Featured News



Waterfowl season is underway

Ohio hunters should have good opportunities to take some of the most popular species of waterfowl when the hunting season opens across much of the state Oct. 15, based on the findings of biologists at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The spring pond index for the prairie pothole region of North America (Kansas to central Saskatchewan) and breeding duck surveys indicate a better than average reproduction year for most duck species. Ponds are housing above-normal numbers, and good production has been noted from most of the primary breeding range.

Closer to home, the Upper Great Lakes states and eastern Canadian provinces showed good to excellent mallard nesting and brood rearing habitat conditions, and breeding populations similar to 2010. The Upper Great Lakes are the primary breeding range for mallards harvested in Ohio.

Mallards are Ohio’s most harvested duck and can be found throughout the state. Wood ducks, which are the second most harvested duck in Ohio and the state’s No.… Continue reading

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DOT clarification of farm CDL requirements

When it comes to the need for farmers to obtain a commercial driver’s license (CDL) to haul farm products or inputs, no news is good news, according to the Agricultural & Resource Law Program at Ohio State University.

“There haven’t been any changes,” said Peggy Kirk Hall, director of the Ag Law Program. “There were rumors there would be some additional federal changes to the CDL provisions, but the U.S. Department of Transportation announced there would be no changes, and provided some additional advice to clarify what was happening.”

The Ag & Resource Law Program is a research, outreach and education center supported by Ohio State University Extension. Find out more on the Web at http://aede.osu.edu/programs/aglaw

Hall said the message that there would be no changes in federal regulations regarding on-farm CDL requirements was an important one because there was significant confusion in the agricultural community over potential changes to regulations governing the CDL.… Continue reading

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Loan limit for the Guaranteed Loan Program increasing

Steven Maurer, State Executive Director for Ohio’s Farm Service Agency (FSA), announced that the loan limit for the Guaranteed Loan Program will increase to $1,214,000. The limit is adjusted annually based on the “Prices Paid to Farmers Index,” compiled by the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS).

“Raising the guaranteed loan limit will allow FSA to better meet the financial needs of producers across the state,” said Maurer.  Another change to the guaranteed loan program will affect the one-time loan guarantee fee charged on all FSA loans obligated after October 1, 2011.  The one-time loan guarantee fee will increase from 1.0 percent to 1.5 percent of the guaranteed portion of the loan.

FSA guaranteed loans allow lenders to provide agricultural credit to farmers who do not meet the lender’s normal underwriting criteria.  Farmers apply for a guaranteed loan through a commercial lender, and the lender arranges for the guarantee.  FSA can guarantee up to 95% of the loss of principal and interest on a loan. … Continue reading

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New Report Shows Conservation Practices Work

A new USDA study shows that farmers using combinations of erosion-control and nutrient-management practices on cultivated cropland are reducing losses of sediment, nitrogen and phosphorous from farm fields and decreasing the movement of these materials to the Great Lakes and their associated waterways.

“The Great Lakes Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) study confirms that good conservation planning and implementation have reduced loadings of sediment and nutrients to waterways throughout the region,” Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said today. “The Administration appreciates the actions of every farmer who is stepping up to implement conservation practices, protect vital farmlands and strengthen local economies. At the same time, we also see opportunities for even further progress.”

The CEAP study, prepared by USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), estimates that the use of conservation tillage and other conservation practices has resulted in a 50 percent decline in sediment entering rivers and streams, along with 36 and 37 percent declines, respectively, in phosphorus and nitrogen loading.… Continue reading

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Motorists, Farmers Urged to Use Caution

As Ohio farmers prepare for this fall’s crop harvest, Ohio Agriculture Director James Zehringer and Ohio State Highway Patrol Superintendent Colonel John Born are asking motorists and farmers to use caution when driving in October and November.

Motorists are encouraged to be aware of increased numbers of tractors and farm equipment likely to be seen on state roadways, and farmers likewise are encouraged to put safety as their top priority.

“Despite the wet weather we had throughout planting season this past spring, a substantial amount of corn and soybeans were able to be planted,” said Zehringer. “As farmers begin to harvest those crops, I encourage them to use safety precautions along roadways and to make sure their tractors are both highly visible and well lighted.”

