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Requests for Stink Bug Information Met With Overwhelming Response

With the help of homeowners, Ohio State University Extension entomologists have compiled plenty of statewide data on the brown marmorated stink bug, a relatively new pest to Ohio that not only damages crops but takes up overwintering residence in homes.

“From the data we’ve received so far, we know that Ohio is inundated with the stink bug,” said OSU Extension entomologist Ron Hammond. “At this time, we have enough data to work with, so we no longer need assistance. But we greatly appreciate the help we’ve received from homeowners in our research efforts.”

OSU Extension county offices have been overwhelmed with phone calls and e-mails the past week from homeowners reporting the presence of the brown marmorated stink bug in their homes.

Researchers are interested in tracking the range of the pest in order to develop ways to control the insect and prevent it from damaging crops or populating homes.… Continue reading

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Pork Checkoff Supports Return of McRib® Nationwide

For the first time since 1994, McDonald’s McRib® sandwich is available in all participating restaurants nationwide through November.

“The Checkoff was instrumental in the first national rollout of the McRib,” said Paul Perfilio, national foodservice marketing manager for the Checkoff. “This year the pork logo will be prominently featured on special McRib tray liners at all participating restaurants nationwide.”

The McRib is made with 100 percent USDA-quality pork and is served on a toasted, golden-brown home style roll. The boneless, seasoned pork patty is dressed with fresh slivered onions, two dill pickle slices and a one-of-a kind sweet, smoky, tangy, western barbeque style sauce.

“Each year the return of the McRib promotion in different regions of the country brings pork back to the top of consumers’ minds and that is great for everyone involved,” said Dianne Bettin, a pork producer from Truman, Minn., and chair of the Domestic Marketing Committee. “The McRib has had a lot of success as a limited-time menu item.”… Continue reading

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Research shows Ohio Ag Net is most listened to farm radio network in the state

Ohio Ag Net Reaches the Most Farmers in Ohio

A recent media study conducted by Ag Media Research (AMR) reveals that the Ohio Ag Net radio network reaches more Ohio farmers than any other farm broadcast network or radio station in the state.  The Ohio Ag Net has a 35% higher average quarter hour share (AQH) than the closest competitor. In addition the AMR research reveals that the Cume rating for soybean farmers is 50.9, corn farmers 50.8 and wheat farmers 54.1.

The AMR study in Ohio is conducted every other year and is considered the standard of audience measurement by the agrimarketing community.

“This is a result of the Ohio Ag Net actively partnering with local affiliate radio stations to reach farmers in Ohio,” said Bart Johnson, president and founder of the Ohio Ag Net. “We worked with stations to develop programming they could deliver at farmer friendly listening times.”… Continue reading

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Nov. 20 NAP crop deadline


Steve Maurer, the Ohio Farm Service Agency (FSA) State Executive Director, would like to remind producers that they have until November 20, 2010 to sign-up for the 2011 Non-insured Assistance Program (NAP) crop coverage.  This deadline applies to the following crops: Apples, Asparagus, Blueberries, Caneberries, Cherries, Chestnuts, Forage for Hay and Pasture, Grapes, Nectarines, Peaches, Pears, Plums, Strawberries, Honey and Maple Syrup.
NAP covers losses caused by damaging weather conditions.  Producers receive a payment when the loss is in excess of 50 percent.  Losses are generally determined by the percentage of loss compared to the producer’s actual yield history.  Eligible production losses are paid at 55 percent of the established value for the crop.
The service fee is $250 per crop per county or $750 per producer per county.  The fee cannot exceed a total of $1875 per producer with farming interest in multiple counties.  Limited resource producers may request a waiver of service fees.
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Pioneer Hi-Bred introduces 29 new soybean varieties for 2011

With the total package of improved agronomic, defensive and yield-boosting traits in mind, Pioneer Hi-Bred, a DuPont business, is adding 29 new soybean varieties to its 2011 lineup.

