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Pork outlook back in black

Stronger hog prices and lower feed costs have put the pork outlook back into the black for the coming year, says a Purdue Extension agricultural economist. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Hogs and Pigs report, there has been little increase in the country’s breeding herd.

With growing demand and a fairly stable-sized breeding herd, producers can expect to return to profitability in the next 12 months. The USDA also reported in its September Grain Stocks report that corn inventories now are higher than expected, reducing the cost of feed.



“Pork producers have largely settled for the status quo because of the uncertainty over feed prices,” said Chris Hurt. “As a result, the USDA says the breeding herd has expanded only slightly as producers awaited the corn and soybean yield and price outcomes of the 2011 growing season.”



According to the USDA, the breeding herd increased 0.6% nationwide in the last year.… Continue reading

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Ohio prevented planting wheat deadlines

The problems of the late planting season have been compounded by the cool damp September and the resulting harvest delays will likely result in challenges getting wheat planted on a timely basis this fall.

By Oct. 9, Ohio’s winter wheat was only 5% planted, 47 percentage points behind last year and 36 points behind the five-year average. As farmers face another round of showers on already soggy soils, it could be pushed back even further.

Farmers in Ohio who are prevented from planting wheat because of a natural disaster, must report the acreage to the Farm Service Agency (FSA) within 15 calendar days after the final planting date.  Ohio has 2 different deadline dates, either Oct. 20, 2011 or Oct. 31, 2011 depending on which county you farm in.

Producers that farm in 25 counties in Ohio, have until the final planting date of Oct. 31, 2011 to timely plant fall wheat. … Continue reading

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Use care when making hybrid decisions this fall

Though growers can use harvest data to make decisions for next year’s seed corn, a Purdue Extension corn specialist says they should look at a variety of field conditions before deciding on hybrids.

This year’s crop experienced water stress on both ends of the spectrum with flooding in the early spring and drought in late summer. Bob Nielsen said those conditions may not lead to a balanced view of hybrid performance.

“We all want to take those mental notes as we’re harvesting, but it’s important to be cautious about over-reacting,” he said. “Hybrid performance in a single field, good or bad, is only a single snapshot of its potential.”

Nielsen said the top criterion for hybrid selection always is yield potential, but consistency of yield also is important.

“Acceptable hybrids for your farm are those that exhibit high yields over a wide variety of growing conditions,” he said. “The hybrid doesn’t have to win every trial, but it should be near the top of all of them.”… Continue reading

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Don't forget to plan fertility during harvest

By Brian Essinger, DeKalb/Asgrow Territory Manager

I know we are in the middle of harvest, but with soybeans coming off you are beginning to make fertility decisions right now.

Here are a few tips and guidelines to make sure you are not shorting yourselves and put enough fertilizer on for maximum yields in 2012. Yields are better than expected in many places throughout Ohio and that means more nutrients were removed from the soil. Your fertility decisions this fall will impact your yield in 2012. Do not short yourself.

1.   Fertilize every field every year no matter which crop you are rotating to or which crop you just harvested. I am going to give you information on the big three macro nutrients, but we are seeing more micronutrient deficiencies each year. Check with your retailer on how to cover your Macro and Micro needs.

2.   Variable rate is the most profitable, efficient, and economical method because it gets what you need where you want it.… Continue reading

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Don’t forget to plan fertility during harvest

By Brian Essinger, DeKalb/Asgrow Territory Manager

I know we are in the middle of harvest, but with soybeans coming off you are beginning to make fertility decisions right now.

Here are a few tips and guidelines to make sure you are not shorting yourselves and put enough fertilizer on for maximum yields in 2012. Yields are better than expected in many places throughout Ohio and that means more nutrients were removed from the soil. Your fertility decisions this fall will impact your yield in 2012. Do not short yourself.

1.   Fertilize every field every year no matter which crop you are rotating to or which crop you just harvested. I am going to give you information on the big three macro nutrients, but we are seeing more micronutrient deficiencies each year. Check with your retailer on how to cover your Macro and Micro needs.

2.   Variable rate is the most profitable, efficient, and economical method because it gets what you need where you want it.… Continue reading

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Congress approves free trade agreements

 

Much of the agricultural sector praised the passage of the free trade agreements in the House and Senate. The White House transmitted the FTAs with Korea, Colombia and Panama to Congress last week.

