Search Results for: No days off

Ohio Crop Progress: Soybeans progress, corn delayed

While Ohio’s soybean harvest pushed ahead of its five-year average, poor conditions for dry-down contributed to delayed corn harvest progress, according to Ben Torrance, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 1 percent very short, 26 percent short, 54 percent adequate, and 19 percent surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending on October 29 was 57.6 degrees, 7.4 degrees above normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 0.61 inches of precipitation, 0.15 inches above average. There were 4.5 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending October 29.

Farmers throughout the State reported that corn moisture content remained above ideal levels, slowing harvest. Field activities last week included row crop harvesting, fertilizer application, and tillage. Ninety-five percent of corn was mature, and 29 percent was harvested. The moisture content of corn grain at harvest was 23 percent. Eighty percent of soybeans were harvested. The moisture content of soybeans at harvest was 13 percent.… Continue reading

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Harvest observations to build a better future

By Ryan Klamfoth, Pioneer Field Agronomist

The excitement of harvest is upon us. The view from the combine will provide a front row seat to assess the impacts of the growing season with frequent glances at the yield monitor. The 2023 corn crop has experienced a unique combination of challenges including: low accumulation of growing degree units (GDUs), stretches with no rainfall, plant health issues from diseases such as tar spot, crown rot, anthracnose top die-back, times when low soil moisture limited nutrient uptake, and premature plant death. Recognizing the impact of these challenges is an important step toward better understanding the cause for variable performance that can be expected this year from field to field or even within the same combine pass.

Average heat unit accumulation in many areas of Ohio has been tracking about 5 calendar days behind the 30-year average and 14 days behind the 2022 season. A cool summer has many farmers concerned about shelling wet corn.… Continue reading

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Harvest progresses between storms

Farmers made harvest progress in fields last week between rounds of widespread precipitation, according to Ben Torrance, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 1 percent very short, 22 percent short, 61 percent adequate, and 16 percent surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending on October 22 was 50.7 degrees, 0.2 degrees below normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 0.91 inches of precipitation, 0.23 inches above average. There were 3.4 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending October 22.

While soybean harvest progress remained in line with recentyear trends, corn harvest progress lagged behind last year and the five-year average. Ninety percent of corn was mature and 20 percent was harvested. The moisture content of corn grain at harvest was 24 percent. Corn for silage was 97 percent harvested. Sixty-four percent of soybeans were harvested. The moisture content of soybeans at harvest was 14 percent.… Continue reading

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2023 Feeding Farmers in the Field

By Joel Penhorwood and Dusty Sonnenberg, Ohio Ag Net

Ohio Ag Net was once again Feeding Farmers in the Field this fall with cooperation from 92.1 The Frog, as well as AG Boogher and Son, RRR Tire, Fertilizer Dealer Supply, North Star Hardware & Implement Co., Farm Credit Mid-America, VTF-Sunrise, Homan Inc., and Golden Harvest. The program serves up lunch and prizes to four farms during the busy harvest season in the 92.1 listening area. Each of the farms was kind enough to offer a harvest update and insights into their operation.

King Family of Allen County, Sept. 27

The King Family of Allen County hosted the first week of the 2023 edition of Feeding Farmers in the Field. Andy King of T&D Enterprises farms with his father and uncle and recently bought into the operation.

Andy King in Allen County talked with Joel Penhorwood for the first Feeding Farmers of the fall.
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Harvest turning up strong yields statewide

Lawrence Onweller

We had quite a few rains last week — and around 2 inches in the last 10 days — so there’s still quite a few beans around in the area or at least around my house left to come out of the fields. We have about 200 acres or so to run, which will take about two days.

Corn has been good to really good. The disease and stuff didn’t seem to hurt it much.

The lowest corn yield I’ve heard about is probably 180 and then I heard up to 250 to 260 bushels. If they had a water issue like drowning out, soybean yields of 48 bushels was the lowest I’ve heard on up to the 70s at the high end. That’s been about our range. There were water issues on both sides, too much or too little.