“Each year Pioneer is focused on raising the bar for its soybean products, bolstering benefits to growers,” says Don Schafer, Pioneer senior marketing manager – soybeans. “That means not only providing varieties with broad agronomic and defensive traits, but also making sure yield potential is there as well. With this year’s new products, we’ve done just that.” 


These new Pioneer® brand soybean varieties, which range from Group 00 through mid-Group V, include 20 varieties with soybean cyst nematode resistance (three of which offer the Peking source of resistance), four non-glyphosate resistant varieties and one new low linolenic product. 


Key products in this year’s lineup include the following:

900Y71 – This is a new leader product well-suited for the northern Red River Valley of Minnesota and North Dakota, and into Manitoba, Canada.… Continue reading

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Study demonstrates Ohioans eating more wheat

A September study demonstrates that Ohio consumers are making a conscious effort to include more wheat and wheat products in their diets.

A notable 55% of the 200 citizens surveyed are deliberately consuming wheat on a day-to-day basis.

Wheat is America’s most consumed grain and is also the principal ingredient of flour.

“Ohio’s wheat farmers have an ample supply to meet demand,” said Mark Wachtman, president of the Ohio Wheat Growers Association (OWGA). “Ohio produced 46 million bushels this year. Wheat has already been planted this fall and we are optimistic that production will increase in 2011.”

All grains begin as whole grains. If all three parts of the original grain — the germ, bran and endosperm — remain in their original proportions after milling, the end product still qualifies as a whole grain.

Wheat contains large amounts of protein, fiber, vitamins and minerals. Research has shown its influence in reducing the risk of diabetes, breast cancer, gallstones, inflammation and several cardiovascular conditions.… Continue reading

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Ohio Corn & Wheat Growers Association is set to launch in 2011

Throughout the past year, grower leaders have participated in the Structure Task Force to represent the interests of Ohio producers of corn and wheat to build the identity of a new organization — the Ohio Corn & Wheat Growers Association.

The new organization is a result of an ongoing relationship between the Ohio Corn Growers Association (OCGA) and the Ohio Wheat Growers Association (OWGA), which was formalized six years ago. The relationship began with shared staff, but grew throughout the years with joint membership meetings, legislative visits, public campaigns and policy-development synergies.

“From my perspective, the process to explore a new organization just made sense,” said OWGA President Mark Wachtman. “In Ohio, many of the issues we face are not as a grower of one crop, but as a producer of grains and oilseeds that allow us to successfully manage our farm. I grow a variety of crops on my farm, including corn, soybeans and wheat, and this is often the case in Ohio.… Continue reading

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Ohio Corn & Wheat Growers Association is set to launch in 2011

Throughout the past year, grower leaders have participated in the Structure Task Force to represent the interests of Ohio producers of corn and wheat to build the identity of a new organization — the Ohio Corn & Wheat Growers Association.

The new organization is a result of an ongoing relationship between the Ohio Corn Growers Association (OCGA) and the Ohio Wheat Growers Association (OWGA), which was formalized six years ago. The relationship began with shared staff, but grew throughout the years with joint membership meetings, legislative visits, public campaigns and policy-development synergies.

“From my perspective, the process to explore a new organization just made sense,” said OWGA President Mark Wachtman. “In Ohio, many of the issues we face are not as a grower of one crop, but as a producer of grains and oilseeds that allow us to successfully manage our farm. I grow a variety of crops on my farm, including corn, soybeans and wheat, and this is often the case in Ohio.… Continue reading

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Soil testing still important in dry conditions

Farmers shouldn’t stop analyzing soil samples to determine lime and fertilizer needs despite the effects drought and low soil moisture might have on the results, a Purdue University agronomist says.

“Accurate analysis of representative soil samples to determine lime and fertilizer needs is fundamental to crop production,” said Jim Camberato. “Unfortunately, persistent, dry weather resulting in prolonged periods of low soil moisture can affect potassium and pH, resulting in somewhat misleading results.”