 

Ohio Sen. Rob Portman, as well as Ohio House Reps. Austria, Chabot, Gibbs, Johnson, Jordan, Latta, Renacci, Schmidt, Stivers, Tiberi and Turner voted in favor of the trade agreements. 


 

“This legislation provides Ohio grain, in turn, Ohio farmers, with significant market export opportunities,” said Tadd Nicholson, Ohio Corn and Wheat Growers Association interim CEO and director of government and industry affairs. “Our corn and wheat growers can more effectively compete on the international trade market.”

 

The fiscal returns from the successful passage of the FTAs will also help offset the federal deficit to propel the nation for economic growth. Statistics show that the FTAs have the potential to create 250,000 American jobs and to add an additional $13 billion annually in exports.… Continue reading

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Prices respond to October Crop Report

On Oct.12, USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service forecast corn production at 12.4 billion bushels, down 1% from the September forecast and down slightly from the 2010 production estimate in the Crop Report.

If realized, this will be the fourth largest production total on record for the United States. Based on conditions as of Oct. 1, yields are expected to average 148.1 bushels per acre, unchanged from the September forecast but down 4.7 bushels from 2010. If realized, this will be the lowest average yield since 2005. Area harvested for grain is forecast at 83.9 million acres, down 1% from the September forecast. Acreage updates were made in several states based on administrative data.

“The October 12 crop report yielded few surprises, ending for a short time speculation about the size of the U.S. corn and soybean crops. In recent days the trade has been lowering their ideas of the U.S.… Continue reading

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Yield Reports from Across Ohio

Soybeans

County: Union
Yield: 60
Moisture: 14%
Variety: Asgrow 3431s

County: Crawford
Yield:62
Moisture: 11%

County: Darke
Yield: in the 50’s
Moisture: 10%

County: Wayne
Yield: 62-77
Moisture: 13%-17%

Corn

County: Marion
Yield: 260/dry
Moisture: 22%
Hybrid: Agri Gold 6533VT3

 

County: Muskingum
Yield: 275
Moisture: 24%
Hybrid: Monsanto DKC 61-21

County: Crawford
Yield: 217
Hybrid: AgriGold A6389VT3   

County: Clark
Yield: 155
Moisture: 22
Hybrid: Agri Gold 6533 vt3

County: Delaware
Yield: 256
Moisture: 15%

County: Delaware
Yield: 220
Moisture: 22%

County: Wayne
Yield: 201-251
Moisture: 21%-27%

 

 

 

 

 

 

I also received a report yesterday of Asgrow 3431s averaging 60 bu/acre with moisture of 14% in Raymond(Union County)… Continue reading

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Re-examining corn stocks

Although the USDA’s estimate of the Sept. 1, 2011 inventory of old-crop corn is old news, there are ongoing questions surrounding the quarterly stocks estimates. For corn, quarterly stocks estimates have not been well anticipated since June 2010, said a University of Illinois agricultural economist.

“The June 1, 2010 estimate of stocks was surprisingly small and implied feed and residual use during the previous quarter that was too large. The Sept. 1, 2010 estimate of stocks was larger than anticipated based on the level of June 1 stocks but seemed to ‘correct’ for the small estimate in June. The implied feed and residual use for the 2010-11 marketing year based on that estimate was reasonable,” said Darrel Good.

The Dec. 1, 2010 and March 1, 2011 estimates of stocks were marginally smaller than expected and implied a high rate of feed and residual use during the first half of the marketing year, 8% above that of the previous year, he said.… Continue reading

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Between the Rows-October 10, 2011

“We got behind on GDDs in September when it was so cool, but we have caught up with the 30-year average with the warm weather and it has really moved the crop along. We just started chopping silage about an hour ago. That is the first we’ve chopped silage because the fields were wet. We should’ve been chopping silage three or four days ago, but the corn is not pulling the moisture out and the fields are staying wet. We’re a good month late on the silage.

“The rest of the corn maturity is moving along fast. There are a lot of ear molds on the tips and there are some leaf blights from all of this rain we had in the last month, but the silage looks good so far.