A lot of the corn moisture has depended on the maturity and when it was planted.… Continue reading

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Setting the stage for trade

By Dusty Sonnenberg, CCA

This summer was busy with the efforts of Ohioans in the state and around the world to cultivate relationships and build markets for domestic crop production.

Columbian wheat trade

“Will you continue to grow wheat in Ohio?” That was one of the questions asked by a trade team from Colombia that traveled to Ohio as part of a U.S. Wheat Associates trip in conjunction with the Ohio Corn and Wheat Growers Association and the Ohio Small Grains Checkoff. Members of the trade group represented buyers that purchase 80% of the wheat imported into Colombia. They visited Northwest Ohio in August to see first-hand the quality of this year’s wheat crop and interact with different sectors of Ohio’s wheat industry. The group had the opportunity to tour the Anderson’s in Maumee, Mennel Milling in Fostoria, and Drewes Farms in Custar.

William Morales was one of the members of the Colombian group.… Continue reading

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Cool wet conditions as harvest progresses

Farmers made significant row crop harvest progress ahead of late-week rains, according to Ben Torrance, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 4% very short, 30% short, 61% adequate, and 5% surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending on Oct. 15 was 53.0 degrees, 1.0 degrees below normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 0.65 inches of precipitation, 0.09 inches above average. There were 5.1 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending Oct. 15.

Eighty-six percent of corn was mature, and 17% was harvested. The moisture content of corn at the time of harvest was 26%. Corn for silage was 93% harvested. Ninety-five percent of soybeans were dropping leaves and 49% of soybeans were harvested. The moisture content of soybeans at harvest was 12%. Corn and soybean condition were 87 and 81% good to excellent, respectively. Third cuttings of other dry hay were 87% complete.… Continue reading

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Soybeans make major harvest progress

Farmers took advantage of last week’s warm and dry start to make harvest progress ahead of cool weekend showers, according to Ben Torrance, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 5 percent very short, 43 percent short, 51 percent adequate, and 1 percent surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending on October 8 was 62.7 degrees, 6.5 degrees above normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 0.51 inches of precipitation, 0.16 inches below average. There were 5.4 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending October 8.

Despite relatively high corn moisture levels, farmers made modest harvest progress, though corn harvested for grain remained behind both last year and the 5-year average. White mold raised concerns in some soybean fields in northeastern counties. Ninety-five percent of corn was in or past dent, 63 percent was mature, and 9 percent was harvested for grain. Corn for silage was 88 percent harvested.… Continue reading

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Combines are rolling, but harvest still a bit behind schedule

Lawrence Onweller

Most guys have gotten started by now or are just getting started. The moisture of the corn varies by the maturity or when you planted, like it always does. I’ve been hearing all sorts of different moisture levels coming out of the fields. It’s the same thing with the beans.  

It’s been dry. Even though we’ve been getting intermittent showers, they haven’t amounted to a whole lot. I think we’ve had three in the last week. The rain has been just enough to slow down harvest. When the corn fodder is wet it makes it harder to get that the corn through the combine.

The wheat fields planted in September look really nice. I have not heard of anybody really cutting back on wheat yet around here.

Corn yields around here have been from 220 bushels down to 190 bushels. The one field run on our farm is running around 190, which would be right at its APH.… Continue reading

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Henney moving from OABA to OVMA

The Ohio Veterinary Medical Association (OVMA) Board of Directors is pleased to announce the appointment of its next executive director, Christopher Henney. Chris brings 25 years of experience in association management, strategic planning, leadership development, and advocacy.

“Chris has a solid history of volunteer and staff development, program implementation, and policy development,” said Eric Gordon, OVMA president. “I am excited to welcome Chris to the OVMA and am confident he is the right leader to move our organization forward to an even brighter future.”

Founded in 1884, OVMA’s mission is to foster the core principles of stewardship, compassion, community, and lifelong learning in veterinary medicine. As a respected leader in organized veterinary medicine, OVMA is best known for hosting the Midwest Veterinary Conference, the fifth largest veterinary convention in North America.

