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Ohio's Crop Progress Report – October 24th

As of Sunday October 23rd, corn mature was rated at 76 percent, compared to 100 percent last year and 96 percent for the five-year average. Corn harvested for grain was 14 percent complete, compared to 75 percent last year and 41 percent for the five-year average. Corn silage was 88 percent harvested, compared to 100 percent for both last year and the five-year average. Ninety-five percent of soybeans were dropping leaves, compared to 100 percent for both last year and the five-year average. Eighty percent of soybeans were mature, compared to100 percent last year and 99 percent for the five-year average. Soybeans harvested were rated at 42 percent, 46 percentage points behind last year and 34 points behind the five-year average. Winter wheat was 55 percent planted, 34 percentage points behind last year and 27 points behind the five-year average. Emerged winter wheat was rated at seven percent, compared to 56 percent last year and 48 percent for the five-year average.… Continue reading

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Ohio’s Crop Progress Report – October 24th

As of Sunday October 23rd, corn mature was rated at 76 percent, compared to 100 percent last year and 96 percent for the five-year average. Corn harvested for grain was 14 percent complete, compared to 75 percent last year and 41 percent for the five-year average. Corn silage was 88 percent harvested, compared to 100 percent for both last year and the five-year average. Ninety-five percent of soybeans were dropping leaves, compared to 100 percent for both last year and the five-year average. Eighty percent of soybeans were mature, compared to100 percent last year and 99 percent for the five-year average. Soybeans harvested were rated at 42 percent, 46 percentage points behind last year and 34 points behind the five-year average. Winter wheat was 55 percent planted, 34 percentage points behind last year and 27 points behind the five-year average. Emerged winter wheat was rated at seven percent, compared to 56 percent last year and 48 percent for the five-year average.… Continue reading

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NPPC questions EPA need for reporting rule

While questioning the need for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s latest proposed Clean Water Act (CWA) reporting rule for large livestock operations, the National Pork Producers Council applauded the agency for at least acknowledging the concerns of livestock producers and for offering options to address them.

EPA’s proposed Concentrated Animal Feeding Operation (CAFO) Reporting Rule seeks to have CAFOs submit to the agency operational information so it “can more effectively carry out its CAFO permitting programs on a national level and ensure that CAFOs are implementing practices to protect water quality and human health.” The information includes basic facility facts, such as contact information, location of a CAFO’s production area, permit status, the number and type of animals confined and the number of acres available for land application of manure.

The agency is considering one of two reporting options: 1) require every CAFO to report information to EPA unless states with authorized CWA permitting programs choose to provide it on behalf of the CAFOs in their state; or 2) require CAFOs in “focus” watersheds that have water quality concerns associated with CAFOs to report information to EPA.… Continue reading

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AFBF offers its farm bill proposal

Stating that government agricultural support programs traditionally were intended to provide a safety-net to help farmers deal with “large systemic risk issues” rather than “smaller fluctuations in income” that can result from “average weather and market events,” the American Farm Bureau Federation sent a farm program proposal to Congress that is an alternative to earlier shallow-loss proposals.

A proposal to establish a “systemic risk reduction program” was approved by the AFBF Board of Directors as an alternative to “shallow loss” proposals that would provide government support after a region, or in some cases an individual farmer, faced some initial loss as little as 5 to 10 percent of expected revenue.  But shallow-loss programs were structured to support “only a relatively small portion of a producer’s potential loss, should a major problem occur,” according to AFBF President Bob Stallman.

“Our systemic risk reduction program would help protect America’s farmers from catastrophic type losses that truly would endanger the economic viability and the core of their farms,” Stallman said.… Continue reading

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Chinese role in markets

In September, the Chinese government began releasing corn from government reserves into the market and has reportedly released approximately 3.7 million metric tons (145.7 million bushels) to date. Releases were accomplished through normal sales channels rather than a public bid process.

According to the U.S. Grain Council, this may reflect an attempt to monitor sales volumes more tightly due to concerns regarding actual stock levels. Chinese market insiders also suggest China may restrict new crop corn procurement by the main buyers in Northeast China this year.

