Featured News



Five-bean pods showing up in Ohio

With many farmers reporting five-bean pods in their Asgrow brand Genuity Roundup Ready 2 Yield fields last season, excitement has been building to see who would be the first to find a five-bean pod this season, and the wait is over! Bill Gartner of Lawrenceville, Ill., has become the first farmer to discover several five-bean pods in 2010.
Gartner planted about 425 acres of this advanced soybean technology, hoping to join the exclusive Team 5-Bean. Once a rarity, five-bean pods have now become a reality with the Asgrow brand Genuity Roundup Ready 2 Yield that gives farmers the opportunity to produce more soybeans per pod and more bushels per acre.
“Our Asgrow Genuity Roundup Ready 2 Yield soybeans were planted in mid-April so they have really taken off with the weather we have had,” said Gartner. “They are in full pod, and I have been seeing about 20 pods per plant already.”… Continue reading

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OSU ag professor honored for global commitment


On his way home from work every evening, Herbert Ockerman makes it a habit to stop at three outlets of Half-Price Books to purchase textbooks, literature or “anything that would fit into a school or university library.”

He boxes them up with other books he collects, including donations from retiring faculty members, and stores them in his garage, basement and living room. When he has enough for a shipment, he has a shipping container delivered to his neighborhood in northern Columbus and enlists the help of friends, family, students and other volunteers to fill it up. Then it’s ready to send overseas, primarily to universities where former international students are now faculty members or administrators. Ockerman, professor of animal sciences with Ohio State University’sCollege of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences, has done this since 1984, coordinating more than 1,500 shipments to thousands of educational institutions in more than 350 locations around the world.… Continue reading

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The Belmont County Fair finds a new home

By Matt Reese

“It is the same old thing, but this time it is all new.”
Jerry Campbell, president of the Belmont County Fair Board is excited, nervous and scared all at the same time as he leads the effort for yet another Belmont County Fair beginning on Sept. 7. In many ways, it will be the same as past fairs in the county, with junior exhibitors, events, and a community that is always supportive of the event. But this year, it will be the first time at a new location.
The Belmont County Fair long called a 17-acre site in St. Clairsville home, but the location offered no room to grow. This year will be the first fair at the new 162-acre location just outside of East Richland, 5.5 miles west of the previous site.
“That is a huge difference,” Campbell said. “We sold the former fairgrounds four years ago and had the fair there through last year while we worked on the new site.… Continue reading

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Syngenta offers new blog and hybrids for 2011

Syngenta Seeds, Inc. has launched a new agronomy blog that gives growers local insights from nine Syngenta agronomists representing nine regions across the country. Posts will cover a broad range of corn producing states.

In addition, unlike many other existing grower blogs, encourages comments to posts that enable growers, farm managers, crop consultants and others involved in the industry to engage in an ongoing dialogue with each other and Syngenta agronomists.

“Syngenta prides itself on the relationships that we, as agronomists, have created with growers all across the country,” said Chris Cook, head of agronomy for Syngenta Seeds. “We hope this new blog will help strengthen and improve those relationships.”

American growers are increasingly going online to look for information to help them grow their operation. Syngenta Seeds is meeting this demand by bringing the expertise of the agronomy team, that has traditionally only been available in the field, and making it available online.… Continue reading

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Ohio Cattlemen’s President says agreement with HSUS was the right choice

By: Dave Felumlee, President Ohio Cattlemen’s Association

To all Ohio Cattlemen’s Association members and stakeholders,

After many phone calls, e-mails and discussions, I writing this to elaborate on the reasons why I believe the correct decision was made to reach an agreement with HSUS. There were many, many factors that contributed to this decision and it was made with much thought, and even some pain of conflict with my own emotions. I feel very fortunate that the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association was at the table to express our concerns and thoughts throughout the process.