“The last week really moved the soybeans along, and we’re going to start harvest today. There has been quite a bit of progress over the weekend on beans in the area.… Continue reading

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Trade agreements move to the Senate

On Monday, Oct. 3, President Obama submitted the three pending trade agreements with Colombia, Korea and Panama to Congress for consideration. The House of Representatives quickly took action on the submission with the Ways and Means Committee holding a mark-up on the agreements and passing them from committee. The House and Senate are expected to vote on U.S. free trade agreements (FTAs) with Colombia, Panama, and South Korea on Wednesday, Oct. 12.

The three trade agreements will be part of a package that includes Trade Adjustment Assistance. The Ohio Farm Bureau, the American Soybean Association, the National Corn Growers Association, the National Pork Producers Council, the Ohio Corn and Wheat Growers Association and other groups support the Colombia, Korea and Panama trade agreements and Trade Adjustment Assistance and are encouraging members to call their Senators.

“The extreme value of the export market cannot be exaggerated,” said Tadd Nicholson, Ohio Corn and Wheat Growers Association interim CEO and director of government and industry affairs.… Continue reading

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Precision diets can boost profits

Dairy producers shouldn’t get used to $7 corn, and should tailor diets to maximize productivity and profitability, an Ohio State University Extension expert says.

“There are two things to manage: feed costs and milk prices,” said Extension dairy specialist Normand St-Pierre. “On the feed cost side, there is nothing that says you have to feed corn and soybeans because ruminants, and dairy cows in particular, can take advantage of a wide variety of feeds.”

St-Pierre said producers could save as much as 50 cents per cow per day by adopting other feedstuffs in a more focused nutritional strategy. He offered several recommendations for alternative feedstuffs in the Buckeye Dairy Newsletter.

As to the income side of the ledger, St-Pierre said producers do not need to sit on the sidelines and grouse about the high cost of corn.

“We have a relatively highly regulated market,” he said. “Since the late ’90s, producers have sold milk on component pricing, where each of these components is priced separately.… Continue reading

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Stay safe around bins and equipment

Farmers can take steps during harvest season to avoid accidents in grains bins, a Purdue Extension farm safety expert says.

In years like this one when growers may have planted late and had to harvest grain at earlier maturity, low quality grain will translate into spending more time in and around grain bins to check temperatures and moisture content. More time in bins leaves more potential for entrapments. But according to Steve Wettschurack, up to 90% of grain entrapments could be eliminated if farmers did not work alone or enter grain bins when unloading augers are running.

“With a 12-inch auger, it only takes 15 seconds to be in up to your waist, 30 seconds for the grain to be over your head, and within one minute you can be 6 feet under the surface,” he said. “It’s nearly physically impossible to get out in time, and digging around when trapped causes more grain to flow down.”… Continue reading

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Every year’s a good for apples, but some tougher than others

By Matt Reese

Anyone who grows anything outdoors was painfully familiar with the wet conditions this spring. The almost constant rain made it tough to get anything done outside. The same soggy conditions that made this spring miserable for humans made productivity even more challenging for the insect pollinators dodging drops while trying to perform their daily tasks. Soggy bees led to lackluster pollination season for Fred Finney’s apple crop on Moreland Fruit Farm in Wayne County. “It just kept raining and the bees weren’t out pollinating,” he said. To worsen the situation, there was a nasty outbreak of fire blight in the orchard. “We had a tremendous strike of fire blight. Moisture and cool weather favor it. Other places had it around Ohio, but it is not widespread,” Finney said. “There is a preventative spray for it, but I don’t know how well it works. The fruit near the fire blight is ruined.… Continue reading

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Every year's a good for apples, but some tougher than others

By Matt Reese

Anyone who grows anything outdoors was painfully familiar with the wet conditions this spring. The almost constant rain made it tough to get anything done outside. The same soggy conditions that made this spring miserable for humans made productivity even more challenging for the insect pollinators dodging drops while trying to perform their daily tasks. Soggy bees led to lackluster pollination season for Fred Finney’s apple crop on Moreland Fruit Farm in Wayne County. “It just kept raining and the bees weren’t out pollinating,” he said. To worsen the situation, there was a nasty outbreak of fire blight in the orchard. “We had a tremendous strike of fire blight. Moisture and cool weather favor it. Other places had it around Ohio, but it is not widespread,” Finney said. “There is a preventative spray for it, but I don’t know how well it works. The fruit near the fire blight is ruined.… Continue reading

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Fall cutting hay issues

By Mark Sulc, Ohio State University Extension forage specialist

The recent damp weather has prevented a timely last cutting of hay across much of Ohio. So is it safe to cut a hay stand now? The answer depends on how much alfalfa and red clover is in the stand, how important it is to you to keep the legumes in that stand, and how badly you need or want the extra hay. For pure grass stands, fall cutting concerns are much less of an issue.