Industrial processing companies and possibly small feed mills and livestock farms are likely to be the first sectors affected, followed by large enterprises like COFCO and the China Grains & Logistics Corporation (CGLC). Finally, large grain enterprises could see restrictions on purchase volumes, and bank lending for some large buyers could be tightened.



Meanwhile, Zhang Xiaoqian, vice director of China’s National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC), said China is likely to use its huge foreign exchange reserves to buy staple commodities as needed.… Continue reading

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Ohio FFA members shine at National FFA Convention

The National FFA Association has an all time record membership announced at the National Convention in Indianapolis – 540,379 FFA members. Despite the increased competition from more FFA members from around the country than ever before, Ohio is holding its own in terms of national level competitors.

“One thing that the Ohio FFA is very excited about is that we have 14 national proficiency finalists this year, which is the most we’ve had in a long time,” said Leah Amstutz, the executive secretary of the Ohio FFA Association. “We also have the Ridgemont FFA chapter that did very well and we have several Chapters like the Fayetteville Chapter and the Versailles Chapter that will be recognized for being three star chapters in the national chapter award program.”

In addition, Ohio has a National Officer finalist with Amy Jo Frost and competitors in the National Ag Issues Forum and the speaking contest.… Continue reading

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Checking In from The National FFA Convention

Indianapolis is once again hosting The National FFA Convention. The Ohio Ag Net is there as the blue jackets invade Indy and we have had the opportunity to visit with many State Officers. We asked them about some of the highlights of this week’s festivities that put the Ohio FFA in the spotlight.

Benjamin Nething, Ohio FFA State Secretary

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Aaron Miller, Ohio FFA State Treasurer

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District 7 President Sierra Jepsen

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Leah Amstutz, Ohio FFA Executive Secretary

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Research on trees for biofuel production

Someday trees could provide more than just shade, scenery and building materials. Purdue University researchers are studying how poplars might be turned into liquid fuel.

In May a team of researchers led by Rick Meilan, associate professor of forestry and natural resources, began a five-year study to determine the viability of poplar species as an ethanol feedstock and cash crop for Indiana farmers. The study includes trial plots at Pinney-Purdue Agricultural Center east of Valparaiso and Southwest-Purdue Agricultural Center just north of Vincennes.

Findings from the research could help propel the fledgling cellulosic ethanol industry, Meilan said.

“For biofuel production we’re principally using the sugars in corn that are fermented to produce alcohol that’s then blended with petroleum products,” he said. “What we’d like to do is use cellulosic feedstocks, including not just corn stover but also wood chips.”

Cellulose is considered the next frontier in ethanol production. The process involves extracting sugars from the cell walls of plant material, or what is commonly known as biomass.… Continue reading

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Cutworm numbers on the rise

The number of adult moths of the western bean cutworm trapped by Ohio State University Extension professionals increased for the fifth straight year, but fortunately, larval infestations have yet to present an economic impact on Ohio farms.

“It’s definitely increasing, there’s no doubt about that,” said Extension entomologist Ron Hammond. “We caught about 1,000 more moths than we caught last year.”

Hammond said OSU researchers and Extension educators trap adult moths across the state in an effort to track the spread and growth of the cutworm population in Ohio.

Traps caught 3,751 moths this year, compared with 2,695 recorded in 2010. The northwestern and northeastern regions of the state saw the largest increases in trapped adults.

“We spend a lot of time searching for larval infestations,” Hammond said. “As with the previous years, we found very few egg masses, and very little larvae. The bottom line is we did not have the kind of populations we are expecting to see sooner or later.”… Continue reading

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Renewable Energy Workshop

Companies, farmers, and university and private researchers will converge in Wooster on Thursday, Nov. 10, to show the growth of Ohio’s renewable energy and products sector and explore new opportunities within this promising green industry. And they want you to be a part of it.

Registration is now open for the fourth annual Renewable Energy Workshop at Ohio State University’s OARDC. The event will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Fisher Auditorium, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster. Registration (including lunch and materials) costs $25 before Nov. 3 and $35 after that date.

