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Black, Regula & Zientek Honored at Ohio Pork Congress

Bryan Black was recognized with the Ohio Pork Industry Excellence Award at the 2011 Ohio Pork Congress held in Columbus on Feb. 9. Black was selected for his tremendous contributions representing Ohio’s pork industry on the local, state and national level.

“We are pleased to recognize Bryan with this year’s Pork Industry Excellence Award for his involvement and leadership in not only Ohio’s pork industry, but also on a national level as well,” said Dick Isler, Ohio Pork Producers Council (OPPC) executive vice president. “He’s been instrumental to OPPC and his leadership remains of great value to our organization.”

Black has served as president of both the National Pork Producers Council and the Ohio Pork Producers Council. He has also been actively involved in numerous state and national committees, and currently serving as Chairman of the Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board Swine Subcommittee.

He resides on the family swine operation outside Canal Winchester with his wife.… Continue reading

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Black, Regula & Zientek Honored at Ohio Pork Congress

Bryan Black was recognized with the Ohio Pork Industry Excellence Award at the 2011 Ohio Pork Congress held in Columbus on Feb. 9. Black was selected for his tremendous contributions representing Ohio’s pork industry on the local, state and national level.

“We are pleased to recognize Bryan with this year’s Pork Industry Excellence Award for his involvement and leadership in not only Ohio’s pork industry, but also on a national level as well,” said Dick Isler, Ohio Pork Producers Council (OPPC) executive vice president. “He’s been instrumental to OPPC and his leadership remains of great value to our organization.”

Black has served as president of both the National Pork Producers Council and the Ohio Pork Producers Council. He has also been actively involved in numerous state and national committees, and currently serving as Chairman of the Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board Swine Subcommittee.

He resides on the family swine operation outside Canal Winchester with his wife.… Continue reading

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Marestail lessons from 2010

By Mark Loux, Ohio State University Extension herbicide specialist

We conducted several studies this year that expanded our knowledge on management of marestail (horseweed).  Some of the findings reinforced what we already knew and validated our current recommendations, but we did learn some new things.  It seems as though we are still trying to figure out what the most consistently effective approach is, given that some years even good marestail management programs can fail to provide adequate control.  Among the more general studies of marestail that we always conduct, we conducted the following that had more specific objectives:

1.  Where the marestail population is both ALS- and glyphosate-resistant, is there any point in using residual herbicides in the fall?

The answer in short is – no.  Our research continues to support the fact that chlorimuron (Canopy/Cloak) is the only herbicide that persists long enough into spring to have value when applied in the fall. … Continue reading

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Corn consumption and tightening supplies

Corn consumption may be progressing too rapidly based on available supplies. Soybean consumption appears to have slowed enough so that further rationing was not required, according to a University of Illinois economist.

“Since that assessment, the cash price of corn in central Illinois has increased by 22 cents and soybean prices are up 25 cents. The higher soybean prices have resulted from a 3% increase in soybean oil prices. The average cash price of soybean meal in central Illinois has declined by $7.70 per ton, or about 2%,” said U of I economist Darrel Good.

Following is an update of the likely pace of consumption. For the 2010-11 marketing year, the USDA projects that 4.9 billion bushels of corn will be used for ethanol production. That is 7.3% more than used in the previous year. Ethanol production during the first five months of the 2010-11 marketing year was 15% larger than during the first five months of the previous year, he said.… Continue reading

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USDA to release new long-term agricultural projections

The U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) will release new 10-year agricultural projections Feb. 14 at 12:00 noon EST. The “USDA Agricultural Projections to 2020” report will be released on the Office of the Chief Economist Web site at www.usda.gov/oce. USDA publishes the projections each year in February.

The long-term projections are developed by interagency committees in USDA, with the Economic Research Service (ERS) having the lead role in the preparation of the report.  The new projections cover crop and livestock commodities, agricultural trade and aggregate indicators such as farm income, and food prices through 2020.  The projections do not represent a USDA forecast, but a conditional, long-run scenario based on specific assumptions about farm policy, weather, the economy and international developments.  Provisions of the 2008 Farm Act are incorporated into the projections and are assumed to remain in effect through 2020.  Normal weather also is assumed throughout the projection period.… Continue reading

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New requirements aim to improve Bt corn refuge compliance

In an effort to improve Bt corn refuge compliance, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)  mandated new requirements as part of the Bt corn re-registration process this past fall. The Bt corn registrants are incorporating these new requirements (outlined below) into their Compliance Assurance Programs for the 2011 growing season:

•          On-farm refuge compliance assessments will be conducted by an independent third-party and will be focused on (i) areas of highest risk of insect pest resistance development and (ii) growers who did not buy sufficient refuge seed from the Bt corn registrant.

