Ohio Crop Progress

Ohio’s Crop Progress – Corn 40%, Beans 13% Planted

There were 4.6 days suitable for fieldwork in Ohio during the week ending May 11, according to the USDA, NASS, Great Lakes Region. Precipitation in areas around the state for the week ranged between 0 inches and 1.31 inches, with a state average of 0.75 inches. Average temperatures in areas around the state ranged from 55 degrees to 67 degrees, with a state average of 57.9 degrees Fahrenheit. Weather conditions around the state this week were highly conducive to fieldwork, as warmer temperatures and clear conditions dried out the soil and gave most producers a chance to get into their fields. Growers were able to make significant progress planting corn, soybeans and oats.… Continue reading

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Ohio’s Crop Progress – Planting ahead of 2013

There were 1.4 days suitable for fieldwork in Ohio during the week ending May 4, according to the USDA, NASS, Great Lakes Region. Precipitation for the week ranged between 0.28 inches and 4.40 inches, with a state average of 2.01 inches. Average temperatures ranged from 50.0 degrees to 60.0 degrees, with a state average of 55.0 degrees Fahrenheit. Rain throughout the state kept producers out of their fields for the majority of the week. When able to get into the fields, most producers were confined to tillage and fertilizer application, though some planting occurred. Corn and soybean plantings are now both slightly ahead of the 2013 season, but are behind the 5-year average. Oats, on the other hand, are behind compared to both 2013 and the 5-year average. The cold, wet weather has not only slowed planting, but has slowed forage growth and kept already planted corn from emerging. Producers have been prepping machinery so that when the weather warms up, they will be able to rapidly begin the bulk of fieldwork.… Continue reading

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Ohio’s Crop Progress – Some corn planted in Ohio

There were 3.7 days suitable for fieldwork in Ohio during the week ending April 27, according to the USDA, NASS, Great Lakes Region. Precipitation for the week ranged between 0.30 inches and 0.47 inches. Average temperatures ranged from 49.0 degrees to 55.8 degrees, with a state average of 53.0 degrees Fahrenheit. Warmer temperatures and less rain allowed producers to spend more time in the field this week. Field work activities included tillage, topdressing wheat, and fertilizer and lime application. Producers have begun planting oats more heavily. While some corn planting has begun, many producers delayed planting due to concerns about cool soils and weather forecasts for the coming week. A small amount soybean planting was reported. While progress for all three crops seems to be slow relative to the 5 year averages, it’s important to note that those averages include the unusually fast years of 2012 and 2010. Winter wheat and hay and pasture conditions are mixed, with most reporting fair to good condition.… Continue reading

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Ohio’s Crop Progress – Corn planting behind the 5-year average

There were 2 days suitable for fieldwork in Ohio during the week ending April 20, according to the USDA, NASS, Great Lakes Region. Cold temperatures and wet ground conditions continued to keep many producers out of their fields for most of the week. Nitrogen was applied to many wheat fields, and those where nitrogen was applied early are greening up quicker than the rest of the crop. Producers have been planting oats when possible, especially in the southern parts of the state where the weather has been more conducive to field work. Oat planting is behind last year and the 5 year average.  Little to no corn has been planted, with a few reports of corn going in the ground. Fertilizer was spread in anticipation of planting. While corn planting is behind the 5 year average, it is generally in line with 2013, which at this point in time only 1% of the crop had been planted.… Continue reading

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Still too wet for fieldwork in Ohio

The latest NASS Crop Progress Report for Ohio proves that the snow melt and additional rainfall are keeping farmers out of the fields, but signs of Spring are showing up.

According to the report:

There were 0.9 days suitable for fieldwork in Ohio during the week ending April 13, according to the USDA, NASS, Great Lakes Region. While warmer temperatures dried the soil some, it was still too wet for most producers to do any field work. Some areas are still flooded from snow melt and rain. Winter Wheat and hay fields are starting to green up. Some producers have been able to spread manure.Continue reading

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Ohio’s Crop Progress Report – April 8th, 2014

There was 1 day suitable for fieldwork in Ohio during the week ending April 6, according to the USDA, NASS, Great Lakes Region. With continuing cold temperatures and heavy rain towards the end of the week, producers were limited to very little or no fieldwork. The work that has been done is limited to top dressing of wheat and some manure application. A small number of farmers have been able to begin planting oats. The majority of fields have yet to be touched, though, due to continued cold temperatures and flooding from snow melt combined with heavy rain. Winter wheat is beginning to green up, but many still believe it is too early to judge how well the crop weathered the harsh winter. While producers are finding themselves behind on spring fieldwork, producers typically would not begin planting corn for another week and soybeans until late April.

For the complete report, click here.Continue reading

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Ohio’s Crop Progress Report – November 18th, 2013

There were five days suitable for fieldwork in Ohio during the week ending November 17, according to the USDA, NASS, Great Lakes Region. Producers largely finished up harvesting of the remaining double-cropped soybeans this week, and made significant progress harvesting corn before snow and moist soil slowed progress in many regions. The moisture content of harvested corn averaged 19 percent. Heavy winds from the storms that swept through the State Sunday night may have damaged remaining corn, but it is too early to know if there was significant damage anywhere. Producers also spent the week on fall tillage, but the moist ground hampered efforts.

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