Search Results for: No days off

End of harvest fast approaching

An early-week storm system and weekend snow hampered corn harvest progress as farmers pushed towards the season’s close, according to Ben Torrance, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 2 percent very short, 24 percent short, 64 percent adequate, and 10 percent surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending on November 26 was 38.3 degrees, 1.2 degrees below normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 0.78 inches of precipitation, 0.02 inches above average. There were 4.0 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending November 26.

Corn harvest was delayed in northern tier counties as producers waited for space to become available at grain elevators. Tar spot and vomitoxin posed concerns for some farmers in northwestern counties. Eighty-six percent of corn for grain was harvested. The moisture content of corn grain at harvest was 19 percent, down one point from last week. Winter wheat condition was 80 percent good to excellent, down 4 points from the previous week.… Continue reading

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A look at bale grazing

By Christine Gelley, Ohio State University Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator, Noble County

Extending the grazing season is one of the best ways to save money on feed and reduce labor on the farm. In order to add grazing days to the calendar, farm managers must approach grazing with a plan and the willingness to be flexible. Rotationally grazing, utilizing multiple forage species and growing seasons, being thoughtful about stocking rates, adding fertility when needed, and having plentiful fence and water will increase chances for success.

Whether you have the ability to graze for a couple extra weeks or a couple extra months, the benefits of preparation will show up in the money you save on harvesting or purchasing supplemental feed. Regardless of how diligent you are about your grazing plans, it is difficult to provide sufficient grazing for livestock 365 days a year in Ohio and eventually you’ll be relying on stored feeds to meet the needs of your livestock.… Continue reading

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“Christmas Tree Ship” tradition returns

By Dan Armitage, Buckeye Sportsman

As in days of old in many Great Lakes ports, Christmas trees will in Toledo by boat on Saturday, Dec. 2, when The National Museum of the Great Lakes, in partnership with Geo. Gradel Co., invites folks to join a holiday tradition by welcoming back the “Christmas Tree Ship.” And thanks to the generosity of The University of Toledo Medical Center (UTMC), museum admission will be free for all on that Merry Saturday.

Here’s the backstory: on Nov. 23, 1912, the schooner Rouse Simmons sank in Lake Michigan while carrying Christmas trees, a popular way to transport the holiday trees at the time. Remembered as the Christmas Tree Ship, her captain, Herman E. Schuenemann, was known for giving trees to families in need. The story provides the inspiration behind the Museum’s community giveback event encouraging individuals to make a memory to last a lifetime by watching Santa arrive at the museum’s dock delivering Christmas Trees and holiday support.… Continue reading

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Using futures in a hedge account versus HTAs

By Jon Scheve, Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC 

Brazil’s weather caused some excitement in the bean market last week. One day forecasts showed no rain, and the next it did. Until late January, farmers should expect South America’s weather forecasts to have a big impact on prices. 

Unfortunately, corn hit a new calendar low this week at $4.61. While Brazil weather issues could still help corn prices, the estimated 2+ billion-bushel carryout will be hard to overcome without a big increase in export demand. 

Hedging grain — Using futures in a hedge account verses HTAs

I am often asked why I hedge my grain using a futures account instead of using HTA (Hedge To Arrive) contracts with an end user. Following are some of the pros and cons. 

Setting up a futures hedging account

This is a one time “hoop” hedgers using futures must do that selling an HTA does not require. Including a hedge line with a bank to finance the hedge account is also a good idea. … Continue reading

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Corn harvest advances

Farmers took advantage of last week’s fair weather, making steady progress towards harvest completion, according to Ben Torrance, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 2 percent very short, 20 percent short, 73 percent adequate, and 5 percent surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending on November 19 was 44.9 degrees, 3.7 degrees above normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 0.58 inches of precipitation, 0.01 inches below average. There were 5.4 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending November 19.

Last week’s field activities included corn harvesting, lime application and fall tillage. Eighty-one percent of corn was harvested. The moisture content of corn grain at harvest was 20 percent, unchanged from last week. Winter wheat was 95 percent emerged. Winter wheat condition was 84 percent good to excellent, down slightly from the previous week.

