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Consumers say U.S. farmers not responsible for feeding the world

A new study indicates that a large segment of consumers do not believe U.S. farmers should be responsible for addressing global hunger. In its latest analysis of consumer trust in the food system, the Center for Food Integrity (CFI) found that 40% of those surveyed strongly disagreed that, “the United States has a responsibility to provide food for the rest of the world.”

The study also shows that more than half the survey participants strongly agreed with the statement, “It is more important for the U.S. to teach developing nations how to feed themselves than to export food to them.”

“These results clearly indicate that consumers do not believe U.S. farmers should be responsible for feeding the world.  Agriculture needs to find messages that deliver a direct benefit to consumers or society to build support for today’s farming practices,” said Charlie Arnot, CEO of CFI. “If consumers don’t believe U.S agriculture has a responsibility to feed the world then we can’t build consumer support for today’s farming simply by claiming we need to feed more people, unless we can build public support that feeding the world should be a priority.”… Continue reading

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Livestock industry voices concerns with corn supply

The House Committee on Agriculture’s Subcommittee on Livestock, Dairy and Poultry heard firsthand the challenges the livestock and poultry industries face today and expect to face in the coming years because of tight feed grain supplies. The hearing came on the heels of a U.S. Department of Agriculture World Agriculture Supply and Demand Estimates report that projected this year’s corn crop will be 417 million bushels lower than initial estimates.

Tight corn supplies have pushed prices to nearly $7.50 a bushel and prompted concerns about possible feed grain shortages.

Representatives from the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, National Pork Producers Council, National Turkey Federation, National Chicken Council and the American Feed Industry Association, who testified before the subcommittee, issued the following statements subsequent to the hearing:

“While U.S. corn usage for food and industrial purposes other than ethanol have remained relatively constant since 2008, the amount of corn used for ethanol has increased eight-fold, with three-quarters of that increase occurring since 2005,” said Steve Meyer on behalf of NCBA.… Continue reading

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OSA supports HB 276

The Ohio Soybean Association (OSA) applauded State Representatives Jim Buchy (R-Greenville) and Lou Gentile (D-Steubenville) today for providing sponsor testimony in the Ohio House Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee for House Bill 276 (H.B. 276). H.B. 276 will eliminate confusion in the interpretation of zoning laws with regards to agriculture and create more value-added opportunities for Ohio’s farm families.

“OSA strongly supports H.B. 276 and thanks Representatives Buchy and Gentile for their support in creating economic development in rural Ohio,” said Jeff Wuebker, OSA chairman. Wuebker operates a diversified grain and livestock farm in Versailles, OH.

H.B. 276 clarifies agricultural zoning laws with regards to operations secondary to production agriculture. For example, the recent Ohio Supreme Court case, Terry v. Sperry highlights how different jurisdictions’ interpretation of Ohio’s zoning and taxation laws could cripple rural economic growth. In this case, grape farmers installed a winery that was considered secondary to the production of grapes.… Continue reading

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Survey to audit Ohioans’ 2012 Farm Bill perceptions at FSR

To better understand Ohioans’ attitudes and beliefs about the pending 2012 Farm Bill, the Ohio Corn & Wheat Growers Association (OCWGA) is hosting a survey and awarding two random participants with iPads at the annual Farm Science Review (FSR) September 20, 21 and 22 in London, Ohio.

“FSR will help us gauge what our farmers and consumers understand and don’t understand about current agriculture policies,” said Dwayne Siekman, OCWGA CEO. “We’ll assess the results to address the issues of the pending 2012 Farm Bill.”

The Farm Bill, initiated in the Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1933, was passed during the Great Depression and undergoes review and reauthorization about every five years. Its policies support commodity crops, horticulture and livestock, conservation, nutrition, trade and food aid, agricultural research, farm-credit, rural development, energy, forestry and other related programs. It guides most federal farm and food policies.

OCWGA is active at the state and federal level to advocate for globally competitive, market-responsive and environmentally responsible policies that protect food security, sustainable farming and the financial wellness of farmers simultaneously.… Continue reading

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Study finds more effective way to dry ethanol, reduce costs

Purdue University researchers have found an alternative environmentally friendly and energy-efficient way to dry corn ethanol, and their proof is in the pudding.