The cost for college students is $10. To register, fill out the form available at http://go.osu.edu/GJ3 or contact Mary Wicks, 330-202-3533, wicks.14@osu.edu.



This year, the workshop will focus on the production of biogas through anaerobic digestion and the conversion of agricultural feedstocks and waste to industrial products, said Yebo Li, a biosystems engineer with OARDC and OSU Extension.
… Continue reading

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Report shows HSUS shares very little with animal shelters

HSUS’s advertisements employ the images of downtrodden dogs and cats to tug at the heart strings and wallets of America’s pet lovers. But the Center for Consumer Freedom’s new analysis finds HSUS is a “Humane Society” in name only, sharing a meager $527,566, or 0.4 percent of its $120 million budget with sheltering organizations nationwide in 2010. In the same year, HSUS spent an astounding $47 million in fundraising-related costs (37 percent of its total budget) and parked $32 million in hedge funds.

“Not Your Local Humane Society” includes an accounting of all grants to pet shelters made by HSUS during the years 2008, 2009, and 2010. The data is drawn directly from the animal rights group’s tax returns. The full report can be viewed here: http://www.humanewatch.org/images/uploads/NotYourLocalHumaneSociety_2011.pdf.

“The Humane Society of the United States would like Americans to believe it provides significant monetary support to local hands-on shelters, but their financial records tell an inconvenient truth,” said Rick Berman, CCF’s executive director.… Continue reading

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For the fifth year Certified Angus Beef reports record sales

Certified Angus Beef LLC, for the fifth consecutive year, reported record sales for its signature brand of beef, with nine out of 12 months in fiscal 2011 hitting new heights. Efforts by the brand’s licensed partners led to sales totaling 807 million pounds, an increase of almost 4% over 2010’s previous record 777 million pounds.

The Certified Angus Beef ® brand’s sustained growth, particularly during a period of significant economic downturns and rising costs across all segments of the industry, shows its value to consumers and producers, said company president John Stika.

“The brand’s growth represents a wave of momentum that took more than 30 years to build,” said Stika. The success, he added, is a function of both demand and supply of the high-quality Angus beef.

Increased demand is not only proven by sales success, but also documented by new research from Kansas State University that shows since 2002, demand for the Certified Angus Beef ® brand has risen 56%, while demand for commodity Choice beef rose 20%.… Continue reading

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Department heads agree on 4R concept for water quality

In a meeting along the shore of Lake Erie, officials from the Ohio departments of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and the Environmental Protection Agency announced ongoing efforts towards reducing agriculture-related phosphorus from loading into the western basin, and encouraged farmers to immediately adopt updated best management practices for fertilizer application.

Based on recommendations from a diverse working group that includes research scientists, agribusiness leaders, and environmentalists, the three agencies also agreed to encourage farmers to adopt production guidelines known as 4R Nutrient Stewardship that is effective in reducing soluble forms of phosphorus from impacting waterways across the state.

The 4R concept promotes using the right fertilizer source, at the right rate, at the right time, with the right placement. Recent studies indicate that the timing of fertilizer application, and how well it is incorporated into the soil layer, significantly reduces dissolved phosphorus runoff.

A U.S. Department of Agriculture report issued on Oct.… Continue reading

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“Meat MythCrushers” campaign expanded

The American Meat Institute (AMI), in conjunction with the American Meat Science Association (AMSA), expanded its “Meat MythCrushers” campaign with the first of seven new myth-crushing videos that sets the record straight about myths associated with the use of ammonium hydroxide in some beef products.

“We’ve received tremendous feedback thus far on the campaign,” said AMI Senior Vice President of Public Affairs and Member Services Janet Riley.  “We want to keep the momentum going and continue to provide consumers with facts to make informed choices.”

The Meat Myth Crushers campaign is centered around the website, http://www.meatmythcrushers.com/, and a companion Facebook page which feature science-based information and resources in response to some of the most popular meat and poultry myths held by consumers, covering topics such as food safety, production methods, nutrition and animal welfare.