Click here to read the full report from USDA.Continue reading

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Ohio National brought almost 11,000 birds to Columbus

By Matt Reese

California, Montana, Texas, Connecticut — vehicle license plates in the parking lot at the Ohio Expo Center were nearly as diverse as the poultry competing at Ohio National poultry show the second weekend of November. It was wall-to-wall feathers and a cacophony of bird calls in the Voinovich and O’Neill buildings at the nation’s largest poultry show.

“This is the Quarter Horse Congress of chicken shows. If you want to come to a good chicken show, then come to the Ohio National. There are almost 11,000 birds here and over 900 exhibitors from all over the country and Canada,” said Tim Johnson from Wood County, president of the Ohio Poultry Breeders Association (OPBA). “There are hundreds of breeds and varieties of chickens, ducks, geese, turkeys — if it’s got feathers and two legs, we’ve got it. And if you’re going to show something here, you’ve got to show something that’s good.”… Continue reading

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Seneca East FFA members excel at State competition

By Morgan Anderson, OCJ FFA reporter

As the age-old saying goes, “Winning isn’t everything,” but for the Seneca East FFA Chapter, their hard work certainly paid off. On Oct. 14, four FFA members competed in the State Agricultural Soils Career Development Event (CDE), and to their surprise, they came home as state champions.

“To be a state champion in the Agricultural Soils CDE still seems unreal,” Ella Martin said. “When I first looked at the results, I didn’t even believe what I saw. I was sure they had messed up and something was going to change. Being on a champion team is something I hope everyone gets to do. To be on a team and become close with my teammates is a bond and experience that I will never take for granted. I wouldn’t have wanted to experience this with another group of people, and I am so grateful for this opportunity.”… Continue reading

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A look at yields as the smoke clears for 2023

By Matt Reese

From the driest spring weather on record for some areas to some record-setting wheat, corn and soybean yields for farms, the 2023 growing season had its share of ups and downs statewide. There was no shortage of coffee shop conversation fodder with a number of agricultural oddities from the year, but it seems the most discussion, questioning, theorizing, and speculating in 2023 revolved around the hazy, smoggy stretch of days due to the smoke from the Canadian wildfires. 

At the time, many farmers had concerns yields were being limited by the filtered sunlight through the smoke, but with some high yielding crops around the state, many are now speculating that the smoke could have somehow improved yields. 

There were three major stretches of wildfire smoke in Ohio: June 6 and 7, June 27 through 29, and July 16 and 17. There were several other smoky sky days of less intensity throughout the two-month period as well.… Continue reading

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Soybean harvest nears completion, plenty of corn left

Favorable weather supported substantial row crop harvest progress last week, according to Ben Torrance, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 1 percent very short, 22 percent short, 73 percent adequate, and 4 percent surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending on November 12 was 48.7 degrees, 5.8 degrees above normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 0.10 inches of precipitation, 0.68 inches below average. There were 6.0 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending November 12.

Last week’s field activities included fertilizer application, lime spreading, and fall tillage. Farmers reported that high corn moisture content continued to slow corn harvest progress in western counties. Sixty-eight percent of corn was harvested and the moisture content of corn grain at harvest was 20 percent. Ninety-five percent of soybeans were harvested and the moisture content of soybeans at harvest was 13 percent. Winter wheat was 90 percent emerged.… Continue reading

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Corn-to-Go

Managing manure application when STP >50

By Greg LaBarge

I often get questions about managing manure applications in fields where Soil Test P (STP) is above the maintenance limit of 50 parts per million (ppm) in the Tri-State Fertilizer Recommendations for Corn, Soybean, Wheat, and Alfalfa, Bulletin 974. Be aware that the Tri-State Fertilizer Recommendations provide recommendations for the economical use of purchased fertilizer. The 50 ppm maintenance limit is the STP level where “no agronomic response, either higher yield or benefit of a higher STP, results from added fertilizer.” The Tri-State Fertilizer Recommendations only address crop agronomic needs, not P’s environmental impact. If you need to apply manure to a field with STP greater than 50 PPM, how can it be done to limit field P loss?