From the beginning, the commodity groups and Farm Bureau agreed that it was in everyone’s best interest to work together and be unified as one voice. This began in the issue 2 campaign, and has remained this way even today. This is Ohio agriculture’s fight! Each individual at the table had an equal vote and an equal voice.… Continue reading

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Ohio Cattlemen's President says agreement with HSUS was the right choice

By: Dave Felumlee, President Ohio Cattlemen’s Association

To all Ohio Cattlemen’s Association members and stakeholders,

After many phone calls, e-mails and discussions, I writing this to elaborate on the reasons why I believe the correct decision was made to reach an agreement with HSUS. There were many, many factors that contributed to this decision and it was made with much thought, and even some pain of conflict with my own emotions. I feel very fortunate that the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association was at the table to express our concerns and thoughts throughout the process.

From the beginning, the commodity groups and Farm Bureau agreed that it was in everyone’s best interest to work together and be unified as one voice. This began in the issue 2 campaign, and has remained this way even today. This is Ohio agriculture’s fight! Each individual at the table had an equal vote and an equal voice.… Continue reading

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Valuing manure nutrient resources

By Robert Mullen and Darlene C. Florence, Ohio State University Extension

A fundamental question often asked by agricultural producers is how do I value my manure as a nutrient resource? This essential question should be asked by those that have access to manure because it allows a way to quantify the economic value of that material. If this question were directed at commercially produced materials, the answer would be straightforward. With manure, however, a number of parameters need to be considered including the composition of manure, the source variability, and the need for the nutrients based upon soil test information.

The first step in valuing manure as a nutrient supplement is to have the material analyzed to determine which nutrients are present and in what amounts. This information, combined with a recent soil analysis, can tell you how much manure should be supplied to meet the nutritional needs of a crop.… Continue reading

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Southwest Landmark & Advanced Agri Solutions are now Trupointe

Trupointe Cooperative, Inc. is officially in operation today in 26 Ohio and 3 Indiana counties after the successful consolidation of two long-time area agriculture and energy cooperatives. Forty-five Advanced Agri-Solutions and Southwest Landmark branch locations throughout western and central Ohio and eastern Indiana make up the company.

“With the combined employee base, we are able to provide more resources and expertise for our more than 4,300 members,” said farmer and Chairman of Trupointe’s Board of Directors John Waymire. “It is not only a win for each of our companies, but for the customer as well.”

The cooperative will offer a full line of products, services and expertise in the areas of:
• Agronomy – fertilizer, crop protection and seed treatments
• Energy – propane and liquid fuel
• Farm and Home – lawn and garden, home and pet supply
• Feed – commercial, club livestock and horses
• Grain – marketing and risk management
• Turf – landscape and nursery

“It has been a smooth transition,” said Chief Executive Officer of Trupointe Larry Hammond.… Continue reading

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Southwest Landmark & Advanced Agri Solutions are now Trupointe

Trupointe Cooperative, Inc. is officially in operation today in 26 Ohio and 3 Indiana counties after the successful consolidation of two long-time area agriculture and energy cooperatives. Forty-five Advanced Agri-Solutions and Southwest Landmark branch locations throughout western and central Ohio and eastern Indiana make up the company.

“With the combined employee base, we are able to provide more resources and expertise for our more than 4,300 members,” said farmer and Chairman of Trupointe’s Board of Directors John Waymire. “It is not only a win for each of our companies, but for the customer as well.”

The cooperative will offer a full line of products, services and expertise in the areas of:
• Agronomy – fertilizer, crop protection and seed treatments
• Energy – propane and liquid fuel
• Farm and Home – lawn and garden, home and pet supply
• Feed – commercial, club livestock and horses
• Grain – marketing and risk management
• Turf – landscape and nursery

“It has been a smooth transition,” said Chief Executive Officer of Trupointe Larry Hammond.… Continue reading

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FSR at a glance

2010 FSR features at a glance

• This is the 48th Farm Science Review, the 28th at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center.

• Hundreds of demonstration plots and several million dollars worth of machinery.

• Twenty-first-year inductions into the Farm Science Review Hall of Fame.

• Ohio Farmer Conservation Awards; Thursday at 11:30 a.m.

• OSU Central, featuring demonstrations and displays from Ohio State University colleges and departments.

• A lot of farm safety, home safety and health information.

• Global Positioning Systems (GPS) hands-on demonstrations in the demonstration fields.

• Expanded programs on conservation practices in the Gwynne Conservation Area.