Soil tests can be useful in dry weather if farmers understand the way low moisture can affect potassium and pH test results.

In a dry fall, soil test potassium levels often are lower than expected because most of the potassium the crop had taken up during the growing season remained in the crop residue. There wasn’t enough rainfall to return it to the soil.

“This is a larger issue with corn than soybeans because corn stover contains much more potassium than soybean straw,” Camberato said.… Continue reading

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New wildlife/hunting area open in Marion County

Pheasants Forever and partners have added 300 acres of quality wildlife habitat in Ohio that will be open to public hunting and recreation with the creation of the new Beaver Wildlife Area in Marion County.

Located just southwest of the town of Marion, the new Beaver Wildlife Area is named after the Beaver family (Dave Beaver, Mark Beaver, Alex Beaver and Janis Beaver Loch), which owned and operated the farm for five generations. Thanks to the family and additional partners, the mix of tallgrass prairie, wetlands and oak savanna will be open in perpetuity. The Beaver family donated a percentage of the land value back to Pheasants Forever to manage and maintain the farm. Other funding sources included the Clean Ohio Fund and the Department of Natural Resources, Ohio Division of Wildlife (DOW). The property will be owned by The Forever Land Trust, a subsidiary of Pheasants Forever, and managed in cooperation with the DOW, which will annex it into the 5,722 acres Big Island Wildlife Area.… Continue reading

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Winter wheat is off to a good start

With nearly all of Ohio’s winter wheat planted, according to the Ohio Agricultural Statistics Service, farmers are on track for a potentially successful crop.

“This year, corn and soybeans have come off in a timely manner, so most of our wheat has been planted under decent conditions. Reports from across the state indicate that wheat so far is looking good,” said Pierce Paul, an Ohio State University wheat specialist with the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center.

Paul said that because of the early harvest of corn and soybeans, farmers got a jump on good wheat establishment. In some cases, this included planting before the Hessian fly free date, which could potentially lead to some disease problems in the spring due to fall establishment of some pathogens.

“Farmers are saying that they plant before the Hessian fly free date because they don’t recall ever seeing the Hessian fly,” said Paul. “Not only is the Hessian fly free date about the Hessian fly, it’s also about planting at a time when you can get adequate tiller development without excessive early disease development.”… Continue reading

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Tips for evaluating sales information

By Robert Mullen, Ohio State University Extension

Now that crop harvest is winding down, many companies that conduct field experimentation will be getting out and sharing their success stories, so how can you weed through the information to find the truth?

The first thing I often say as it relates to fertilizer products (but this likely extends to other agronomic products/practices) is “if it sounds too good to be true, it likely is.”  The first thing to look for when evaluating yield data from field trials is to look for some information regarding how field experimentation was done.  This does not require you to have a statistical background.  Simple questions like – “Was the study replicated?”, “How many locations were utilized?”, “Were there any locations that did not respond positively (environmental interactions)?”  To my knowledge, no agronomic practice (within reason) results in a yield increase every time it is evaluated.  So if someone states, “we conducted field research on 50 fields, and we saw a yield increase every time,” be suspicious.… Continue reading

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SUNCO NutriMate 3

Sunco has been building planter attachments for over 25 years. The goal at Sunco is and always has been

producing equipment to make farming more efficient, cost effective and profitable.

Over the years we have seen many changes and improvements to farming practices and farm implements.

Sunco planter attachments have been part of these improvements. This is evident with the introduction of the

Nutri Mate 3.

Like the NutriMate II, the NutriMate 3 unit is designed to be mounted to the row unit of the planter. The

parallel links of the planter let the NutriMate 3 float and the row unit gauge wheels provide depth control so

nutrients are precisely placed in relation to the seed.

The unique frame design allows the discs to be pulled through the field instead of being pushed, and the discs

are allowed to pivot slightly to the left or right to keep the fertilizer opener discs trailing properly on curves and

contours.… Continue reading

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Ohio farms pay heavy toll for clean water violations

Last month, an Ohio pork producer received stiff fines and prison time, and a dairy owner and manure applicator also agreed to a heavy financial toll as a result of water pollution violations.