The publication Assessing Nutrient Loss Risk in Ohio, NRCS, 2020 provides environmental P loss criteria based on the STP in a field.… Continue reading

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Corn harvest behind 5-year average

After a round of precipitation and overnight freezes early last week, the row crop harvest progressed steadily, according to Ben Torrance, State Statistician, USDA NASS,Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 19% short, 67% adequate, and 14% surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending on November 5 was 43.0 degrees, 5.7 degrees below normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 0.56 inches of precipitation, 0.16 inches below average. There were 4.6
days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending November 5.

Though corn moisture content remained higher than average, the corn harvest’s pace accelerated last week. Farmers in northern tier counties reported instances of cob rot, mold, and sprouting in harvested grain. 45% of corn was harvested and the moisture content of corn grain at harvest was 22%. Eighty-nine percent of soybeans were harvested and the moisture content of soybeans at harvest was 13%. Corn condition was 87% good to excellent. … Continue reading

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Harvest 2023 is winding down

Lawrence Onweller

It is going slow. The corn planted in May isn’t drying down. It’s still running 24% moisture. The yields are good, but we’re burning through a lot of gas and that part is going slow. The moisture in the corn just doesn’t want to drop, especially the fuller season corn. It just takes a long time to take twice as much moisture out and that’s literally what you’re doing when you’re harvesting 24% corn, you’re taking almost double the amount of moisture out.

With the weather, you’re able to harvest part of the day and then do field work part of the day. We’ve had sprinkles — no large rains in the last couple of weeks — just intermittent rains that haven’t really slowed down harvest. 

We’re seeing a lot of the corn yield in the 220s. That’s really good and the last 3 years it’s been like that.… Continue reading

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Ohio Crop Progress: Soybeans progress, corn delayed

While Ohio’s soybean harvest pushed ahead of its five-year average, poor conditions for dry-down contributed to delayed corn harvest progress, according to Ben Torrance, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 1 percent very short, 26 percent short, 54 percent adequate, and 19 percent surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending on October 29 was 57.6 degrees, 7.4 degrees above normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 0.61 inches of precipitation, 0.15 inches above average. There were 4.5 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending October 29.

Farmers throughout the State reported that corn moisture content remained above ideal levels, slowing harvest. Field activities last week included row crop harvesting, fertilizer application, and tillage. Ninety-five percent of corn was mature, and 29 percent was harvested. The moisture content of corn grain at harvest was 23 percent. Eighty percent of soybeans were harvested. The moisture content of soybeans at harvest was 13 percent.… Continue reading

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Harvest observations to build a better future

By Ryan Klamfoth, Pioneer Field Agronomist

The excitement of harvest is upon us. The view from the combine will provide a front row seat to assess the impacts of the growing season with frequent glances at the yield monitor. The 2023 corn crop has experienced a unique combination of challenges including: low accumulation of growing degree units (GDUs), stretches with no rainfall, plant health issues from diseases such as tar spot, crown rot, anthracnose top die-back, times when low soil moisture limited nutrient uptake, and premature plant death. Recognizing the impact of these challenges is an important step toward better understanding the cause for variable performance that can be expected this year from field to field or even within the same combine pass.

Average heat unit accumulation in many areas of Ohio has been tracking about 5 calendar days behind the 30-year average and 14 days behind the 2022 season. A cool summer has many farmers concerned about shelling wet corn.… Continue reading

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Harvest progresses between storms

Farmers made harvest progress in fields last week between rounds of widespread precipitation, according to Ben Torrance, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 1 percent very short, 22 percent short, 61 percent adequate, and 16 percent surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending on October 22 was 50.7 degrees, 0.2 degrees below normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 0.91 inches of precipitation, 0.23 inches above average. There were 3.4 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending October 22.