• An arts and crafts exhibit tent.

• Permanent washroom facilities with diaper changing stations.

Field demonstrations

Harvesting, strip-tilling, global positioning and tillage demonstrations will take place every day. Check the schedule at fsr.osu.edu for demonstration times.

Commercial exhibits

The commercial exhibit area hosts about 600 exhibitors from all across North America in the Central Exhibit Area.… Continue reading

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Be skeptical of side-by-side comparisons this year

By Ryan McAllister, CCA, Team Sales Agronomist for Beck’s Hybrids

Take caution in putting too much stock in a side by side this year, especially if large yield swings exist in that trial. I say this for multiple reasons.

1. Consistency in hybrid maturity exists within a seed company but not necessarily among seed companies. Beck’s 109-day will be earlier than our 110-day. However, Beck’s 110-day and Acme seed brands 110-day could be different. Why would that matter?
2. If you are doing any side by side and have 108 versus 110 or even 110 vs. 110, two different companies, timing is everything. I have been in plots where one hybrid was tipped back 3 inches and the one beside it only 1 inch. Silk death had occurred on the hybrid that was attempting pollination at a slightly different time. That silk death was more due to “bad 90+ degree timing” than it was to the hybrid itself.… Continue reading

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Win Your Community $2,500 Through Monsanto's Farmers Grow Communities Project

The America’s Farmers Grow Communities Project sponsored by Monsanto gives eligible farmers the opportunity to win $2,500 for their local community. If the farmer is selected as a winner, Monsanto Fund will make a $2,500 grant to the community nonprofit organization they choose, such as FFA, 4-H, schools, fire departments and other civic groups.

For every farmer who registers, Monsanto Fund will donate $1 to the local United Way to help food banks, food pantries, Meals On Wheels and other charitable organizations dealing with hunger in that farmer’s county.

Registration begins August 31, 2010, and ends December 31, 2010. Apply and see rues and eligibility at www.growcommunities.com or call 1-877-267-3332.

America’s Farmers Grow Communities Project Details

Eligible Counties

See previous Ohio winners

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Win Your Community $2,500 Through Monsanto’s Farmers Grow Communities Project

The America’s Farmers Grow Communities Project sponsored by Monsanto gives eligible farmers the opportunity to win $2,500 for their local community. If the farmer is selected as a winner, Monsanto Fund will make a $2,500 grant to the community nonprofit organization they choose, such as FFA, 4-H, schools, fire departments and other civic groups.

For every farmer who registers, Monsanto Fund will donate $1 to the local United Way to help food banks, food pantries, Meals On Wheels and other charitable organizations dealing with hunger in that farmer’s county.

Registration begins August 31, 2010, and ends December 31, 2010. Apply and see rues and eligibility at www.growcommunities.com or call 1-877-267-3332.

America’s Farmers Grow Communities Project Details

Eligible Counties

See previous Ohio winners

Continue reading

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August 30th Weekly Crop Progress

Ohio Numbers

The average temperature for the State was 69.1 degrees, 2.0 degrees below normal for the week ending Sunday, August 29, 2010. Precipitation averaged 0.03 inches, 0.82 inches below normal. There were 128 modified growing degree days, 18 days below normal.

Reporters rated 6.2 days suitable for fieldwork during the seven-day period ending Friday, August 27, 2010. Topsoil moisture was rated 9 percent very short, 39 percent short, 51 percent adequate, and 1 percent surplus.

As of Sunday August 29, 96 percent of corn was in dough, compared to 81 percent last year and 86 percent for the five-year average. Seventy-two percent of corn was dented, compared to 32 percent last year and 45 percent for the five-year average. Corn was 7 percent mature, which was five percent ahead of last year and four percent ahead of the five-year average. Corn for silage was 28 percent harvested compared to nine percent last year and 11 percent for the five-year average.… Continue reading

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Now that the dust has settled, how does “the agreement” impact animal ag?

By Kyle Sharp

The agreement between Ohio agriculture and the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) has been the source of controversy, scrutiny and grumbling on both sides of the issue. Here are some perspectives from leaders in the sectors of agriculture that will be most affected.

