefit of Sate Inspection by the Ohio Department of Agriculture’s Division of Meat Inspection.

“As defined by the Class II category of the recall, the possibility of a food safety hazard is remote. It was simply a mistake on my part to not notify Meat Inspection of minimal production on that specific day of production.” said Andy Rittberger, President, Carl Rittberger Sr., Inc.

The product subject to recall include: 20 – 12 oz. packages of Sliced Bacon

Product: RITTBERGER Sliced Bacon 12 oz package

Identified by: Produced by Carl Rittberger Sr., Inc., Zanesville, Ohio.
The packages include Ohio Establishment #13, they include 12 oz. packages with the sell by date of 8/28/10

Manufacture date: 7/09/10

The packages were sold exclusively at the Zanesville Farmer’s Market on 7/10/10.… Continue reading

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EPA still stalling on ethanol decision

By Matt Reese

When it comes to making the decision about increasing the non-mandated ethanol blend limit from the current 10% to 15%, the U.S. EPA continues to fumble the ball. Ethanol supporters are thinking now may be the time for Congress to pick it up.
“EPA promised in June, they promised in July and now they’re talking about late fall to announce the decision,” said Dwayne Siekman, CEO of the Ohio Corn Growers Association. “There are two pieces of legislation in DC on this issue, one in the Senate and one in the House. Right now in the Ohio Congressional Delegation, we have one co-sponsor and that is Marcy Kaptur.”
With increased support of lawmakers, the ethanol industry is poised to take the country to a future of increased renewable fuel use.
“Corn growers believe a strong commitment to domestic energy production can supply the nation’s thirst for dependable, safe and abundant energy.… Continue reading

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USDA: Corn, Soybean Conditions Dip Slightly

By Jeff Caldwell

Varying weather forecasts have farmers wondering whether Tuesdays’ USDA Crop Progress numbers are the start of a downward trend or just a seasonal dip in conditions.

Tuesday’s weekly report from USDA — delayed a day by the Independence Day holiday earlier this week — shows both corn and soybean conditions dipped slightly from the previous week. At 71% and 66% good to excellent respectively, the corn and soybean crops both slipped, but the corn number is just 2% lower than a week ago, and the soybean number’s just 1% below last week.

Much of the slight decline can be blamed on excess moisture, some farmers say. But, a look into the forecast beyond the next week is causing others to worry that the opposite problem — one some weather-watchers have foreshadowed for months — will become the biggest crop threat through the end of this month.

“Starting about the 14th of July, temps are showing a high of 95-97 degrees.… Continue reading

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Ag Leader Technology, Inc. introduces INTEGRA display

Ag Leader’s SMS™ Basic or SMS™ Advanced desktop software helps achieve this process by facilitating variety map integration from an array of collection devices. This new feature allows more growers to see variety maps on the INTEGRA display while harvesting, seeing hybrid/variety yield results in real time.
“For a long time growers have used our yield monitor to compare varieties at harvest. However, the field had to be harvested with the same display that planted the field to see the variety map in real time,” says New Business Development Manager, Roger Zielke. “I’m happy to say this added feature gives our customers a solution, regardless of their planting display. SMS-compatible data can be read into the software to create a reference file. That file is then loaded on to the INTEGRA display to show the variety map at harvest.”
Using SMS software to generate variety maps helps farming operations with multiple precision ag displays or mixed fleets of precision ag equipment in the operation.… Continue reading

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Get the Facts on Starting an Aquaculture Business at an Ohio Fish Farm Tour, July 16

Anyone interested in starting an aquaculture business, or perhaps expanding an existing one, has the opportunity to participate in a tour of fish farms throughout northeast Ohio on July 16.

Ohio State University’s South Centers at Piketon and Ohio Soybean Council will sponsor the event, which runs from 7:45 a.m. until 6 p.m. The cost is $20 per person.

The Northeast Ohio Fish Farm Tour will feature stops at Scales to Tails, Laurel Creek Fin Farm, Raber’s Fish Farm, Fender’s Fish Hatchery, and Blue Ribbon Fish Farm. Participants will meet at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center’s Fisher Auditorium at 7:45 a.m. before departing on the tour. The tour is schedule to arrive back at OARDC around 6 p.m. OARDC is located at 1680 Madison Avenue, Wooster, Ohio.

