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Pro Farmer’s Final 2012 Yield Estimates

2012 U.S. corn crop at 10.478 billion bu.; avg. yield 120.25 bu. per acre
+/- 1% = 10.374 billion bu. to 10.583 billion bu.; 119.05 bu. to 121.45 bu. per acre

2012 U.S. soybean crop at 2.60 billion bu.; avg. yield of 34.8 bu. per acre
+/- 2% = 2.548 billion bu. to 2.652 billion bu.; 34.1 bu. to 35.5 bu. per acre

NOTE: Pro Farmer made some adjustments to the acreage assumptions. Based on FSA certified acreage data they anticipate increases in planted acreage for both corn and soybeans. However, they are anticipating a harvested acreage percentage of 89.5% for corn and a slight downward adjustment in the harvested acreage percentage for soybeans.

CORN

Ohio: 124 bu. per acre. The Midwest drought started in northwest Ohio. South and east of there extreme moisture and heat stress will guarantee below-average corn yields.

Indiana: 101 bu. per acre. Eastern Indiana showed extreme drought stress.… Continue reading

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Resistant palmer amaranth found in Ohio

A weed known to many cotton and soybean growers in the South as “pigweed on steroids” has been spotted in Ohio, prompting Ohio State University Extension experts to warn Ohio growers to take measures to prevent its further spread statewide.

Palmer amaranth, which is a glyphosate-resistant weed that has had a substantially negative impact on crop yields and profitability for cotton and soybean growers in Southern states, has been spotted in a large field near Portsmouth in extreme southern Ohio,  said Mark Loux, an OSU Extension weed specialist.

The concern about glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth, which has caused entire cotton and soybean fields to be mowed down in some Southern states, is that if the weed takes hold in Ohio crop fields, it will be even harder to control than the glyphosate-resistant weeds already present statewide, he said.

“Not only is Palmer amaranth resistant to glyphosate, this weed’s rapid growth, large size, extended duration of emergence, prolific seed production and general tolerance to many herbicides makes it a much more formidable weed to deal with than the pigweed species we already have here in Ohio,” Loux said.… Continue reading

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Beware of rising nitrate levels in forages

Drought conditions that have gripped Ohio and many parts of the Midwest could increase the potential for rising nitrate levels in forages, an Ohio State University Extension expert says.

That means growers and producers need to take extra care to test corn they feed their livestock to ensure that nitrate levels aren’t high enough to sicken or kill the animal, said Bruce Clevenger, an Extension educator and a member of Ohio State’s Agronomic Crops Team.

“It’s important that farmers take steps to make sure drought-stressed forage is safe to eat,” he said. “Drought-stressed corn has the potential for elevated levels of nitrate in the stalks.”

Nitrate poisoning is a real concern for livestock production right now because of the ongoing drought conditions impacting growers statewide, Clevenger said.

This is a significant concern for growers and producers, considering most of Ohio except for some counties near the Kentucky, West Virginia and Pennsylvania borders is experiencing moderate drought, with some counties near the Indiana and Michigan borders experiencing severe and extreme drought as of Aug.… Continue reading

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Be wary at county fairs as H3N2V spreading

The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) and the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) announced the launch of an outreach plan to increase awareness of H3N2v at county fairs. A representative from ODA and ODH, or a local designee such as the fair veterinarian or health commissioner, will visit every fair to make in-person contact with swine exhibitors and reinforce the importance of preventing the spread of flu. As part of that outreach, ODA has set guidance for fair boards. Together, the agencies created an informational video for fairgoers and exhibitors: http://youtu.be/WBJsCcqscU0.

ODH has confirmed six additional cases of Influenza A variant H3N2 in Ohio. There are currently 36 cases of H3N2v statewide. At this time, surveillance indicates that the individuals most likely became ill with the flu virus after exposure to swine.

County of Residence

Number of Confirmed H3N2v Cases

Butler

16

Clark

3

Gallia

6

Greene

4

Hamilton

3

Medina

1

Monroe

2

Morrow

1

Those with confirmed cases of H3N2v are between the ages of 6 months and 36 years old.… Continue reading

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Ears from the March 22nd corn {August 13th update}

On April 10, 2012 we reported on some of the first corn to come up in Ohio. It was planted on March 22, 2012 in Fayette County. We are going to follow that field along through to harvest. See the field’s complete progress from March 22nd up until now.