Michael Ladisch, a distinguished professor of agricultural and biological engineering; Youngmi Kim, a Purdue research scientist; and Ahmad Hilaly, director of process research at Archer Daniels Midland, found that the shape and structure of tapioca pearls are ideal for removing water from ethanol. Their findings were reported in the July issue of the journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research.

After fermentation, ethanol contains between 6% and 12% water, which must be removed to make it fuel-grade. Many ethanol plants use corn grits, which absorb water, or molecular sieves, silica-based particles with tiny pores that only retain water molecules. Ladisch and Kim found that tapioca pearls work better than the conventional corn grit adsorbents.

“Any starch will absorb water. That’s how you cook rice or pasta,” Kim said.… Continue reading

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Small farm college in Northeast Ohio

There is a growing trend in Ohio Agriculture toward the direct marketing of agricultural products featuring locally grown food products. Consumers are becoming more and more aware of the benefits of buying local and buying fresh. As the demand for local food products increases so does the interest in growing and producing a variety of agricultural products for these markets. Perhaps this is something that you have considered for your small acreage but do not know where to begin.

To help land owners decide what to grow or raise on their excess acreage, the Ohio State University Extension offices in the Western Reserve Extension Education and Research Area are pleased to announce the Northeast Ohio New & Small Farm College titled “Too Much to Mow-What Do I Grow?” will be held on Monday evenings September 26 and October 3, 10, & 17, 2011 from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m. in Madison (Lake County) Ohio.… Continue reading

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USDA steps up food safety efforts

The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced that it is taking new steps to fight E. coli and protect the safety of the American food supply. Six additional serogroups of pathogenic E. coli will be declared adulterants in non-intact raw beef. Raw ground beef, its components, and tenderized steaks found to contain these bacteria will be prohibited from sale to consumers. USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) will launch a testing program to detect these dangerous pathogens and prevent them from reaching consumers.

As a result of this action, if the E. coli serogroups O26, O103, O45, O111, O121 and O145 are found in raw ground beef or its precursors, those products will be prohibited from entering commerce. Like E.coli O157:H7, these serogroups can cause severe illness and even death, and young children and the elderly are at highest risk. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identifies these particular serogroups of non-O157:H7 Shiga-toxin producing E.coli,… Continue reading

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New legislation addresses dust regulations

New legislation introduced by Sen. Mike Johanns (R-Neb.) that would prevent the Environmental Protection Agency from regulating naturally occurring farm dust is welcome news for the nation’s farmers and ranchers, according to the American Farm Bureau Federation.

“Regulation of farm dust by EPA could severely hamper the ability of farmers and ranchers to meet the world’s food needs,” said AFBF President Bob Stallman.

EPA is reviewing existing regulations for particulate matter, which includes soot and dust. Soot is generated by car emissions and factories; dust occurs naturally.

According to Stallman, planting and harvesting crops, livestock moving from place to place and people driving down dirt roads are just a few of the ways dust occurs naturally on farms and in rural areas.

“The current rules pertaining to dust are adequate,” Stallman said. “Increased regulation of farm dust could result in decreased productivity and higher food prices, coupled with lost jobs in the rural economy.… Continue reading

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Farm Science Review starts in a week

The 2011 Farm Science Review starts in less than one week. The picture below was taken from the Southeast corner of the New Holland lot looking up past Case IH and John Deere. Over the next few days these displays and many others will come to life highlighting what is new in Ohio’s agriculture.

The Farm Science Review opens at 8:00 am Tuesday September 20th and runs through 4:00 pm on Thursday the 22nd. Make sure you stop by the Ohio’s Country Journal and Ohio Ag Net Barn to say hello.

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No-till wheat burndown tips

By Mark Loux, Ohio State University Extension herbicide specialist

Herbicide options for burndown of existing weeds prior to planting of no-till wheat include glyphosate, Ignite, Gramoxone, Sharpen, and dicamba.  Dicamba labels have the following restriction on preplant applications – “Allow 10 days between application and planting for each 0.25 lb ai/A used”.

A rate of 0.5 lb ai/A would therefore need to be applied at least 20 days before planting.  We have, as usual, been receiving questions about the safety and legality of 2,4-D use prior to wheat planting.  We do not know of any 2,4-D product label that supports this use of 2,4-D.  There is some risk of stand reduction and injury to wheat from preplant applications of 2,4-D.