On Oct. 19, William H. Ringler, the owner and operator of Steamtown Farm, a 2,500-head pig-feeding operation in Ashley (Morrow and Delaware counties), was sentenced in U.S. District Court to three months imprisonment, three months of electronic monitoring, a fine of $51,750 and a restitution payment of $17,250 to Ohio EPA for allowing an unpermitted discharge that killed more than 36,700 fish and other small aquatic animals in June 2007.

Thousands of gallons of liquid whey, a dairy by-product used as a feed supplement for the pigs, leaked twice in eight days from a 26,000-gallon tank on Ringler’s farm, which is recognized as a concentrated animal feeding operation (CAFO) and monitored by the state. The whey entered the farm’s drainage system and flowed into the west branch of

Alum Creek where it reduced dissolved oxygen levels.… Continue reading

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USDA announces assistance to Ohio ag

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced that USDA is providing help to Ohio farmers through multiple programs.

First, USDA is offering loan guarantees and grants to agricultural producers and business owners across Ohio to enable them to reduce energy use and increase efficiency.

“These loan guarantees and grants will generate and save energy for Ohio’s farmers and businesses for decades to come,” Vilsack said. “Renewable energy systems like the biodigester that generates electricity for this research center are among the many ways USDA is helping the country become more energy independent.”

The $6 million in funding announced today is authorized through the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (Farm Bill) and is administered by USDA Rural Development through the Rural Energy for America Program (REAP).

Some farm owners have been selected to receive funding to replace older grain dryers with energy efficient models. Others are installing renewable energy systems.  For example, French Creek BioEnergy, LLC has been selected for a $500,000 REAP grant and a $1,650,000 guaranteed loan to construct an anaerobic digester that will produce 6.7 million kilowatts of energy annually. … Continue reading

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American Goat Federation completes incorporation

The American Goat Federation (AGF), the first-ever national organization devoted to the entire goat industry, proudly announces its incorporation. The purpose of the AGF will be to build and define the U.S. goat industry on a unified front to work on issues facing the whole industry.

“The AGF will strive to promote and facilitate the development of all segments of the goat industry including dairy, meat and fiber by encouraging sound public policy, enhancing production and marketing of goat products and promoting research beneficial to member organizations and all producers,” explains Tom Boyer, AGF president and Utah sheep and goat producer.

Boyer is joined on the board by Robin Saum (Ohio), vice president; An Peischel (Tenn.), secretary/treasurer; and board members Steve Burton (Utah), Linda Campbell (Va.), Brian Faris, Ph.D. (Kan.), Will Getz, Ph.D. (Ga.), Shawn Harper (Ky.), Katherine Harrison (Ohio), Pierce Miller (Texas) and Sandra Miller (Pa.).

Currently, the organization is completing membership development guidelines and seeks to actively represent the interests of more than 100 organizations and thousands of producers engaged in the sustainable production and marketing of goat milk, meat, fiber and grazing services across the United States.… Continue reading

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Study finds GISPSA to be costly regulation

An economic impact study conducted by John Dunham and Associates, Inc. concludes that the Obama Administration’s proposed rule on livestock marketing could leave approximately 104,000 additional Americans without jobs. Consequently, the study reports a $14 billion reduction in the National Gross Domestic Product.

“The estimated rate of producer job loss in rural America would be high. When folks are forced out of the livestock industry, they don’t come back,” said Sam Carney, National Pork Producers Council president. “Given this study, it is now more important than ever for USDA to conduct a thorough economic analysis so that producers understand the true cost of the Administration’s proposed regulations.”

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration proposed the rule on June 21, 2010, in response to a request made by Congress. However, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association President (NCBA) Steve Foglesong said the rule goes beyond the intent of Congress and serves as another example of government overreach into private business. 

… Continue reading

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