•          Growers found to be out of compliance with the refuge requirements (i) now have a higher probability of losing access to Bt corn if compliance is not established and maintained and (ii) will be checked more frequently by the Bt corn registrants.

•          Seed bag tags will better depict refuge size requirements

Under the Compliance Assurance Program, thousands of growers are surveyed about their IRM compliance practices each year through EPA mandated on-farm assessments. … Continue reading

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Update from the Ohio Lake Erie Phosphorus Task Force

A conversation with Todd Hesterman, Henry County no-till farmer on the Ohio Lake Erie Phosphorus Task Force

OCJ: Can you provide a little background about the Ohio Lake Erie Phosphorus Task Force?

Todd: In January 2007, in consultation with Heidelberg University, Ohio EPA convened the Ohio Lake Erie Phosphorus Task Force. The goals of the Task Force were: to identify and evaluate potential point and nonpoint sources of phosphorus to Ohio tributaries; determine what practices may have changed since 1995 that could increase DRP loads; examine various aspects of agriculture that might influence the increase in DRP loads; review the possible/probable relationships of the increased DRP loads to the eutrophication problems that have returned to Lake Erie (particularly the western basin); consider the impacts of zebra and quagga mussels in altering the internal cycling of phosphorus in the lake itself; determine if these issues were unique to Lake Erie or occurring on a broader basis; identify research and monitoring needs; and recommend management actions that could be implemented to alleviate current conditions.… Continue reading

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Flames Engulf Egg Farm Barn

A fire destroyed at least one barn early Saturday morning at an egg farm in Licking County.

Firefighters from several departments were called to the Ohio Fresh Eggs complex, located near the corner of Croton and Benner roads in Johnstown, at about 6:30am

Several residents captured pictures of flames engulfing a barn there. This picture is courtesy of Leslie BeVier.

A company spokeswoman said a heater inside one of the barns may have started the fire, according to Columbus TV station WBNS.

The spokeswoman said no chickens were inside the barn and no injuries were reported.… Continue reading

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NASCAR season powered by ethanol is almost here

As the 2011 NASCAR season launches with a new, greener fuel, the nation’s corn growers are joining forces with NASCAR to promote the use of corn-based American ethanol. As an Official Partner of NASCAR, The National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) will leverage its relationship to spread the message to NASCAR fans around the country about the role American farmers play in the development of ethanol.

In December 2010, NASCAR unveiled its landmark partnership with American Ethanol just weeks after announcing a 2011 switch in its three major national series to Sunoco Green E15, a new 15% ethanol blend fuel made with corn grown in the United States. Growth Energy, a leading ethanol advocacy organization, created the American Ethanol partnership to push for broad acceptance of a renewable domestic fuel for all American motorists.

“We’re greatly excited about this opportunity to help educate NASCAR fans at the race tracks and around the country about the great work of our corn growers in feeding and fueling the world,” said Darrin Ihnen, NCGA Chairman, a family farmer from Hurley, S.D.… Continue reading

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Ohio Cattlemen’s King Recongized for Excellence in Communications

The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) recognized three communications professionals for their work in 2010 advocating for the U.S. beef industry. Specifically, NCBA awarded Jamie King, Ohio Cattlemen’s Association (OCA) communications director, and Eric Grant, manager of Angus Publications, Inc., with the Excellence in Communications and Public Relations award and Ron Hays with the Radio Oklahoma Network with the Excellence in Agricultural Journalism award.