The primary targets for a preplant burndown in wheat are the small, emerged winter annual weeds that can overwinter and have a negative effect on wheat the following spring.  This includes marestail (horseweed), chickweed, deadnettle, annual bluegrass, mustards, etc. … Continue reading

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Bean leaf beetles feeding on pods

By Ron Hammond, Ohio State University Extension pathologist

With soybeans reaching the R6 growth stage, full seed, the primary insect we still need to concern ourselves with is the adult bean leaf beetle. This true second generation (although the third group of adults observed this season) is the group that will overwinter to become active again in 2012. Prior to that happening, these insects will feed on the most tender part of the plant, that being the pods. In fields where the pods have started turning yellow and brown, the pod feeding is stopping and the adults will be leaving in search of “greener pastures”. However, they will enter other fields that are still green, where they have the potential to cause significant injury. Growers should maintain a watch on those fields to prevent pod feeding from reaching high levels. Treatment is usually indicated when pod feeding reaches 10-15% and beetles are still present and actively feeding.… Continue reading

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Time to re-negotiate cash rental rates

By Chris Bruynis, Ohio State University Assistant Professor & Extension Educator

With the late planting this spring, farmers will be harvesting somewhat later than normal this fall. The late harvest will challenge farmers to get wheat planted on time and crops harvested before winter weather arrives. Many times farm rental arrangements are discussed following harvest, but this year farmers and landowners may want to get this completed before harvest begins. This will allow both parties the necessary time needed to arrange a rental agreement beneficial to both parties.

One of the more common questions asked of Extension Educators is what is an appropriate cash rent? Establishing an appropriate cash rental rate for a farm is difficult and is often influenced by several factors. While it is likely that each situation will have some features that make it unique, Craig Dobbins, Department of Agricultural Economics, Purdue University states the following items in this list are common considerations for many situations.… Continue reading

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Ohio’s Crop Progress Report – September 12th

OHIO CROP WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS

WEEK ENDING SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 11th 2011

The average temperature for the State was 63.9 degrees, 3.7 degrees below normal for the week ending Sunday, September 11, 2011. Precipitation averaged 1.75 inches, 1.23 inches above normal. There were 100 modified growing degree days, 26 days below normal. Reporters rated 2.3 days suitable for fieldwork during the seven-day period ending Friday, September 9, 2011. Topsoil moisture was rated 0 percent very short, 10 percent short, 69 percent adequate, and 21 percent surplus.

FIELD ACTIVITIES AND CROP PROGRESS

Rains this week helped to revive crops, but prevented some field work. Those able to get into fields tilled wheat stubble, planted cover crops, hauled manure, and began corn harvest for silage.

As of Sunday September 11th, corn in dough was 93 percent, which was seven percent behind 2010 and three percent behind the five-year average. Corn dented was 56 percent, compared to 89 percent last year and 79 percent for the five-year average.… Continue reading

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Ohio's Crop Progress Report – September 12th

OHIO CROP WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS

WEEK ENDING SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 11th 2011

The average temperature for the State was 63.9 degrees, 3.7 degrees below normal for the week ending Sunday, September 11, 2011. Precipitation averaged 1.75 inches, 1.23 inches above normal. There were 100 modified growing degree days, 26 days below normal. Reporters rated 2.3 days suitable for fieldwork during the seven-day period ending Friday, September 9, 2011. Topsoil moisture was rated 0 percent very short, 10 percent short, 69 percent adequate, and 21 percent surplus.

FIELD ACTIVITIES AND CROP PROGRESS

Rains this week helped to revive crops, but prevented some field work. Those able to get into fields tilled wheat stubble, planted cover crops, hauled manure, and began corn harvest for silage.

As of Sunday September 11th, corn in dough was 93 percent, which was seven percent behind 2010 and three percent behind the five-year average. Corn dented was 56 percent, compared to 89 percent last year and 79 percent for the five-year average.… Continue reading

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OARDC to open a new agrosecurity research facility

Ohio State University’s Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) will unveil Sept. 16 a unique, highly secure bio-containment building aimed at enhancing its nationally and internationally recognized research programs on infectious diseases of plants and animals — and further safeguarding Ohio’s $90-plus billion agricultural industry.



The $22.2 million Plant and Animal Agrosecurity Research (PAAR) Facility will enable scientists on the Wooster campus to work with infectious agents classified by federal standards at the BSL-3 (biosafety level 3) and BSL-3 Agriculture safety levels. PAAR will be the first facility in Ohio and one of only two nationally with capacity for both plant and animal research at such safety levels.



