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OSU students and organizations honored at annual recognition banquet

The 59th Annual College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Recognition Program highlighted many outstanding faculty, students and student organizations. The banquet was dedicated to Dean Bobby Moser and his wife, Pat. The event was organized by Suzie McMullen, junior in agricultural and extension education and Lindy Smith, senior in animal sciences. Visit the photo gallery for more images from the evening. (Photos by Lyndsey Murphy).

Towers Faculty Award: Dr. Jill Pfister

Outstanding First Year Students: Blake Spitznagel, an agricultural communications major from Cincinnati & Joey Brown, animal sciences major from Edon

Medard Ruehle Scholarship: Beverly Lennartz, junior in agribusiness and applied economics from Fort Recovery

Outstanding Service to Students: Dr. Jill Pfister & Dr. Bobby Moser

New Activity Award: Alpha Zeta Partners, Run for their Lives 5K

Ray A. Miller CFAES Student Council Scholarship: Derek McCracken, junior in agricultural education from Anna and Linsey Howell, junior in agribusiness and applied economics from Danville

Top 10 Seniors:

Dustin Homan, agricultural & extension education, Anna

Krystin Bachman, animal sciences, Lancaster

Hannah Crossen, agricultural & extension education, Jeromesville

Drew Enigk, animal sciences, Cincinnati

Laura Gordon, animal sciences and ag systems management, Shreve

Elizabeth Heitkamp-Coons, agricultural communications, Versailles

Kate Stevens, animal sciences, Columbus

Alison Park, animal sciences, Burgoon

Emily Stayduhar, animal sciences, Canonsburg, PA

Abigail Snyder, food science, chemistry & English, Kingston

 … Continue reading

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Dairy Palooza

By Bonnie Ayars, OSU Dairy Program Specialist

Held on April 28th at the Wayne County Fairgrounds, nearly 275 attendees representing 30 Ohio counties traveled to Ohio’s Dairy Palooza hosted by a volunteer committee working with the 4-H dairy youth specialist, Bonnie Ayars. Although Mother Nature was having a mood swing outside with a variety of chilly weather, the atmosphere inside was filled with enthusiasm.

Dairy Palooza 2012 was a one-day educational program for dairy youth enthusiasts and leaders interested in learning more about dairy projects with hands on activities that related to current topics of concern. Printed resources and informational items were carefully bound in notebooks and distributed at the registration table. These were connected to each of the workshop sessions. There was a red bucket that became the tote for a rope halter, a feed scoop, the binder of resources, and all the items from the career fair.

The day included 4 separate sessions and within each of these, 4 workshops were offered with suggested level of experiences ranging from cloverbuds and beginners to intermediates and seniors.… Continue reading

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More resistant weeds popping up around the country

Herbicide-resistant waterhemp populations will challenge weed management practices and practitioners during the 2012 growing season.

University of Illinois associate professor of weed science Aaron Hager said that the increasing occurrence of waterhemp populations that possess resistance to herbicides spanning more than one site of action further complicates management because the efficacy of multiple herbicides is compromised.

Last year, University of Illinois weed science specialists published the results of a herbicide-resistance screening program for waterhemp samples submitted during the 2010 growing season. The program uses molecular biology techniques to detect herbicide-resistance traits (glyphosate, PPO inhibitors, and ALS inhibitors) in waterhemp. In 2011, a total of 408 plants from 97 different fields suspected of having glyphosate-resistant waterhemp were submitted.

Hager explained that distinguishing between multiple herbicide resistance at the field and individual plant levels is important and can impact management options.

“Field-level multiple resistance is when resistance to herbicides from more than one site of action is present within the population growing in any particular field,” he said.… Continue reading

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Ohio Ag Council announces 2012 Hall of Fame Inductees

Four Ohioans who have committed their lives to working in, promoting and advocating for Ohio’s farm community will be honored Friday, August 3, 2012, by the Ohio Agricultural Council (OAC), when they are inducted into the Ohio Agricultural Hall of Fame.

The Ohio Agricultural Council (OAC) will induct Dr. Charles Lifer of Columbus, Dr. Bobby Moser of Dublin, Dr. Donald Myers of Dover, and Micheal (“Micki”) Zartman of Worthington, into the Ohio Agricultural Hall of Fame during a special breakfast ceremony held in the Rhodes Youth Center at the Ohio Expo Center. The 47th annual event will attract 500 guests to honor these four professionals for their lifetime of service and dedication to Ohio’s agriculture community.