“I am thrilled for the opportunity to serve the members of the Ohio Veterinary Medical Association and appreciate the board’s trust in my leadership of this well-respected organization.… Continue reading

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Harvest heating up across Ohio

Despite a round of midweek showers last week, harvest activity pushed ahead, according to Ben Torrance, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 6 percent very short, 46 percent short, and 48 percent adequate. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending on October 1 was 65.3 degrees, 5.3 degrees above normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 0.45 inches of precipitation, 0.28 inches below average. There were 5.5 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending October 1.

Farmers reported that last week’s rainfall slowed the corn and soybean harvest in western counties. Eighty-eight percent of corn was in or past dent, 51 percent was mature, and 4 percent was harvested. Corn for silage was 75 percent harvested. Eighty-three percent of soybeans were dropping leaves and 7 percent of soybeans were harvested. Corn and soybean condition were 74 and 70 percent good to excellent, respectively.… Continue reading

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USDA issuing $1.75 billion through emergency relief programs

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced that it will begin issuing more than $1.75 billion in emergency relief payments to eligible farmers and livestock producers. These much-needed payments are helping farming and ranching operations recover following natural disasters in 2020, 2021 and 2022. 

“USDA provides substantial economic support for America’s farmers and ranchers through its critical farm program payments. These payments are reflective of the incredible and cumulative financial hits brought on by devastating natural disasters that agricultural producers nationwide have endured while fulfilling their commitment to produce our food, fiber and fuel,” said Tom Vilsack, Agriculture Secretary. “This additional assistance helps offset the tremendous losses that these producers faced and is a valuable investment, not only for farmers and ranchers but in the economic successes of our communities — rural and urban —  and in our nation’s food security for generations to come.”   

Emergency Livestock Relief Program 

FSA will issue more than $581 million in 2021 and 2022 drought and wildfire emergency relief to eligible ranchers.   … Continue reading

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Disappointing export numbers continue

By Doug Tenney, Leist Mercantile

Our home is happily wearing a new roof. I chose to work from home on day one of the predicted two-day job. A scheduled zoom meeting was “perfectly” timed during the peak of the demolition phase. My ear buds spared me and allowed me to wander and watch a “well-oiled machine” of nine who amazingly completed the job and cleanup in one day! Professional, pleasant, and persistent, just like the combines, grain carts, trucks, and personnel we will be seeing soon in the fields!

Grains’ volume at the CBOT continues to be light compared to past years. Trade volume by grain end users as well as producers is still much below that of other traders in the market. One trend which has been observed numerous times throughout the summer took place with corn, soybean, and wheat price activity. Often within a week, prices were higher in the overnight trading when it takes a brief pause at 8:45 a.m.… Continue reading

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Crop maturity hastens as dry stretch continues

Crop maturity accelerated under last week’s warm and dry conditions, according to Ben Torrance, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 6 percent very short, 49 percent short, and 45 percent adequate. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending on September 24 was 63.4 degrees, 2.0 degrees above normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 0.09 inches of precipitation, 0.64 inches below average. There were 6.5 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending September 24.

Last week’s field activities included hay bailing, manure application, lime spreading, and drainage tile installation. Limited instances of tar spot fungus in corn stands were reported in west-central portions of the State. Seventyseven percent of corn was in or past dent, 40 percent was mature, and 2 percent was harvested. Corn for silage was 59 percent harvested. Fifty-two percent of soybeans were dropping leaves. Corn and soybean condition were 72 and 68 percent good to excellent, respectively.… Continue reading

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What makes a “good complete” mineral?

By Katie VanValin, Extension specialist, Department of Animal and Food Science, University of Kentucky

You’ve probably heard it a dozen times, “Make sure you put out a good complete mineral,” but what does this mean?

Like many aspects of beef production, one perfect recipe for a mineral that will meet the needs of all cattle throughout the year does not exist. A good mineral is a product that can provide supplemental minerals in a form and source that allow cattle to consume enough minerals to prevent deficiencies. Unfortunately, not every mineral product on the shelves at the local farm store will meet this definition. Here are a few considerations when looking for a “good” mineral.