These shots were taken about four or five rows in. The other fields in the area have now caught up with this field.

 

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Lawsuit seeks to cripple the Beef Checkoff Program

National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) President J.D. Alexander expressed disgust following an announcement that the Organization for Competitive Markets (OCM) has formed a partnership with the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) to destroy more than 25 years of market development and consumer demand building by the Beef Checkoff Program.

Specifically, OCM announced that it will file a lawsuit seeking an injunction against the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Marketing Service, Cattlemen’s Beef Board and the Beef Promotion Operating Committee. OCM President and Director Fred Stokes stated during the press briefing that HSUS is helping fund its efforts to file the lawsuit. OCM claims to advocate for a fair, competitive agricultural marketplace; however, in doing so it partnered with an organization known for its anti-agriculture agenda. According to Alexander, independent research shows the beef checkoff is supported by nearly 75% of cattlemen and women.

“HSUS is an organization going state by state vowing to end production agriculture by outlawing scientifically validated production practices in animal agriculture.… Continue reading

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August 10th USDA supply and demand report

By Doug Tenney, Leist Mercantile

Below are comments from Doug Tenney on the August 10, 2012 USDA Supply and Demand Report

There were no major surprises with this report. However, producers need to be concerned where grains close at 3 pm today. The last thing you want to see would be lower prices following a neutral to slightly friendly report.

Today USDA released their monthly supply and demand report. They estimated the US corn crop at 10.779 billion bushels with a yield of 123.4 bushels per acre. Earlier in the week traders had estimated that the corn production would be 11.026 billion bushels with a yield of 127.3 bushels per acre. Last month they had pegged corn production at 12.97 billion bushels and a yield of 146 bushels per acre.

Soybean production was estimated at 2.692 billion bushels with a yield at 36.1 bushels per acre. Trader estimates prior to the report had estimated production of 2.817 billion bushels with a yield of 37.8 bushels per acre.… Continue reading

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Will the drought trigger ACRE payments?

By Chris Bruynis, PhD, Assistant Professor & Extension Educator, OSU Extension.

Those farmers that signed up for the Average Crop Revenue Election created in the previous Farm Bill, are wondering if there might be a payment in 2012. The program was set up with both state and farm level revenue triggers that were based on the five year Olympic average and the previous two year average price for each commodity.  Since the state trigger needs to be met before the farm trigger, an examination on the revenue levels and the possibility of falling below these will be discussed first.

The Ohio five year Olympic average yield for corn and soybeans are 157 bushels and 48 bushels respectively. The two year average market price currently is projected at $5.69 for corn and $11.85 for soybeans.  Both crops probably will increase slightly in price, but because of the 10% cap rules in the legislation the state revenue trigger will be capped for both crops well below the calculated revenue levels. … Continue reading

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Why aren’t rains stopping spider mites?

By Ron Hammond and Andy Michel, OSU Extension

The question is being asked why the rains aren’t stopping the mites, which would actually be from a fungal pathogen that can decimate the mite populations under wetter and more humid conditions.

Although rainfall reduces risk of damaging spider mite populations, thunderstorms alone will not eliminate infestations, particularly when rain arrives after large mite populations are established and when rain is followed by dry, hot conditions.  Sources in other states’ newsletters suggest that the mite-killing fungus requires temperatures cooler than 85°F, with 90% relative humidity, to produce infective spores. Periods of at least 12-24 hours of relatively cool, moist, and humid conditions are necessary for the fungal pathogen disperse and infect a spider mite population in a field. In “normal” years, these are conditions we often see in mid-August. So although we are expecting these conditions in the near future, we still urge growers to monitor their fields and spray if the mites are alive and actively feeding.… Continue reading

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Why aren't rains stopping spider mites?

By Ron Hammond and Andy Michel, OSU Extension

The question is being asked why the rains aren’t stopping the mites, which would actually be from a fungal pathogen that can decimate the mite populations under wetter and more humid conditions.