While soybean harvest progress remained in line with recentyear trends, corn harvest progress lagged behind last year and the five-year average. Ninety percent of corn was mature and 20 percent was harvested. The moisture content of corn grain at harvest was 24 percent. Corn for silage was 97 percent harvested. Sixty-four percent of soybeans were harvested. The moisture content of soybeans at harvest was 14 percent.… Continue reading

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2023 Feeding Farmers in the Field

By Joel Penhorwood and Dusty Sonnenberg, Ohio Ag Net

Ohio Ag Net was once again Feeding Farmers in the Field this fall with cooperation from 92.1 The Frog, as well as AG Boogher and Son, RRR Tire, Fertilizer Dealer Supply, North Star Hardware & Implement Co., Farm Credit Mid-America, VTF-Sunrise, Homan Inc., and Golden Harvest. The program serves up lunch and prizes to four farms during the busy harvest season in the 92.1 listening area. Each of the farms was kind enough to offer a harvest update and insights into their operation.

King Family of Allen County, Sept. 27

The King Family of Allen County hosted the first week of the 2023 edition of Feeding Farmers in the Field. Andy King of T&D Enterprises farms with his father and uncle and recently bought into the operation.

Andy King in Allen County talked with Joel Penhorwood for the first Feeding Farmers of the fall.
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Harvest turning up strong yields statewide

Lawrence Onweller

We had quite a few rains last week — and around 2 inches in the last 10 days — so there’s still quite a few beans around in the area or at least around my house left to come out of the fields. We have about 200 acres or so to run, which will take about two days.

Corn has been good to really good. The disease and stuff didn’t seem to hurt it much.

The lowest corn yield I’ve heard about is probably 180 and then I heard up to 250 to 260 bushels. If they had a water issue like drowning out, soybean yields of 48 bushels was the lowest I’ve heard on up to the 70s at the high end. That’s been about our range. There were water issues on both sides, too much or too little.

A lot of the corn moisture has depended on the maturity and when it was planted.… Continue reading

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Setting the stage for trade

By Dusty Sonnenberg, CCA

This summer was busy with the efforts of Ohioans in the state and around the world to cultivate relationships and build markets for domestic crop production.

Columbian wheat trade

“Will you continue to grow wheat in Ohio?” That was one of the questions asked by a trade team from Colombia that traveled to Ohio as part of a U.S. Wheat Associates trip in conjunction with the Ohio Corn and Wheat Growers Association and the Ohio Small Grains Checkoff. Members of the trade group represented buyers that purchase 80% of the wheat imported into Colombia. They visited Northwest Ohio in August to see first-hand the quality of this year’s wheat crop and interact with different sectors of Ohio’s wheat industry. The group had the opportunity to tour the Anderson’s in Maumee, Mennel Milling in Fostoria, and Drewes Farms in Custar.

William Morales was one of the members of the Colombian group.… Continue reading

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Cool wet conditions as harvest progresses

Farmers made significant row crop harvest progress ahead of late-week rains, according to Ben Torrance, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 4% very short, 30% short, 61% adequate, and 5% surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending on Oct. 15 was 53.0 degrees, 1.0 degrees below normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 0.65 inches of precipitation, 0.09 inches above average. There were 5.1 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending Oct. 15.

Eighty-six percent of corn was mature, and 17% was harvested. The moisture content of corn at the time of harvest was 26%. Corn for silage was 93% harvested. Ninety-five percent of soybeans were dropping leaves and 49% of soybeans were harvested. The moisture content of soybeans at harvest was 12%. Corn and soybean condition were 87 and 81% good to excellent, respectively. Third cuttings of other dry hay were 87% complete.… Continue reading

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Soybeans make major harvest progress

Farmers took advantage of last week’s warm and dry start to make harvest progress ahead of cool weekend showers, according to Ben Torrance, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 5 percent very short, 43 percent short, 51 percent adequate, and 1 percent surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending on October 8 was 62.7 degrees, 6.5 degrees above normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 0.51 inches of precipitation, 0.16 inches below average. There were 5.4 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending October 8.

Despite relatively high corn moisture levels, farmers made modest harvest progress, though corn harvested for grain remained behind both last year and the 5-year average. White mold raised concerns in some soybean fields in northeastern counties. Ninety-five percent of corn was in or past dent, 63 percent was mature, and 9 percent was harvested for grain. Corn for silage was 88 percent harvested.… Continue reading

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