“One of the more popular recent myths we’ve heard from consumers that has been spread by some movies and TV personalities is that ordinary household ammonia is used to make some hamburgers,” Riley added. … Continue reading

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EPA will not regulate farm dust

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa Jackson has confirmed that EPA will not regulate farm dust.  In a letter sent to Senator Debbie Stabenow, chairwoman of the Senate Ag Committee, Jackson wrote: “based on my consideration of the scientific record, analysis provided by EPA scientists and advice from the Clean Air Science Advisory Council, I am prepared to propose the retention – with no revision – of the current PM10 standard and form when it is sent to the White House for interagency review.”

Senator Debbie Stabenow, Chairwoman of the Senate Ag Committee, said, “we raised this issue of farm dust earlier in the year with the EPA Administrator and the Secretary of Agriculture, and I’m glad they listened to the serious concerns raised by the agriculture community about possible dust regulations.” Meanwhile, Senator Amy Klobuchar, a member of the Senate Ag Committee, points out that “dust is a fact of life in rural America, and imposing new dust regulations on farmers and rural communities would stifle the agriculture industry and hurt rural economies.”… Continue reading

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Ohio Crop Progress Report – October 17th

FIELD ACTIVITIES AND CROP PROGRESS WEEK ENDING SUNDAY OCTOBER 16th 2011

Fields are drying out from last week’s rain; producers are harvesting corn and soybean crops and planting winter wheat. Other field activities include manure application, light tillage, and mowing and baling hay. Producers in the West Central region report mold in corn and stock rot.

As of Sunday October 16th, corn mature was rated at 61 percent, compared to 99 percent last year and 90 percent for the five-year average. Corn harvested for grain was eight percent complete, compared to 62 percent last year and 29 percent for the five-year average. Corn silage was 81 percent harvested, compared to 100 percent for both last year and the five-year average. Ninety-one percent of soybeans were dropping leaves, compared to 100 percent for both last year and the five-year average. Sixty percent of soybeans were mature, compared to 97 percent last year and 94 percent for the five-year average.… Continue reading

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Ohio firm recalls beef and pork products

Fremont, Ohio-based E-Z Shop Kitchens, Inc., is recalling an undetermined amount of ready-to-eat, seasoned beef and shredded pork products because they were produced without the benefit of federal inspection, USDA announced.

The following products are subject to recall:

• 16-ounce and 4-pound tub containers of “E-Z SHOP KITCHEN SEASONED BEEF ” that bear the establishment number “EST. 19665” in the USDA mark of inspection.

• 16-ounce and 4-pound tub containers of “E-Z SHOP KITCHEN SHREDDED PORK WITH BBQ SAUCE ” that bear the establishment number “EST. 19665” in the USDA mark of inspection.

• 16-ounce and 4-pound tub containers of “E-Z SHOP KITCHEN SHREDDED BEEF WITH BBQ SAUCE ” that bear the establishment number “P-19665” in the USDA mark of inspection.

All of the products have unknown production dates and were distributed to retail and institutional customers in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio and West Virginia between July 1 and Oct. 6.… Continue reading

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Mourning the loss of Dr. Judy Sanders

Champaign County and Ohio agriculture is mourning the loss of Dr. Judy Sanders, the wife of noted veterinarian Don “Doc” Sanders. She passed away with Doc at her side on the morning of Oct. 15, 2011.

With her husband, she served as the Champaign County Fair veterinarian for 37 years where she not only treated sick livestock projects and counseled young exhibitors, but also was an avid supporter of 4-H and its ideals.

She was born Oct. 2, 1944 to Elmer and Hazel (Foor) Sauerbrei in Amanda, Ohio. She grew up on the family farm with an avid interest in animals. She graduated valedictorian of her class at Amanda-Clearcreek High School in 1962.

Judy met Don upon entry into veterinary college and married him four years later on March 17, 1968. After graduating from the College of Veterinary Medicine at The Ohio State University in 1968, the young couple started a practice at Urbana after graduation – a very unorthodox decision for the times.… Continue reading

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