Ohio State Highway Patrol Superintendent, Colonel John Born, cautions motorists to “be aware that more tractors and slow moving vehicles will be on the roadway over the next couple of months‐ use extra caution and be patient.”… Continue reading

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Fall weed control can prevent cutworm problems

By Ron Hammond and Andy Michel, Ohio State University Extension entomologists

We like to remind growers that fall weed control of winter annuals in corn is an excellent preventive management tactic for black cutworm the following spring.  By providing a weed-free seedbed in the spring, the likelihood of black cutworm problems in the spring will be lower.  Adult moths migrate from the south each spring and lay their eggs on weeds, with chickweed perhaps the most well-known host for eggs.  Black cutworm caterpillars then move to corn when weeds are killed.  Thus, a fall herbicide application not only rids the field of the weeds, but also removes potential sites for egg laying.  When considering the benefits of a fall herbicide application, do not forget the added benefit of black cutworm management.… Continue reading

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Feed challenges continue to plague dairy farms

In a crop year full of uncooperative weather, dairy producers across the region are struggling with feed problems and rising prices, a Purdue Extension dairy specialist said.

Forages, corn silage and corn grain are low in yields and quality, but high in price after a wet spring followed by a summer-long drought, said Mike Schutz. The combination is tough on animal health and on the bottom lines of dairy farms struggling to stay profitable.

“Because of the drought, corn and forage yields are down and silage is lower quality, but the costs remain high,” Schutz said. “The per-ton value of silage is based on yields and corn prices. With corn trading above $6.50 per bushel, delivered silage prices are about $65 to $75 per ton despite the frequent lower quality. This is in comparison with the $30 to $40 per ton prices producers were paying in recent years.”

Purdue Extension dairy specialist Tamilee Nennich said the fluctuating corn prices can make it difficult to determine fair prices for corn silage.… Continue reading

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USDA Lowers Projections for 2011 Crops

The U.S. corn and soybean crops are both slightly smaller than earlier expected, according to Wednesday’s monthly USDA Crop Production report.

Corn is forecast at 12.4 billion bushels, down 1% from last month’s estimate and slightly off 2010’s production. Soybeans are seen at 3.06 billion bushels, also down 1% from last month’s guess and 8% lower than a year ago.

In Ohio, corn is projected at 495.880 million bushels, compared to 2010’s 533.01 million. Average yield = 154 bushels per acre, which was 153 a month ago and 163 a year ago.

Beans in Ohio projected at 208.84 million bushels, compared to 220.32 last year. 46 bushels per acre average yield which equals last month and is close to the 48 bushels per acre last year.

Mike Zuzolo from Global Commodity Analytics goes over the National numbers with Ty Higgins and how they may impact the markets Wednesday.

Zues 10.12.11.mp3Continue reading

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Most new livestock standards are commonsense practices

 

Now that Ohio’s livestock care standards, as developed by the Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board, are officially signed into law, what exactly does that mean on a daily basis for Ohio’s livestock producers? Aside from the well-publicized housing standards and related transition periods, and adjustments some people building new facilities will have to make, the standards change very little in terms of daily care for livestock and poultry.

“Most of the rest of the standards for swine are good management practices we expect our producers to follow anyway,” said Dick Isler, executive vice president of the Ohio Pork Producers Council. “They’re basically just good, standard management practices.”

That sentiment is echoed by the leaders of all of Ohio’s livestock commodity groups.

“A lot of these standards are what beef producers have been doing for a long time with quality, everyday care of their animals,” said Elizabeth Harsh, executive director of the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association (OCA).… Continue reading

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Ohio's Crop Progress Report – October 11th

FIELD ACTIVITIES AND CROP PROGRESS WEEK ENDING SUNDAY OCTOBER 9th 2011

Fields are drying out from last week’s rain; producers are harvesting corn and soybean crops and planting winter wheat. Other field activities include manure application, light tillage, and mowing and baling hay.

As of Sunday October 9th, corn dented was 95 percent, compared to 100 percent for both last year and the five-year average. Corn mature was rated at 39 percent, compared to 94 percent last year and 83 percent for the five-year average. Corn harvested for grain was five percent complete, compared to 45 percent last year and 20 percent for the five-year average. Corn silage was 70 percent harvested, compared to 100 percent last year and 96 for the five-year average. Eighty percent of soybeans were dropping leaves, compared to 97 percent for both last year and the five-year average. Thirty-one percent of soybeans were mature, compared to 88 percent last year and 81 percent for the five-year average.… Continue reading

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Ohio’s Crop Progress Report – October 11th

FIELD ACTIVITIES AND CROP PROGRESS WEEK ENDING SUNDAY OCTOBER 9th 2011

Fields are drying out from last week’s rain; producers are harvesting corn and soybean crops and planting winter wheat. Other field activities include manure application, light tillage, and mowing and baling hay.