“Day in and day out, communicators like Jamie, Eric and Ron go to work to tell the story of the U.S. beef industry. Whether they are keeping producers informed about market shifts or policy changes, or educating consumers about the realities of modern beef production, our industry relies on timely and accurate delivery of information,” NCBA Vice President of Government Affairs Colin Woodall said. “While there are many folks deserving of recognition for their hard work, these three communicators have gone above and beyond in their efforts telling the true story about the U.S.… Continue reading

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Ohio Cattlemen's King Recongized for Excellence in Communications

The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) recognized three communications professionals for their work in 2010 advocating for the U.S. beef industry. Specifically, NCBA awarded Jamie King, Ohio Cattlemen’s Association (OCA) communications director, and Eric Grant, manager of Angus Publications, Inc., with the Excellence in Communications and Public Relations award and Ron Hays with the Radio Oklahoma Network with the Excellence in Agricultural Journalism award.

“Day in and day out, communicators like Jamie, Eric and Ron go to work to tell the story of the U.S. beef industry. Whether they are keeping producers informed about market shifts or policy changes, or educating consumers about the realities of modern beef production, our industry relies on timely and accurate delivery of information,” NCBA Vice President of Government Affairs Colin Woodall said. “While there are many folks deserving of recognition for their hard work, these three communicators have gone above and beyond in their efforts telling the true story about the U.S.… Continue reading

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Are you using enough residual herbicide in your herbicide-tolerant corn?

By Mark Loux, Ohio State University Extension herbicide specialist

If you have been growing corn and soybean or advising growers for several decades, it’s possible to remember how the ease of controlling weeds has switched back and forth between the two crops.  There have been periods when control is easier in corn than soybeans (early days of atrazine) and then those when the reverse has been true (early days of Roundup Ready soybeans).  The development of glyphosate resistance issues has resulted in a trend where currently several weeds are more effectively and/or less expensively controlled in corn than in soybeans.  Or as Dickens might have said if he was a weed scientist – “It was the best of times in corn, it was the worst of times in soybeans.”  This is certainly not true for all growers, since some still have great success in Roundup Ready soybeans.  We do believe though however that for several tougher weeds that have developed glyphosate resistance – giant and common ragweed, marestail, and waterhemp – it’s essential to get effective control in corn to reduce the population that has to be managed in soybeans.  … Continue reading

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Record number of OSU talks at Ohio organic food, farm conference

The Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association (OEFFA) will hold Ohio’s biggest conference on organic and sustainable agriculture next month, and Ohio State University will be well represented there. Ohio State scientists, specialists and students will give 19 presentations –the most ever from the university — as part of the program.

OEFFA’s 32nd annual conference takes place Feb. 19-20 in Granville in central Ohio. “Inspiring Farms, Sustaining Communities” is the theme.

“Our conference title says a lot about what we believe and what we’re trying to accomplish,” OEFFA Executive Director Carol Goland said. “People who attend the conference are so moved by the inspiring examples of innovation and stewardship they learn from presenters and fellow participants.”

The Ohio State presenters are from the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its research and outreach arms, the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) and Ohio State University Extension.

The college is home to such programs as the Sustainable Agriculture Team, the Agroecosystems Management Program, and the Organic Food and Farm Education and Research (OFFER) Program.… Continue reading

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Economic injury levels and economic thresholds

By Ron Hammond and Andy Michel, Ohio State University Extension entomologists

The concept of economic injury levels (EILs) is the critical idea in integrated pest management (IPM). The general definition of the EIL is that point when economic damage that occurs from insect injury equals the cost of managing that insect population.  In a word, it is the breakeven point.  Damage that occurs below that point is not worth the cost of preventing it; the cost of the insecticide application would be greater than the damage you would be preventing.

We determine EILs by taking into effect the value of the product (such as $ per bushel), the cost of insecticide treatment (such as $ per acre), and how much crop damage is caused by a certain amount of insect injury.   While the former two values are easy to determine or predict, the latter two, insect injury and damage, comes from many years of research.  … Continue reading

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USDA announces planting transferabilty pilot project

The USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) Planting Transferability Pilot Project (PTPP) permits Ohio producers to plant approved vegetables for processing on base acres under the Direct and Counter-Cyclical Program (DCP) or Average Crop Revenue Election Program (ACRE). Eligible producers have until March 1, 2011 to sign-up for the PTPP program. USDA will not accept any late filed applications.

“PTPP offers producers the opportunity to diversify their crop production and better use their base acres. This project supports state farmers with additional sources of revenue and the production of healthy fruits and vegetables,” said Steve Maurer, Ohio FSA State Executive Director.

