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Former Bob Evans Inc. CEO Dies

Dan Evans, the former Bob Evans Inc. CEO who worked at the company for half a century and is credited with much of the chain’s growth, died at age 74 on Christmas Eve.

The Columbus-based company said Evans died at Riverside Methodist Hospital on Christmas Eve. Evans started at Bob Evans in a Xenia, Ohio, sausage production plant in 1956 and became chairman and CEO in 1971. He succeeded his father, Emerson Evans, the company’s founding leader. Dan Evans is the cousin of the company’s namesake, who died in 2007.

Evans retired as CEO in 2000 and chairman the following year before retiring from the board in 2006. In his three decades leading the company, Evans helped expand the restaurant chain’s nationwide footprint and its sausage-making operation, bringing Bob Evans past the $1 billion annual sales mark. The company recorded $1.73 billion in revenue in the year ended April 30.

CEO Steve Davis in a statement said Evans “leaves a tremendous legacy, which we are honored to continue each day.”… Continue reading

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Ethanol, racing and the NASCAR nap

By Matt Reese

February and the start of the NASCAR season are just around the corner. This occasion has taken on an important place in the life of one of my co-workers in recent years.
She was never a big NASCAR fan, but after she married a diehard follower of the sport several years ago, she had to make some life changes. To deal with this potential source of marital strife, she called one of her friends in a similar situation to determine the best way to acclimate to her new life of NASCAR. That is when she learned the secret of the NASCAR nap.
Apparently, most of the drama, excitement and spectacle of NASCAR can be enjoyed in the first half hour and the final hour of the event. Hence, devoted wives of NASCAR fans can take a roughly two-hour Sunday afternoon nap during the middle of the race and still be able to hold competent discussions with their husbands about the event.… Continue reading

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Ohio hog inventory up 1%

Ohio hog producers had 2,030,000 hogs on hand December 1, 2010, was up 1% from a year earlier, but down 1% from last quarter. The number of market hogs, at 1,860,000 head, was up 1% from last year but down 1% from last quarter. Breeding stock, at 170,000 head, was up 3% from last year and last quarter.

The September-November pig crop numbered 837,000 head, which was up 2% from last year but down 3% from last quarter. The number of sows farrowed during the September-November 2010 quarter at 89,000 was 1,000 head below last quarter but 2,000 head above last year. Pigs saved per litter during the September-November 2010 quarter averaged 9.4 and was unchanged from the same period last year but down 2% from last quarter.

Ohio producers intend to farrow 86,000 sows during the December-February 2011 quarter; down 3% from a year earlier. Farrowing intentions for the spring quarter, March-May 2011, is 87,000; down 2 percent from the same quarter of 2010.… Continue reading

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SCN research

By Dennis Mills, Glen Arnold, Roger Bender, Mike Estadt, Mark Koenig, Anne Dorrance, Bridget Meiring, Kate Gearhart, Dave Mangione, Ohio State University Extension

As part of a multi-state, 3-year North Central Soybean Research Program project, we have compared the changes in SCN populations under varieties which are susceptible or have resistance derived from PI 88788, Peking, or PI437654 (CystX).  Management of soybean cyst nematode consists primarily of crop rotation both with non-hosts and with different sources of resistance (if they are available).

Best SCN Management Strategies for Ohio Soybean Producers
Egg counts/200 cc of soilCyst CountPopulation LevelManagement Strategies
0-400None detectedContinue to monitor field after two crops of soybean
40-2001TraceBegin to measure some yield loss in Susceptible varieties at or above 200 eggs/200cc
200-20001-4LowPlant SCN resistant variety or rotate to a non-host crop.  At or above 2000 eggs some yield loss may occur on SCN resistant varieties
2000-50003-20ModerateRotate to a non-host crop next year and return with SCN resistant soybeans the following year.
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West Ohio Agronomy Day-January 10th


The January 10, 2011 West Ohio Agronomy Day has daytime and evening sessions for the convenience of farmers, agricultural businesses and crop consultants. St. Michael’s Hall in Ft. Loramie, Ohio is the location of this event, designed to offer a comprehensive crop production agenda while providing private and commercial pesticide re-certification credits as well as CEU’s for Certified Crop Advisors.