Impact on pork
Chuck Wildman operates a 650-sow, farrow-to-finish hog operation near South Charleston. He was not thrilled when the agreement with HSUS was reached. But after considering the political strategy of how the agreement bought the OLCSB time to work and established the Board as the governing authority for livestock care standards, he said it now seems like it was the right thing to do.
When people say to him HSUS came out ahead in the agreement, Wildman has an interesting way of describing this thoughts.
“If you’re in a bar fight and one guy lays down his weapon and leaves the bar for a while, and the other guy is still standing there in the bar huffing and puffing, who won?”… Continue reading

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SDS showing up in soybeans

Sudden Death Syndrome has been showing up from late July into August, but it really got its start back on those cool damp days in May. X. P. Yang, an expert on the subject from Iowa State, says the plants actually got infected in after germination and during emergence when soil conditions are right. The fungus lives in the plant roots making its way into the xylem where it then gets transported throughout the plant.

Making the problem worse are soil compaction and the added stress of soybean cyst nematodes. The plant eventually looses its leaves and is unable to produce.

It will over winter in the crop residue and actually survives better on corn stalks than soybean residue so a corn beans rotation does not help.

Management practices include selecting tolerant varieties, improving soil drainage while managing soil compaction and SCN. It may also help to plant infected fields later to reduce risk of further infection of new crop.… Continue reading

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Now that the dust has settled, what does “the agreement” really do?

By Kyle Sharp

Many in Ohio agriculture reacted with disbelief on June 30 when Ohio’s agricultural leadership announced an agreement had been reached with the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) regarding farm animal welfare measures.
After passage of Issue 2 last year created the Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board (OLCSB) and the subsequent effort by HSUS to gather signatures for their own ballot initiative began, the battle lines appeared to be drawn.

“The initial response was surprise from people, because a lot of people, including many in leadership positions, were under the impression we were going to move forward and succeed as we did with Issue 2,” said Dick Isler, Ohio Pork Producers Council (OPPC) executive vice president.

But early poll numbers showed the HSUS ballot initiative passing by more than 60%.

“We realized we had to come up with another plan,” Isler said. “If the HSUS initiative passed, then in six years there could be no laying hen cages or gestation stalls, and that really would have hurt a lot of producers.”… Continue reading

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With crop fertilizer, there can be too much of a good thing

By Matt Reese

Nitrogen is a critical nutrient in corn production and farmers, crop consultants, the Joyce Foundation, the Natural Resources Conservation Service and the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) are teaming up to find out how much a productive corn crop really needs.
In the past, nitrogen applications have been based on the yield potential of the field.
In the past, when the N cost was very low, the safe bet was to add a little extra to make sure that it was not the limiting factor in corn production. High N cost and increasing awareness of the potential water quality impacts, however, have made that safe bet of the past not so safe anymore. But determining how much N is needed to maximize corn production while minimizing costs and environmental impact is not easy.
In the On-Farm Network of N research plots in part of the Lake Erie Watershed in northwest Ohio, crop consultant Joe Nester has been working extensively to target the ideal rate of the nutrient for the specifics of each unique situation in the field.… Continue reading

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Iowa's grand champion steer a clone of 2008 grand champion

By Dale Minyo

This year’s Grand Champion Steer at the Iowa State Fair is a clone of the 2008 Grand Champion Steer. Yes it is legal, or at least no rules were broken.

The 1,320 pound steer was produced by Bovance, a joint venture between Trans Ova and the cloning firm ViaGen. The exhibitor’s dad is the president of Trans Ova Genetics, a livestock reproduction company in Iowa. Bovance bought the cloned steer for a record-setting $45,000 bid at the auction to keep the animal out of the food chain.

For more on this visit:http://www.dtnprogressivefarmer.com/dtnag/common/link.do?symbolicName=/free/news/template1&product=/ag/news/topstories&vendorReference=0353b2fa-34a2-481b-912d-1cb46058ad3a&paneContentId=70109&paneParentId=70043 or http://brownfieldagnews.com/2010/08/25/iowa-grand-champion-steer-was-clone-of-2008-champ/… Continue reading

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