Although rainfall reduces risk of damaging spider mite populations, thunderstorms alone will not eliminate infestations, particularly when rain arrives after large mite populations are established and when rain is followed by dry, hot conditions.  Sources in other states’ newsletters suggest that the mite-killing fungus requires temperatures cooler than 85°F, with 90% relative humidity, to produce infective spores. Periods of at least 12-24 hours of relatively cool, moist, and humid conditions are necessary for the fungal pathogen disperse and infect a spider mite population in a field. In “normal” years, these are conditions we often see in mid-August. So although we are expecting these conditions in the near future, we still urge growers to monitor their fields and spray if the mites are alive and actively feeding.… Continue reading

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Fungicides can do little for drought stressed soybeans

Applying fungicides to soybeans free of foliar disease problems isn’t likely to help alleviate drought stress and could contribute to fungicide-resistant diseases, says a Purdue Extension plant pathologist.

Soybean growers probably are feeling pressure to apply fungicides as the crop enters the R3 growth stage, regardless of disease presence, based on claims that the products can reduce drought stress, increase photosynthesis and, ultimately, increase yields.

But a series of Purdue University research trials has been unable to confirm those claims.

“We’ve done research on fungicides in the absence of disease for several years now at Purdue. What we’ve found is that when we don’t have disease pressure there – foliar diseases such as frogeye leaf spot or Cercospora leaf blight — we don’t often see an economic benefit from a fungicide application,” Kiersten Wise said. “We know that with soybean prices what they are, that benefit would be something to really capitalize on this year.… Continue reading

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Expiring patents create challenges for seed industry

By Matt Reese

It will not be long before the first Roundup Ready soybeans will lose patent protection in 2014 and farmers will need to remember a few things when that happens.

First, just because the Roundup Ready patent has expired, it does not necessarily mean that the seed can legally be saved for replanting to following year.

“That is the first technology trait that is coming off patent, but it is not the last. One thing soybean farmers need to realize is that they are buying a technology trait and they are also likely buying a genetic trait. Those are controlled by separate patents,” said Rob Joslin, with the American Soybean Association. “They may not be able to keep the seed in 2015 even though the patent has expired. They need to be aware of that and check with their seed provider if they are going to keep seed back.”… Continue reading

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Another look at a challenging 2012

By Kevin Cool, Beck’s Hybrids Seed Advisor, CCA

To say that 2012 has been challenging would be an understatement. As we get deeper into August it is becoming clearer how the hot and dry weather has affected the crops. You have probably read or heard a lot about the effects of heat and drought on corn pollination. Even with hot and dry weather early in the growing season if weather conditions during and around pollination are near normal, close to average yields can still be obtained. This is why when corn was knee high and we were dry, I felt we could still have a good year. The most critical time would be at pollination.

Unfortunately for many of us, the drought has persisted not only through pollination, but beyond. Just as equally, if not more

important, is that extreme heat has come along with it. During pollination many of us were breaking temperature records with ease.… Continue reading

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Drought leaving alfalfa quantity concerns

By Ty Higgins, Ohio Ag Net

Licking County livestock producer Popeye Thompson is doing double takes when he looks at the calendar. Thompson knows from his decades of experience that it is never a promising scenario to start feeding alfalfa in July, but that is exactly what happened, not only on Thompson’s Alexandria farm, but on hundreds of other farms all over Ohio as well.

“Things have deteriorated faster than I thought they ever could,” Thompson said. “Until we get a decent amount of rain, I will have to continue to supplement some of my hay, and hope that I can keep enough stored when I need it the most this winter.”

Generally this time of year, Thompson has a successful grazing plan in place. He rotates his cattle on two different pastures every three weeks. The extreme heat and lack of rain, though, changed that philosophy in quick fashion after drought

conditions set in this year.… Continue reading

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Between the Rows-August 6, 2012

Getting Ready  for Harvest

“We’re getting ready for harvest. Things are at a standstill right now. No spraying needs done and we’re just getting everything ready to roll. I would say we’ll get started with harvest in about a month. If you get down around Circleville on the gravel ground, they may start harvest in a couple of weeks. The corn plants were dying, but that little bit of rain helped them to green back up a bit. I don’t know if it will help yield any.

“I’m hoping for corn around 120 bushels. I’ve done some ear counts and there are some decent sized ears and some plants with no ears on them and some plants with nubbins on them. It is really hard to tell.