Cutting tall legumes like alfalfa and red clover between now and mid-October will carry some risk to the health of the stand. Legume plants are actively storing energy reserves in the taproots during this fall period that are used for winter survival and re-growth next spring. Cutting now will interrupt that storage process because the plant will use reserves for late fall regrowth, and there won’t be enough time to replenish them before a killing frost.… Continue reading

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Time is running out to plant wheat

As corn and soybean harvest extends into the later weeks of harvest, the optimal window for planting winter wheat in the Eastern Corn Belt is rapidly closing according to Ohio State Extension wheat researcher Pierce Paul.

“Our target is always to get the wheat planted before the second week of October, basically within the first two weeks after the fly-free date,” said Paul, a plant pathologist. “That puts us next Monday as the climax of the optimal dates for the northern portion of the state. I’m concerned, and I’ll be even more concerned if we don’t have our wheat in by next Friday.”

Paul said the next week and a half are especially critical for planting winter wheat in the optimal window. The concept is for farmers to plant wheat early enough in the season to allow adequate plant development prior to winter, but late enough to minimize problems with insect and diseases

The Hessin Fly free date in Ohio ranges from Sept.… Continue reading

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Ear molds could be a concern

The combination of a late harvest and wet weather could mean optimal conditions for development of corn ear molds, according to Ohio State University Extenson plant pathologist Pierce Paul.

Paul, a leading researcher of disease issues in corn and wheat at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC), said the longer corn stands in the field under wet conditions, the higher the risk that molds will develop.

“We’ve still got fields of corn in several locations that have not yet hit black layer, or physiological maturity,” Paul said. “Typically we’d be drying down and close to harvest at this point.”

The big concern with ear molds is the potential development of mycotoxins, namely vomitoxin, also referred to as deoxynivalenol (DON). DON is often associated with reduced feed intake and performance issues in livestock, especially swine, Paul said.

He recommended farmers scout fields aggressively heading into harvest to assess conditions and evaluate options.… Continue reading

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Pork outlook brightening

Finally pork producers have some positive news that has increased optimism for greater profitability in the coming year, said a Purdue University agricultural economist.

“That good news came from USDA in two forms. The first was the September Hogs and Pigs report, which indicated little change in the size of the breeding herd. The second was the feed-price lowering impacts of higher-than-expected corn inventories revealed in the September Grain Stocks report,” said Chris Hurt.

The combination of stronger hog prices and lower feed prices has put the pork outlook back into solid black for the coming year, he said. Pork producers have largely settled for the status quo because of the uncertainty over feed prices. As a result, USDA says the breeding herd has expanded only slightly as producers awaited the corn and soybean yield and price outcomes of the troubled 2011 growing season, he said.

“USDA indicated that the breeding herd has increased just 0.6% over the past year.… Continue reading

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Corn dry-down slow going

By Peter Thomison, Ohio State University Extension corn specialist

Recent wet, cool weather slowed drydown.  By early to mid‑October, dry-down rates will usually drop to 1/2-3/4% per day (from rates of up to 1% per day in September when drying conditions are usually more favorable). By late October to early November, field dry‑down rates will usually drop to 1/4-1/2% per day and by mid November, probably 0-1/4% per day. By late November, drying rates will be negligible.

Estimating dry‑down rates can also be considered in terms of Growing Degree Days (GDDs). Generally, it takes 30 GDDs to lower grain moisture each point from 30% down to 25%. Drying from 25-20% requires about 45 GDDs per point of moisture. In October, we accumulate about 5-10 GDDs per day. However, note that the above estimates are based on generalizations, and it is likely that some hybrids vary from this pattern of drydown.

Past Ohio research evaluating corn drydown provides insight on effects of weather conditions on grain drying.… Continue reading

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