“Our Board is extraordinarily pleased to be honoring such a diverse group of inductees into this year’s class,” said David Barrett, OAC president.  “Each inductee stands out individually for his or her exceptional contributions  to Ohio agriculture, but together they represent the passion, creativity and hard work evidenced by their collective decades of unmatched experience.”… Continue reading

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Oil industry says EPA “rushed to judgment” on E15

Ty Higgins, Ohio Ag Net

As E15 inches closer to being available around the country, the American Petroleum Institute is accusing the Environmental Protection Agency of not doing its homework before approving the sale of gasoline containing 15% ethanol.

An API-funded review of studies on equipment compatibility with E15 produced sobering results, according to Bob Greco, the Institute’s Director for Downstream and Industry Operations.

“An estimated half of the existing retail outlet equipment is not compatible with E15,” Greco said. “Unfortunately it may be hard for a station to know if its equipment is or is not compatible. This could discourage many of the nation’s 157,000 gasoline retail outlets from selling E15.”

Without a market for higher ethanol blends, Greco said the federal biofuels mandate could result in higher compliance costs or production constraints that could place upward pressure on gasoline prices for consumers.

API says EPA has done an inadequate job of answering questions surrounding E15, in particular dispensing equipment and other infrastructure implications.… Continue reading

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Vilsack makes a student loan appeal to FFA

By Ty Higgins, Ohio Ag Net

Ag Secretary Tom Vilsack got on the phone Monday with FFA students to discuss the need to prevent student loan interest rates from doubling on July 1. The Obama administration and Congress agree student loan interest rates need to stay low, but they can’t agree on how to pay for it.

Vilsack told the FFA members the administration prefers the Senate’s approach to paying for it, closing tax loopholes, over the House’s desire to offset the extra spending by eliminating a women’s preventative health program in President Obama’s health care overhaul.

“There are some concerns on the part of the administration that preventative healthcare ought not to be cut,” Vilsack said. “Particularly for those in rural areas where we are dealing with a healthcare system that has not favorably treated rural residents. We end up paying more out of pocket and having poorer results and less access.… Continue reading

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NRCS funding available for Great Lakes Basin

More than $24 million is available to agricultural producers and landowners to improve and protect the waters and resources in the Great Lakes Basin, announced Terry Cosby, State Conservationist for the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). Applications to install specific conservation practices through the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) are being accepted for priority ranking through June 8, 2012.

Producers in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin can apply at their local USDA office for funding through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP), the Wildlife Habitat Incentive Program (WHIP), and the Conservation Technical Assistance Program (CTAP). NRCS specialists provide farmers and ranchers with technical assistance to help determine the best conservation practices to improve and protect the resources on their land.

All eight states are using the same dates for the sign-up. Interested landowners should contact their local USDA office before June 8, 2012, to apply.… Continue reading

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Pioneer Hi-Bred Launches Replant Calculator

A new tool with will help producers decide whether to keep their current stand or replant when crops have been impacted by weather, pests or other issues. Pioneer Hi-Bred is offering a replant calculator on Mobile Pioneer dot com. It takes into account the original date for planting, original stand target and resulting plant population and the possible replanting date. Growers are then asked to consider their own likely replanting seed and input costs. The calculator will provide estimates associated with the current stand and replant stand.

The calculator is based on a long-standing chart developed by Dr. Emerson Nafziger of the University of Illinois. It illustrates the effects of planting date and plant population on grain yield for the Corn Belt. It also accounts for the current shift to higher populations as suggested by Pioneer research and data.

The replant calculator is part of a suite of tools available on www.pioneer.comContinue reading

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BEST Program banquet

The Ohio Cattlemen’s Association (OCA) invites you to support youth in the BEST Program as the 2011-2012 year wraps up with the annual Awards Banquet held at the Ohio Expo Center in Columbus. Several representatives from program sponsors Bob Evans Farms, Farm Credit Services of Mid-America, Green Oak Farms, M.H. Eby, Ohio Farm Bureau Federation and Burroughs Frazier Farms will be attending to present awards totaling more than $35,000 in belt buckles, furniture, jackets, show materials and other awards.

The evening will feature the accomplishments of more than 315 youth participants who nominated more than 415 head of market animals and heifers into the program. Each participant in the program will receive a participant ward courtesy of the program’s sponsors. Additionally, 180 total individual awards will be presented which includes 42 champion and reserve awards, top 10 crossbred steers, 10 bred-and-owned winners, top 10 novice market animal and heifer exhibitors and 48 showmanship winners.… Continue reading

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Ohio Weekly Crop Progress Report-May 7, 2012

The average temperature for the State was 68.1 degrees, 12.7 degrees above normal for the week ending Sunday, May 6, 2012. Precipitation averaged 1.91 inches, 1.02 inches above normal. There were 116 modified growing degree days, 53 days above normal. Reporters rated 3.6 days suitable for fieldwork during the seven-day period ending Friday, May 4, 2012. Topsoil moisture was rated 0 percent very short, 10 percent short, 69 percent adequate, and 21 percent surplus.