As of Sunday October 9th, corn dented was 95 percent, compared to 100 percent for both last year and the five-year average. Corn mature was rated at 39 percent, compared to 94 percent last year and 83 percent for the five-year average. Corn harvested for grain was five percent complete, compared to 45 percent last year and 20 percent for the five-year average. Corn silage was 70 percent harvested, compared to 100 percent last year and 96 for the five-year average. Eighty percent of soybeans were dropping leaves, compared to 97 percent for both last year and the five-year average. Thirty-one percent of soybeans were mature, compared to 88 percent last year and 81 percent for the five-year average.… Continue reading

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National Emerald Ash Borer Research Conference in Wooster Oct. 12-13

U.S. and Canadian scientists will gather in Wooster on Oct. 12 and 13 to share the latest research on emerald ash borer (EAB), a destructive insect responsible for killing millions of ash trees in urban settings and forests from Minnesota to Quebec, from Michigan to Tennessee.



The Emerald Ash Borer Research and Technology Development Meeting will be held for the first time on the campus of the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC), 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster. Previous meetings took place in Pittsburgh; Cincinnati; and Port Huron and Romulus, Mich.



“This conference will bring together scientists from research institutions, government agencies and corporations from throughout the United States and Canada to present and discuss the state-of-the-art emerald ash borer research and technology, focused on understanding the biology and management of this devastating invasive pest,” said Dan Herms, Ohio State University entomologist, conference organizer and a leading EAB researcher.

Research topics featured at the conference include biological control, insecticide trials, development of resistant hybrid ash trees, traps, management of infestations, ecological impacts of ash tree losses and mapping of ash trees in public areas.

… Continue reading

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Ag Law Symposium next month

From shale gas legal issues to enforcing the state’s new Livestock Care Standards to federal and state agricultural legislation, the Nov. 18 Ohio Agricultural Law Symposium is packed with hot topics in the legal community.

Organizer Peggy Hall, director of Ohio State University Extension’s Agricultural and Resource Law Program, said the fourth annual program could well be the best one yet.

The symposium, at the Ohio Union at 1739 N. High St., runs from 9 a.m. to 4:15 p.m., with registration beginning at 8:30 a.m. Pre-registration, available at http://www.ohiobar.org, is $260 for Ohio State Bar Association members or $325 for non-members, with six Continuing Legal Education credits. Non-CLE rates are available; call the Bar Association at 800-232-2174. Also, student scholarships are available through Ohio State’s Paul L. Wright Chair Fund in Agricultural Law; for information, contact Hall at 614-247-7898 or aglaw@osu.edu.

Sessions include:

Chesapeake TMDL: EPA’s New Framework for Watershed Regulation, Danielle Quist, Senior Counsel for Public Policy, American Farm Bureau Federation, Washington, D.C.… Continue reading

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Yield Reports from Across Ohio

Soybeans

County: Union
Yield: 60
Moisture: 14%
Variety: Asgrow 3431s

County: Crawford
Yield:62
Moisture: 11%

County: Darke
Yield: in the 50’s
Moisture: 10%

County: Wayne
Yield: 62-77
Moisture: 13%-17%

Corn

County: Marion
Yield: 260/dry
Moisture: 22%
Hybrid: Agri Gold 6533VT3

 

County: Muskingum
Yield: 275
Moisture: 24%
Hybrid: Monsanto DKC 61-21

County: Crawford
Yield: 217
Hybrid: AgriGold A6389VT3   

County: Clark
Yield: 155
Moisture: 22
Hybrid: Agri Gold 6533 vt3

County: Delaware
Yield: 256
Moisture: 15%

County: Delaware
Yield: 220
Moisture: 22%

County: Wayne
Yield: 201-251
Moisture: 21%-27%

 

 

 

 

 

 

I also received a report yesterday of Asgrow 3431s averaging 60 bu/acre with moisture of 14% in Raymond(Union County)… Continue reading

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Ear rots to watch for

By Dave Nanda, Director of Genetics and Technology
Seed Consultants, Inc.