Believe it or not; agriculture’s use of phosphorus is headline news! Ohio State University Extension’s soil fertility expert Dr. Robert Mullen plans to explain the science behind the attachment of P to soil particles at the January 10 West Ohio Agronomy Day. Plan to attend the program at St. Michael’s Hall in Ft. Loramie to also benefit from Purdue’s corn specialist Dr. Bob Nielsen’s advice on hybrid selection and plant pathologist Dr. Kiersten Wise’s crop disease control strategies with seed treatments and fungicides. OSU’s Dr. Ron Hammond will address insect issues with corn, soybeans, wheat and alfalfa and Mullen plans to share comments on best investment of your fertilizer dollars.… Continue reading

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New safety rules for private intrastate non-CDL drivers

by Chris Zoller,Extension Educator, ANR, Tuscarawas County

The Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) has revised its rules relative to motor carrier transportation safety. The new rules apply to businesses that use vehicles with a gross vehicle weight (GVW), gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR), or gross combination weight rating (GCWR) of 10,001 to 26,000 pounds to transport property or passengers on a not-for-hire basis in Ohio.

There have been several questions from farmers about how they will be impacted by these rule changes.

The PUCO regulation change results in intrastate, non-CDL private motor carriers being subject to the same laws as other larger trucks. (Non-CDL is 10,000 – 26,000 lbs). However, these new rules will still not apply to farm trucks which remain in Ohio because the definition of private motor carrier, and for that matter motor transportation company, specifically does not include those trucks “engaged in the transportation of farm supplies to the farm or farm products from farm to market.”… Continue reading

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Newest DuPont acquisition hits close to home in Ohio

DuPont announced it has acquired Seed Consultants, Inc., Washington C.H., Ohio, and Terral Seed, Lake Providence, La., as part of its Pioneer Hi-Bred PROaccess business strategy. Terms were not disclosed.

These two seed companies have been distributing products under the Pioneer-owned trademarks: Supreme EX brand corn hybrids and soybean varieties, distributed by Seed Consultants and  REV brand corn hybrids and soybean varieties, distributed by Terral Seed.

First introduced in December 2008, the PROaccess business strategy enables Pioneer to make available its seed genetics to more growers through a network of distributors. Pioneer will continue its PROaccess distribution agreements with other independent seed companies as previously announced, including: Beck’s Hybrids, Atlanta, Ind., distributor of XL brand corn hybrids and soybean varieties; Burrus Hybrids, Arenzville, Ill., distributor of Power Plus brand corn hybrids and soybean varieties; Doebler’s PA Hybrids Inc., Jersey Shore, Pa., distributor of RPM brand corn hybrids and soybean varieties.

In early December 2010, Pioneer closed the acquisitions of Hoegemeyer Hybrids, Hooper, Neb.,… Continue reading

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Conservation Reserve Program Celebrates 25 years

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced the 25th anniversary of the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) which has protected our nation’s natural resources since the signing of the historic Food Security Act of 1985.  The act provided for the establishment of CRP and for the protection of highly erodible land.

“CRP has a 25-year legacy of successfully protecting the nation’s natural resources through voluntary participation,” Vilsack said. “Although it was designed to address soil erosion, CRP has become one of the standouts in the USDA arsenal of conservation programs by continuing to provide significant economic and environmental benefits beyond its original intent.”

CRP was introduced at a time when soil erosion exceeded more than 3 billion tons per year, wetlands were being drained, water quality was deteriorating and wildlife populations were under stress due to the loss of habitat.  CRP provided solutions to all of these problems.  Since its inception, the program has helped reduce soil erosion by 622 million tons, provided natural habitats for wildlife, restored more than 2 million acres of wetlands and removed millions of tons of carbon dioxide from the air.… Continue reading

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The Christmas choice

By Tim Reeves, the Country Chaplain

A little over a year ago, I spent two weeks in the Holy Land on a combination sabbatical and visitation. Two dozen other pastors who like me who had also never visited the Holy Land were my traveling companions. We spent one week in Galilee and one week in Jerusalem.

As part of the Jerusalem leg, we spent a day in Bethlehem, the city of the Christmas story. We learned a great deal more about the real Christmas story than what we in the Western world know and imagine. We learned that some of the cherished images and stories of that first Christmas, which we hold so dear, are simply not true. However, what we learned makes the story even that much more personal.

For one, the shepherds were not grazing their sheep out on the hillsides at night. Nighttime grazing was not the common shepherding practice of that day.… Continue reading

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Great Lakes Professional Cattle Feeding and Marketing Short-course

The 2011 Great Lakes Professional Cattle Feeding and Marketing Short-course will be held January 19 and February 2 at the Wood County Junior Fair Building in Bowling Green Ohio. This short course is a joint effort of Ohio State University Extension, Michigan State University, and the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture to enhance the cattle industry in the Eastern Corn Belt.