FIELD ACTIVITIES AND CROP PROGRESS

Temperatures and precipitation for the State changed noticeably as the week progressed. The week started cool and dry, but warmer weather later in the week brought much needed rain. Reporters still indicated that field conditions were still slightly dryer than usual for this time of year. The large temperature swing placed a slight amount of stress on livestock, but the rain was needed to help germinate newly planted crops. Other field activities for the week include hauling grain and application of fertilizer and herbicide.

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Students can still submit entries to ‘Ag is Cool’ contest

With just 79 days until the Ohio State Fair, the Ohio Department of Agriculture is encouraging students (K-12) to submit their entries for the 2012 “Agriculture is Cool!” Creative Expressions contest. Ohio children enrolled in school or home schooled during the 2011-2012 academic year have until July 9, 2012 to capture their personal interpretation of why Ohio agriculture is cool for their chance to win two tickets to see The Band Perry at the Ohio State Fair.

Entries, which can include an original video, photograph, drawing, or painting, will be judged in the following age categories. One winner from each age group and category will be chosen:

Grades K-2: Photography, Drawing or Painting
Grades 3-5: Video, Photography, Drawing or Painting
Grades 6-8: Video, Photography, Drawing or Painting
Grades 9-12: Video, Photography, Drawing or Painting

All entries will be reviewed by a panel of judges that may include representatives from the Ohio Department of Agriculture, the Office of the Governor, the Ohio Expo Center, and professionals in the areas of video production, photography, drawing, painting and other visual arts.… Continue reading

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Students can still submit entries to 'Ag is Cool' contest

With just 79 days until the Ohio State Fair, the Ohio Department of Agriculture is encouraging students (K-12) to submit their entries for the 2012 “Agriculture is Cool!” Creative Expressions contest. Ohio children enrolled in school or home schooled during the 2011-2012 academic year have until July 9, 2012 to capture their personal interpretation of why Ohio agriculture is cool for their chance to win two tickets to see The Band Perry at the Ohio State Fair.

Entries, which can include an original video, photograph, drawing, or painting, will be judged in the following age categories. One winner from each age group and category will be chosen:

Grades K-2: Photography, Drawing or Painting
Grades 3-5: Video, Photography, Drawing or Painting
Grades 6-8: Video, Photography, Drawing or Painting
Grades 9-12: Video, Photography, Drawing or Painting

All entries will be reviewed by a panel of judges that may include representatives from the Ohio Department of Agriculture, the Office of the Governor, the Ohio Expo Center, and professionals in the areas of video production, photography, drawing, painting and other visual arts.… Continue reading

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What will be the impact of early wheat?

By Pierce Paul and Jorge David Salgado, Ohio State University Extension

On Friday April 27, wheat heads were observed in some fields in southern Ohio, about two weeks earlier than expected. Producers are asking whether such early development will likely have a negative effect on their crop. There is no easy answer to such a question; it all depends on the weather conditions over the next several weeks.

If cool weather occurs during most of the month of May, this will extend the grain fill period. Cool conditions will also reduce the development of foliar and head diseases such as Stagonospora and head scab, especially if it remains dry. Extended grain fill coupled with low disease severity will likely lead to higher grain yield and quality. However, wheat heading or flowering at the end of April or in early May is at greater risk for freezing injury. Two hours or more of exposure to 30o F could cause severe damage to wheat at the heading growth stage.… Continue reading

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Dream home turns into EPA nightmare

By Leisa Boley-Hellwarth, attorney in Mercer County

It was a beautiful March Sunday afternoon, with record high temperatures, a light breeze and sunshine. I had just sat down at my farm office computer, when I happened to glance out the window and looked again, before it registered. Holstein heifers were galloping down the driveway! Not one or two, but what appeared to be a barn full, all of breeding age. Maybe it was their idea of a spring fling. They were kicking their heels and racing around.  The rodeo began.

It was a little like the Supreme Court, some ran right and some ran left. So we started with the ones in the middle and gradually herded them all back into the heifer barn.

That same month, the Supreme Court Justices all headed in the same direction. They reached a unanimous decision in “Sackett v. Environmental Protection Agency” and sided with landowners who challenged an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) compliance order.… Continue reading

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Open house to showcase careers, advances in plant pathology and ag sciences

People interested in learning how to feed the world’s growing population can attend an open house on the subject at Ohio State University’s Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center on June 13, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

“Feeding the World in 2050: Career Opportunities for Future Scientists,” hosted by the department of Plant Pathology, will emphasize the wide array of degree programs and career opportunities in plant pathology and agricultural sciences, said Anne Dorrance, a plant pathologist with joint appointments with OSU Extension and OARDC.