There was quite a bit of corn in Ohio and Indiana, especially, south of I-70, that was planted late this year. This was followed by excessive rain in the spring and then heat and drought subjected the crops to more stress. Then, to add insult to injury, it became cold and started to rain in late September when it was of little value to this year’s crops. These conditions have been very conducive to the development of ear rots. I have seen three major diseases that cause ear rots in corn. You can diagnose these by the color of the fungus.

• Diplodia ear rot is the most prevalent disease I have seen this year. It is whitish gray in color and usually starts at the base of the ears and can spread to the whole ear. Infected kernels are light in test weight and not known to produce any toxins

• Gibberella ear rot is produced by a pink colored fungus that generally starts at the tips of the ears.… Continue reading

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Ohioans do well at World Dairy Expo

Two cows from Ohio farms took top honors at the World Dairy Expo in Madison, Wisconsin held Novemeber 4-8 2011.

Tanner Topp of Wooster exhibited the Grand Champion in the International Aryshire Jr. Show with Conebella Sarge’s Wendy.

David Riley of Williamsfield exhibited Mi-San Acres O Lust-ET  that won the Internatonal Jr. Milking Shorthorn Show.… Continue reading

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NLCB showing up again in the corn crop

The continued incidence of Northern Corn Leaf Blight in Ohio fields is increasingly concerning to plant pathologists at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center.

“In the past, we’ve seen leaf blight show up and not cause much of a problem,” said Ohio State University Extension plant pathologist Pierce Paul. “Every single year since 2001 it has shown up in some form or another, which concerns me now because the levels are increasing, and it’s showing up in more fields every year.”

Paul said the continued and increasing incidence of the disease indicates farmers are still planting corn varieties susceptible to leaf blight. He recommended farmers take stock of fields and varieties that are affected by blight this year, and plant resistant varieties in those fields next year.

He said by continuing to plant susceptible varieties, farmers are in essence ignoring the problem, and allowing the disease to further stress plants in the future.… Continue reading

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Canal expansion could improve competitiveness

An extensive study coordinated by the United Soybean Board’s (USB) Global Opportunities (GO) program expects a new, larger shipping lane through the Panama Canal to double the area that draws U.S. soy to Mississippi River destinations eventually destined for export through Gulf of Mexico ports.



The soybean checkoff-funded study, conducted by Memphis, Tenn.-based Informa Economics, says the expansion of the Panama Canal, expected to be completed in 2014, “…will eventually alter trade lanes” in the United States and other countries. The in-depth examination, recommended by the checkoff-funded Soy Transportation Coalition (STC), claims a new, larger shipping lane for the nearly 100 year old short-cut between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans will:

• Expand the average area that draws U.S. soy and grain to the Mississippi River for barge transit to central Gulf of Mexico ports from 70 miles to over 150 miles


• Increase the total volume of U.S. soybeans and grain moving through the Panama Canal to export markets by 30 percent

• Result in an approximate 35 cents per bushel savings for elevators within the range of central Gulf of Mexico ports, assuming the ports will dredge to ensure at least a depth of 45 feet to handle larger ships capable of moving through the expanded Panama Canal.

… Continue reading

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USDA Grant helps Ohio counties impacted by DHL departure

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced funding awards that will support rural communities, help create jobs and build regional economies in 34 states, including Ohio. Vilsack made the announcement during the Rural Wealth Creation and Livelihoods Conference, sponsored by the USDA Economic Research Service and the Ford Foundation.



“The funds I am announcing will help local business leaders, communities, and disadvantaged agricultural producers take more of a collaborative and regional approach toward jobs creation, business development and economic growth,” said Vilsack.


Among the awards is a $48,500 Rural Business Opportunity Grant for “Energize Clinton County,” a Wilmington initiative that provides marketing and business development support for smaller retail, restaurant and agricultural businesses.



“We are very excited about this USDA grant!” said Energize Clinton County Co-Director Mark Rembert. “We’ve been extremely hard hit by the recession here, losing about 10,000 jobs since DHL Express left the Wilmington Air Park in 2009.”



Rembert said the funds will help create a technical training center that will serve communities in a seven county rural region in southwest and south central Ohio, including Clinton, Fayette, Highland, Adams, Ross, Pike and Scioto counties.… Continue reading

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