Scales to Tails Seafood Shoppe sells live fish and fresh filets. The shop also boasts a large processing facility. Owners Dave and Wendy Lemke also raise tilapia, yellow perch, bluegill and largemouth bass.… Continue reading

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National Pork Board to meet during National Pork Industry Conference

Planning for the National Pork Board’s 2011 budget begins in earnest next week when board members meet July 13 to review revenue projections from the Pork Checkoff and to set a spending target for the new budget year. The board is meeting during the three-day National Pork Industry Conference at Wisconsin Dells, Wis.

The board, under the leadership of newly elected president Gene Nemechek, will welcome four new pork producer members recently appointed to three-years terms by Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack: Julie Maschoff from Carlyle, Ill.; Derrick Sleezer from Cherokee, Iowa; Wathina Luthi from Gage, Okla.; and Steve Wuergler from Drain, Ore. The board also will pay tribute to four retiring board members: Tim Bierman, a Larrabee, Iowa, producer who as the immediate past president remains on the board for one year as a non-voting member; Steve Weaver of Elk Grove, Calif.; Bruce Samson of Three Forks, Mont.; and Henry Moore of Clinton, N.C.Continue reading

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Feeding Wheat Grain to Livestock? Get it Tested for Vomitoxin First

In a year when overly wet conditions and a head scab outbreak are significantly impacting Ohio’s wheat crop, there is no room for assumptions that grain is toxin-free and safe to feed to livestock.

To avoid any health problems in cattle, swine, poultry and other animals, growers are highly encouraged to test the grain for vomitoxin levels before any of the feed or grain byproduct is destined for consumption.

“Farmers shouldn’t think that it’s OK to handle or feed scabby grain without actually testing and knowing how much toxin is in it,” said Pierce Paul, an Ohio State University Extension small grains specialist and plant pathologist. “I always emphasize testing.”

Wheat in some portions of Ohio is experiencing upwards of 60 percent incidence of head scab — a disease that attacks the wheat during flowering under wet, humid conditions. The disease can impact yields. The fungal pathogen that causes head scab also produces mycotoxins (most notably vomitoxin) in the grain that can be unsafe for livestock if consumed in high levels.… Continue reading

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What’s New at This Year’s Farm Science Review

Throughout its 48-year history, Ohio State University’s Farm Science Review has been at the forefront of showcasing the future of agriculture.

From the first no-till demonstrations to the introduction of big farm equipment to breakthrough research on crop diseases, Farm Science Review has always been the place for visitors to see the “newest” in agriculture, as well as conservation, home improvement, health, safety, money management, gardening and education.

“Farm Science Review embraces change. It’s just amazing to look at how far we’ve come and where we’ll be going,” said Farm Science Review manager Chuck Gamble. “We are constantly looking at new technologies, and new products and services, and their representation at the show is an asset to our visitors.”

Farm Science Review, Ohio’s premiere agricultural event, will take place Sept. 21-23 at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center in London, Ohio. Sponsored by the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, the event attracts upwards of 140,000 visitors from all over the country and Canada.… Continue reading

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What's New at This Year's Farm Science Review

Throughout its 48-year history, Ohio State University’s Farm Science Review has been at the forefront of showcasing the future of agriculture.

From the first no-till demonstrations to the introduction of big farm equipment to breakthrough research on crop diseases, Farm Science Review has always been the place for visitors to see the “newest” in agriculture, as well as conservation, home improvement, health, safety, money management, gardening and education.

“Farm Science Review embraces change. It’s just amazing to look at how far we’ve come and where we’ll be going,” said Farm Science Review manager Chuck Gamble. “We are constantly looking at new technologies, and new products and services, and their representation at the show is an asset to our visitors.”

Farm Science Review, Ohio’s premiere agricultural event, will take place Sept. 21-23 at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center in London, Ohio. Sponsored by the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, the event attracts upwards of 140,000 visitors from all over the country and Canada.… Continue reading

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