PTPP allows producers to plant approved fruits or vegetables for processing on a farm’s base acres. Approved plantings include cucumbers, green peas, lima beans, pumpkin, snap beans, sweet corn or tomatoes. Without the PTPP, planting these crops on base acres would be prohibited. Base acres on a farm will be temporarily reduced each year on an acre-for-acre basis, for each base acre planted with an approved fruit or vegetable on that farm.… Continue reading

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Don’t put daddy’s toothbrush in the toilet!

By Matt Reese

My wife and I try not to have a long list of silly rules for our children to follow, but sometimes, their actions warrant rules.

Here are a few of the strange rules in Reese family law.

  1. Do not stand on the table. There are clear safety issues when an 18-month old is standing on pretty much anything. Plus, no one wants the feet of anyone (even a cute kid) in, on, or around the food.
  2. Do not unroll toilet paper for any reason. There are, of course, very important reasons why toilet paper needs to be unrolled. But, due to our children’s seemingly insatiable desire to unroll the entire roll onto the floor and around our home on a regular basis, we had to enforce very strict guidelines. For now, mom and dad do the necessary unrolling to prevent an in-house TP party.
  3. Do not pet the dog.
Continue reading

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Don't put daddy's toothbrush in the toilet!

By Matt Reese

My wife and I try not to have a long list of silly rules for our children to follow, but sometimes, their actions warrant rules.

Here are a few of the strange rules in Reese family law.

  1. Do not stand on the table. There are clear safety issues when an 18-month old is standing on pretty much anything. Plus, no one wants the feet of anyone (even a cute kid) in, on, or around the food.
  2. Do not unroll toilet paper for any reason. There are, of course, very important reasons why toilet paper needs to be unrolled. But, due to our children’s seemingly insatiable desire to unroll the entire roll onto the floor and around our home on a regular basis, we had to enforce very strict guidelines. For now, mom and dad do the necessary unrolling to prevent an in-house TP party.
  3. Do not pet the dog.
Continue reading

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Ohio Soybean Association and Ohio Soybean Council proud of 2010 accomplishments

The Ohio Soybean Association (OSA) and the Ohio Soybean Council (OSC) worked to improve profitability and awareness of the industry in 2010 and numerous successes were achieved.

OSC and the soybean checkoff focused on research, development, promotion and education initiatives, while OSA worked in areas that included producer education and policy development.  Because checkoff dollars cannot be used for legislative activities, this partnership will continue to play an important role in keeping Ohio’s 26,000 soybean farmers profitable in an increasingly competitive industry.

Below are some examples of their success in 2010:

Soy bioproducts: More than a decade ago, OSC and its partner, Battelle, began the development of a soy-based toner. In 2010, this technology made it to the campus of The Ohio State University (OSU). The toner was adopted into many of the printers on campus, making the university one of the leading users of soy-based toner in the nation.

OSC also launched a consumer-friendly, interactive website this year (www.soyinside.orgContinue reading

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Spring Beekeeping Workshop to be Held March 4-5 in Wooster

Ohio State University Extension and the Tri-County Beekeepers Association of Northeastern Ohio will hold their 33rd Annual Spring Beekeeping Workshop the evening of Friday, March 4, and all day Saturday, March 5, at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center’s (OARDC) Wooster campus. 

The largest one-day beekeeping workshop in the United States (over 900 people attended in 2010), this year’s event will have as its theme “Honey Bees-Back from the Brink.” All events will take place at Fisher Auditorium, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster.

Pre-registration fee is $35 per adult over 17; walk-in registration is $45; Tri-County Beekeepers Association members pay $30 for pre-registration; and youth, ages 17 and under, pay $5. Vendor registration is $75 per table and includes one person’s registration. A hot turkey lunch with mashed potatoes, vegetable and homemade pie or a boxed lunch will be offered for an additional charge with pre-registration only. 

Friday evening’s program begins at 7 p.m.… Continue reading

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Action alert from OFBF on Ohio's estate tax

Ohio Farm Bureau is encouraging members to contact their state legislators about Ohio’s estate tax. Elimination of the state estate tax, coupled with significant federal estate tax reforms, will allow additional generations to keep their land in farming, strengthen the rural economy and preserve Ohio’s agricultural heritage.

For more, visit: http://ofbf.org/news-and-events/news/1168/.… Continue reading

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