“If I can hit 120 bushels with $7 or $8 corn we’re talking about the same amount of money or more per acre as 200 bushels at $4.… Continue reading

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Drought reducing soybean size

By Laura Lindsey, OSU Extension soybean specialist

The effect of drought during the early stages of soybean reproduction was discussed in a previous C.O.R.N. newsletter article (click here).  As soybeans enter the seed filling stage, how does drought influence seed size?  On average, there are 2,500 individual soybean seeds per pound.  Soybean seeds produced during drought conditions and at high temperatures tend to be smaller than seeds produced under normal conditions.  Smaller seed size means it takes more individual seeds to equal one pound.  When soybeans were grown in a greenhouse at 84°F, seeds produced under moderate water stress were 8% smaller than seeds produced with adequate water (Dornbos and Mullen, 1991).  When the temperature was raised to 95°F, seeds produced under moderate water stress were 29% smaller than seeds produced with adequate water.  This study indicates that seed size is reduced more when water and heat stress occur simultaneously compared to water stress alone.… Continue reading

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Sale of Champions Results

For more photos, please visit our Sale of Champions Photo Gallery.

Dairy

The Grand Champion Swiss Cheese, produced by Guggisberg Cheese Co., sold for a record-setting $18,000 to Kroger, American Dairy Association Mideast, Westfield Insurance AgriBusiness Division, COBA/Select Sires Inc., DHI Cooperative Inc., ABS Global, Dairymen’s, Brewster Dairy Inc., Maryland & Virginia Milk Producers Cooperative, John and Suzann Spreng of LongAcre Farms, Biery Cheese Co., and Dairy Farmers of America to support the grand champion dairy exhibitors Lane Greiwe, Logan County; Braxton Perry, Champaign County; Becky Cooley, Fairfield County; Anna Miley, Wayne County; Jacob Morgan, Champaign County; and Jacob Baker, Columbiana County; and the dairy supreme showman winners, Tanner Topp of Wayne County and Amber Dietz of Trumbull County.

Market Turkey

Paydon Gingerich of Holmes County exhibited the Grand Champion Turkey, which sold for $11,500 to Cooper Farms, setting a new record.

Market Goats

Jordan Fledderjohann, Shelby County, exhibited the Grand Champion Market Goat, which sold for a record-setting $12,750 to Ohio Harness Racing Association and Scioto Downs.… Continue reading

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High dollar insurance claims may include new requirements

By Matt Reese

There are a number of things to remember with regard to crop insurance that, due to the magnitude of the problem and higher crop prices this year, may impact more farmers than in past.

“Claim audit thresholds will affect a lot of you that maybe haven’t been affected in past. If you have a $200,000 claim or higher, there is a required automatic three-year Actual Production History (APH) review. That is not something that has

to be done before harvest, but you have to prove yield for last three years,” said Ryan Fennig, a crop insurance agent with Fennig-Homan Agribusiness in Celina. “More and more farmers are holding grain over from one year to the next and these three-year APH reviews can be tough.”

In the case of revenue coverage that bases income guarantees on both spring and fall prices, some initial payments may be made early based upon the spring prices.… Continue reading

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Drought could be disastrous for livestock industry

Drought that is spreading across the country is increasing feed prices and quickly spelling financial disaster for livestock producers, Purdue Extension agricultural economist Chris Hurt said.

While crop producers face serious economic losses from reduced or non-existent yields, the lack of corn, soybean and hay crops could make the fallout even worse for milk, beef, pork, lamb, chicken, egg, turkey and duck producers.

“The first thought is crop producers will bear the brunt of the financial losses, but losses in animal industries will be enormous over the next year — perhaps considerably greater than for the crop sector,” Hurt said.

Unlike many crop farmers, livestock producers don’t typically have any form of income protection comparable to crop insurance. December 2012 corn futures already have risen by nearly 55%, and soybean meal futures are up 24%.

“These higher feed prices have to be absorbed by the animal industry, causing a collapse in financial margins,” Hurt said.… Continue reading

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Silage and crop insurance

By Matt Reese

Tom Schmitmeyer looks over the corn crop growing on his Mercer County farm as storm clouds darken the skies but once again fail to drop any rain until they move a couple of miles away. The farm sits on the fringe of the most drought stricken parts of the state.

Like many farms in the area, much of Schmitmeyer’s crop is grown to feed his livestock. The 100 cows he is milking need fed whether his silage crop yields well or not. In his case, Schmitmeyer still has hay and silage reserves from last year and plans on chopping more than usual this year to make sure his cows have plenty of feed.

“I can usually get by with about 60 acres of corn silage, but I may need to double acreage this year,” he said. “The hay crop has yielded about half of what we normally get, but I still have hay left from last year.”… Continue reading

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