“PAAR is a unique facility that will allow Ohio State to proactively address plant and animal pests that threaten our food and green industries in Ohio,” OARDC Director Steve Slack said. “We will now be able to initiate research to provide solutions on new and emerging problems before they cause significant losses, and will be able to attract the resources necessary to develop these solutions.”

… Continue reading

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Question the Authorities at FSR

Experts from Ohio State University’s Department of Agricultural, Environmental and Development Economics will present a series of updates on the agricultural economy, commodity markets and policy issues at the 2011 Farm Science Review, Sept. 20-22 at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center near London.

“Our ‘Question the Authorities’ sessions focus on the current economy and its effect on agriculture, broadly defined,” said Stan Ernst, OSU Extensionoutreach program leader. “We have a little extra this year related to energy and we’ll do some presentations on alternative enterprise examples, also.”

The Question the Authorities sessions are a staple of Extension’s educational offerings at Farm Science Review. Sessions run daily beginning at 9 a.m. at 426 Friday Ave. as part of OSU Central.

For corn, wheat and soybean producers, the Department’s popular grain marketing outlook presentations are offered three times each day of the Review. The program also features sessions on input costs, farmland values and cash rents, as well as sessions on estate planning and farm transfer issues.… Continue reading

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Bob Evans pledges $10,000 to Animals for Life Foundation

Bob Evans Farms has pledged $10,000 to the Animals for Life Foundation, a 501(c)3 charitable organization working to educate the public about the value animals bring to human life and the care people give their animals.

“Animals are an important part of our lives in many ways, for many reasons, for many purposes,” said Mike Townsley, President of Bob Evans’ Food Products Division. “We support a common sense discussion on the human-animal bond where animals receive quality care regardless of their ultimate purpose.”

The Animals for Life Foundation was founded in 2009, and in its first two years, it has supported programs including two therapy dog programs: one for elementary school children and one for children with autism, a farm animal handling program for first responders, a Season’s Harvest event in Medina County that benefits the local animal shelter and an animal behavior, welfare and husbandry career event sponsored by Ohio FFA.… Continue reading

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Obama’s American Jobs Act

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack visited The Ohio State University to highlight President Obama’s speech on the American Jobs Act and what it means to Ohioans. Secretary Vilsack met with leaders from The Ohio State University and from the local business community to discuss the Administration’s strategy to strengthen the U.S. economy.

Specifically, the American Jobs Act:

• Cuts the payroll tax in half to 3.1% for employers on the first $5 million in wages, providing broad tax relief to all businesses but targeting it to the 98 percent of firms with wages below this level. In Ohio, 200,000 firms will receive a payroll tax cut under the American Jobs Act.

 

• Includes $50 billion in immediate investments for highways, transit, rail and aviation, helping to modernize an infrastructure that now receives a grade of “D” from the American Society of Civil Engineers and putting hundreds of thousands of construction workers back on the job.… Continue reading

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Obama's American Jobs Act

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack visited The Ohio State University to highlight President Obama’s speech on the American Jobs Act and what it means to Ohioans. Secretary Vilsack met with leaders from The Ohio State University and from the local business community to discuss the Administration’s strategy to strengthen the U.S. economy.

Specifically, the American Jobs Act:

• Cuts the payroll tax in half to 3.1% for employers on the first $5 million in wages, providing broad tax relief to all businesses but targeting it to the 98 percent of firms with wages below this level. In Ohio, 200,000 firms will receive a payroll tax cut under the American Jobs Act.

 

• Includes $50 billion in immediate investments for highways, transit, rail and aviation, helping to modernize an infrastructure that now receives a grade of “D” from the American Society of Civil Engineers and putting hundreds of thousands of construction workers back on the job.… Continue reading

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VIDEO – Ag Secretary Vilsack Visits Ohio State

Friday, Ag Secretary Tom Vilsack met with leaders from The Ohio State University and from the local business community whose research is producing biobased products and creating new job opportunities. In January, the USDA Certified Biobased Product label was launched so customers know when they are buying a biobased product, thereby creating economic opportunity for businesses producing these products. The label identifies biobased products composed wholly or significantly of agricultural ingredients-renewable plant, animal, marine or forestry materials. Biobased products help add value to commodities, create jobs in rural communities, and increase U.S. energy independence by reducing the use of petroleum in manufactured products.

 … Continue reading

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