The industry is implementing programs to maintain consumer confidence in the product produced in our facilities. One of these programs is audits conducted by third party entities on animal care and environmental compliance. The first session will discuss the framework for an audit for your feedlot. Other topics for the first session include animal health, and maximum dietary levels of distiller’s grain with solubles. The impacts of globalization and projections of $10/bu corn have created uncertainty about the future trends in our industry. The second session will address these trends.

Registration and refreshments will be provided beginning at 6 p.m.… Continue reading

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Publication helps ag retailers improve customer service

Excellent customer service is invaluable in any business, and agriculture is no exception. Purdue Extension provides tips for maintaining good customer relations in “An Agricultural Retailer’s Guide to Customer Care.”

The publication is geared toward agricultural retailers who sell to growers and specifically to those who provide production supplies such as chemicals, seed and fuel for farm operations, said Scott Downey, associate director of the Purdue-based Center for Food and Agricultural Business.

“One of the things that’s hard for small organizations is finding resources that are prepared well and customized for their industry,” he said. “This is created with the agricultural retailer in mind. They don’t have to pick up a business book and try to tailor it toward their needs.”

In addition to discussing the relationship between agricultural retailers and farmers, the publication reviews the importance of being responsive to changes in farm operations and maintaining customer loyalty.

“Everybody within the organization is responsible for relationships with customers,” Downey said.… Continue reading

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Soil is an overlooked resource

Advances in genetics and traits promise to accelerate yield increases in U.S. corn and soybeans. Some even say yields will double by 2030. But what’s often missing from the conversation is the critical role of soils.
Soil scientists remind us that even the most elite crop varieties need well-managed soils to provide the nutrients and water essential for high yields.
“U.S. corn and soybean farmers already are feeding whole nations,” said Jennifer Shaw, head of sustainability with Syngenta. “As we coax even more yield from every acre, soil health will become just as important as crop health in our drive to double food, feed and fiber production.”
Soils in the Corn Belt are among the world’s most productive, but they are degrading at a rate that will affect productivity unless we reverse the trend, points out Kendall Lamkey, agronomy chair with Iowa State University. Despite major gains in soil conservation, Iowa leads the nation in soil loss by water.… Continue reading

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NCBA Opposes Nomination of Ohio Judge with Ties to Animal Activists

The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) today, Dec. 21, 2010, sent a letter to U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) opposing the nomination of Judge Benita Pearson to the United States District Court for the Northern District of Ohio. NCBA Vice President of Government Affairs Colin Woodall said Pearson’s connections to the Animal Legal Defense Fund (ALDF), an organization that advocates giving animals the same legal rights as humans, would make it difficult for her to be an impartial judge in cases regarding actions by animal rights activists.

“Beef cattle producers face enough challenges today from agenda-driven activist organizations whose sole purpose is to end animal agriculture and change the 234-year old fabric of our great nation. The last thing they need is a judge furthering this agenda for well-funded animal rights activist organizations like ALDF and the Humane Society of the U.S. by legislating from the bench,” Woodall said.… Continue reading

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2010 Ohio Soybean Yield and Quality Contest winners announced

The Ohio Soybean Association (OSA) announced the winners of the 2010 Ohio Soybean Yield and Quality Contest during the Ohio Grain Farmers Symposium in Lima. This was the first year for the statewide contest and entries surpassed expectations with more than 137 applicants.

There were six yield categories available and the quality category of the contest was based on highest percentages of oil and protein.

“We were very pleased by the response and excitement we received from Ohio farmers about the contest this year,” said Jeff Wuebker, president of OSA and Darke County soybean farmer. “We had some great yields and quality results from the entries and we hope to have even more entries next year.”

This year’s Overall State Yield Champion was Don Jackson from Preble County.  Jackson recorded a yield of 81.699 with Seed Consultants 9360 variety.

The complete list of yield and quality winners is listed below:

Yield Results

Conventional Tillage                                             Yield                           Variety

Don Jackson (Preble Co.)                           … Continue reading

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HSUS teams up with Forever 21

By Amanda Radke, Beef Daily

Christmas may be just around the corner, but agriculture advocacy never takes a holiday. This just in: Forever 21, a popular clothing store for teens and 20-somethings, is now supporting the Humane Society of the U.S. (HSUS), the richest anti-animal agriculture organization in America. This is a call-to-action. I hope you will join me in writing to the company and letting them know how you feel.