Participants will have the chance to visit programs in bioinformatics, disease diagnostics, disease management, organic agriculture, urban farming and invasive species, as well as examine diseases of field crops, fruits, vegetables and ornamentals, she said.

A selection of laboratories, greenhouses and research plots will be open for visitors, including one of the largest disease-screening wheat nurseries in the northeastern U.S. featuring research in the genetics of breeding, biological control, host resistance to fungicides, epidemiological models and forecasting, inoculation techniques, and disease management strategies.… Continue reading

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Ethanol rocks video contest

 

As the E15 ethanol fuel blend prepares for its national debut, the National Corn Growers Association calls on students to channel their “inner Spielberg” and submit entries in the Ethanol Rocks video contest.

 

“Today, we’re distributing Ethanol Rocks video contest application and rules packets online and to FFA chapters and members of the National Science Teachers Association,” said Chad Willis, chairman of NCGA’s Ethanol Committee. “Statistics and studies confirm that ethanol keeps the cost of gasoline down and reduces harmful emissions into the environment, and we’re looking for creative ways to tell ethanol’s great story. By giving American youth a creative platform, we hope to discover a wide variety of interesting perspectives on the benefits of ethanol.”

 

The contest is looking for short videos (2 minutes or less) from active high school and college students that highlight the benefits of ethanol fuel blends to the U.S. environment and economy.… Continue reading

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Cool temperatures have slowed early corn

Cool temperatures and frost have slowed development of corn for farmers who planted earlier this year than ever before, a Purdue Extension corn specialist says.

“Probably the best way to describe the general condition of the crop to date is that it is behaving like a crop that was planted in late March and early April,” said Bob Nielsen. “Many of the surviving fields are light green to almost yellow. Almost all of the fields are developing slowly relative to calendar time but are on schedule relative to the more typical cool April temperatures and the resulting slow accumulation of growing-degree days.”

Growing-degree days are a measure of heat accumulation to predict plant development rates. It takes about 115 GDDs for corn to emerge. In a typical Indiana March, GDDs would be almost zero. But because of the unusually warm air temperatures and subsequent warm soil temperatures, the average daily accumulation of soil temperature-based GDDs was about 8-12 per day in the central part of the state, Nielsen said.… Continue reading

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Research shows N efficiency improving in corn

Today’s hybrid corn varieties more efficiently use nitrogen to create more grain, according to 72 years of public-sector research data reviewed by Purdue University researchers.

Tony Vyn, a professor of agronomy, and doctoral student Ignacio Ciampitti looked at nitrogen use studies for corn from two periods — 1940-1990 and 1991-2011. They wanted to see whether increased yields were due to better nitrogen efficiency or whether new plants were simply given additional nitrogen to produce more grain.

“Corn production often faces the criticism from society that yields are only going up because of an increased dependency on nitrogen,” said Vyn, whose findings were published in the early online version of the journal Field Crops Research. “Although modern hybrids take up more total nitrogen per acre during the growing season than they did before, the amount of grain produced per pound of nitrogen accumulated in corn plants is substantially greater than it was for corn hybrids of earlier decades.… Continue reading

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CME new hours plans delayed

Because CME Group Inc. (CME) has not yet officially notified the Commodity Futures Trading Commission  (CFTC) of its plan to expand its grain futures trading hours, the new hours announced this week will not be able to be implemented on May 14 as planned.

A “self-certification” form must be submitted to the CFTC by the CME disclosing its plans to change hours. Once submitted, the change in hours can’t take effect for 10 business days.

 

 … Continue reading

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Custom farming rates in Ohio

By Barry Ward, Leader, Production Business Management, Ohio State University Extension, Department of Agricultural, Environmental and Development Economics

A large number of Ohio farmers hire machinery operations and other farm related work to be completed by others. This is often due to lack of proper equipment, lack of time or lack of expertise for a particular operation.  Many farm business owners do not own equipment for every possible job that they may encounter in the course of operating a farm and may, instead of purchasing the equipment needed, seek out someone with the proper tools necessary to complete the job. This farm work completed by others is often referred to as “custom farm work” or more simply “custom work.” A “custom rate” is the amount agreed upon by both parties to be paid by the custom work customer to the custom work provider.

The custom rates reported in this publication are based on a statewide survey of 122 farmers, custom operators, farm managers and landowners conducted in 2012.… Continue reading

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