This sign was discovered in New York by Dustin Homan, an agriculture leadership student at The Ohio State University. The photo was then posted on Facebook by his fellow classmate and Simmental breeder, Emily Brinkman. The sign reads, “With your purchase of this T-shirt, Forever 21 will make a $1.00 donation to HSUS. We and all our furry friends thank you!”

While I don’t think a boycott of the company is necessary, I do believe it’s critically important to educate this clothing store about the true agenda of HSUS, which is, of course, to abolish animal agriculture and eliminate consumers’ choice to put meat, dairy and eggs on the dinner table.… Continue reading

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Legitimacy of EPA Total Maximum Daily Load rule called into question

The Agricultural Nutrient Policy Council (ANPC), a coalition of agricultural groups, released a third party report last month conducted by LimnoTech that raises significant questions about the data used by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to develop and implement the Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) rule. In a report, “Assessment of the Effects of Conservation Practices on Cultivated Cropland in the Chesapeake Bay Region,” developed by the U.S Department of Agriculture (USDA), very different estimates of pollutant loads to the Chesapeake Bay are reported compared to EPA’s data.

“Basically, we have two different agencies in this administration studying the same thing but yielding completely different results,” said Ashley Lyon, deputy environmental counsel for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association. “USDA’s report clearly shows that farmers and ranchers have already significantly surpassed EPA targets for reductions in sediment and phosphorus.”

The LimnoTech report found many discrepancies between USDA’s report and EPA’s data.… Continue reading

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Ohio farm projects receive waste to value awards

Ohio Department of Development Director Lisa Patt-McDaniel has announced that 11 Ohio projects will receive $10 million in grant awards funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act’s State Energy Program

The funds will be used to convert feedstocks, such as municipal solid wastes, food and farm wastes, or other biomass or waste materials, to electricity, heat, fuel and/or other bio-products.

“These funds give businesses the ability to literally convert waste into economic value,” Patt-McDaniel said. “This program does more than offer businesses an opportunity to grow and prosper: it accelerates Ohio’s position as an advanced energy leader by enhancing energy efficiency.”

Proposals for the Transforming Waste to Value program were accepted beginning June 25, 2010. Projects submitted were selected through a competitive review process based on several criteria, including: a match investment of a minimum of 25% of total costs, project completion within 12 months, and direct economic impact to Ohio by creating and retaining jobs.… Continue reading

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No-till makes a difference where the rain meets the soil

When it comes to his no-till fields, Paul Kelly Jr. take a very keen interest in what is happening “where the rubber meets the road.” Though in this case, “where the water meets the soil” is more appropriate.

For this reason, when most farmers are parking their equipment in the barn and heading indoors due to a rainstorm, Kelly has been known to head out in the elements to observe his Clinton County fields.

“I’ve spent a lot of time walking my fields in the rain and comparing them to the conventional fields of my neighbors,” Kelly said. “I have collected jars of rainwater running off our fields and the others’ tilled fields and we never have nearly the soil loss. In the jars from my fields I would get floating crop residue. In the jars from the conventionally tilled fields there would be soil. That proved to me that the practices we are using are really performing.”… Continue reading

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Seven Ohio corn farmers recognized for outstanding yield numbers

Ohio farms are typically recognized by the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture for having higher-than-average yield numbers each year. And each year, the Ohio Corn Growers Association (OCGA) and the National Corn Growers Association reward farmers whose yields have exceeded national and state averages.

Seven Ohio farmers, listed below, were recognized by OCGA December 16 during the 2010 Ohio Grain Farmers Symposium in Lima, Ohio, as having outstanding yields:

AA Non-Irrigated


Steve and Tim Reinhard

293.891 Bushels Per Acre

Dekalb DKC62-54

Bucyrus, Ohio

AA No Till/Strip Till Non-Irrigated

Bill Putnam

285.5752 Bushels Per Acre

Dekalb DKC62-54

Conover, Ohio

No Till/Strip Till Irrigated

Jim Motycka

240.8185 Bushels Per Acre

Pioneer 33D14

Napoleon, Ohio

Ridge Till Non-Irrigated

Roger W.  Wolfe

253.3243 Bushels Per Acre

Pioneer 33W84

Baltimore, Ohio

Ridge Till Irrigated

Steven L. Meienburg

236.7612 Bushels Per Acre

Dekalb DKC61-19

Malinta, Ohio

Irrigated

Les Imboden

251.6672 Bushels Per Acre

Dekalb DKC61-69


Ashville, Ohio

“These seven individuals are a prime example of how Ohio farmers can do more with less,” said John Davis, OCGA President.… Continue reading

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