The first thing to consider is the form of mineral you are looking for. The form typically refers to how the mineral is delivered to the cattle and includes blocks, loose free-choice minerals, loose minerals for mixing in feed, or injectables.… Continue reading

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Molecular herbicide resistance testing is bad news for weeds

By Carol Brown, Soybean Research Information Network

The main method for getting rid of weeds in a crop field is fairly simple: spray them with a herbicide. But some weeds are resistant to herbicides. Knowing which ones are resistant ahead of time could save farmers time and money by not applying a herbicide that isn’t going to work.

Michigan State University weed geneticist Eric Patterson is working to identify herbicide-resistant weeds faster. He led a research project with Michigan soybean checkoff support to detect resistance earlier through molecular diagnosis.

“The current process for farmers to find out if weeds are herbicide resistant is to send seeds from weeds that survived herbicide applications to a weed diagnostics clinic. At MSU, Erin Hill is one of the few dedicated weed diagnosticians in the country,” Patterson explains. “When she receives weed seeds in the fall, she grows the plants and conducts a ‘dose response’ assay.… Continue reading

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FSR welcomes new crop of exhibitors, recognizes supporters

More than 50 companies will join the ranks as exhibitors for the 61st Farm Science Review Sept. 19-21 at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center. The new exhibitors represent various sectors in the agriculture industry including livestock handling, equipment advancements, agronomic technology, agricultural policy and more.

“We are witnessing a new wave of technology in agriculture and are looking forward to the advancements our new exhibitors are bringing to the show,” said Nick Zachrich, Farm Science Review manager. “We continue to be a farm show that has something for everybody and that is thanks to the number of exhibitors that show up year-after-year.” 

A few of the new exhibitors joining the line-up at this year’s show include: 

  • Holganix (Booth #554) — Holganix has two unique products for the agricultural market: Bio 800 Agriculture and Bio 800 Breakdown. Holganix Bio 800+ products harness the power of over 800 species of soil microbes to build soil health, increase yield, reduce fertilizer and increase the breakdown of crop residue. 
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Hot, dry weather dried topsoil

Last week’s warm days and mostly fair weather supported crop progress but left some counties excessively dry, according to Ben Torrance, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 9 percent very short, 19% short, 68% adequate, and 4% surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending on Sept. 10 was 72.5 degrees, 4.6 degrees above normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 0.27 inches of precipitation, 0.27 inches below average. There were 5.6 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending Sept. 10.

Some reporters in southwestern counties continued to describe excessive soil dryness, with last week’s field observations indicating evidence of crop stress as corn and soybean stands entered maturation. Ninety-five percent of corn was in or past dough, 53% was in or past dent, and 11% was mature. Corn for silage was 27% harvested. Eight percent of soybeans were dropping leaves. Corn and soybean condition were 82 and 75% good to excellent, respectively.… Continue reading

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Late disease issues may ding yields

Jeff Magyar

We’re too dry again. Some of the beans in the area are losing all their leaves. I don’t think there’ll be any September run beans, but some guys that planted 2.2s and 2.1s have plants that are losing leaves. They aren’t 50- to 60- bushel beans looking at them as the leaves come off. We had miserable heat and the plants just gave up. Plants that were showing no signs of changing just started yellowing everywhere in the fields after last week’s heat. The beans that were stressed from too much moisture earlier never bounced back. They’ve giving up. They’ve had enough.

White mold is terrible in some areas. I would say 25% to 30% of the soybean acres around here show a sign of white mold just driving by at 50 miles an hour. In other years, I have seen 70-bushel beans in one field and then you get a section that has bad white mold and yields go to 25.… Continue reading

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Highly functioning healthy soils

By Dusty Sonnenberg, CCA, Field Leader, a project of the Ohio Soybean Council and Soybean Check-off

In his years studying soils, Adam Daugherty, NRCS District Conservationist, Coffee County Tennessee, has come to the conclusion that soils have latent potential just waiting to be developed and manifest. “We don’t just want to conserve our soils when we can restore and help improve them,” said Daugherty. “The rejuvenation of your soil does not start with the implementation of principles, but rather the commitment to understanding ecological functions. You need to know why before how. The ingredients include the sun, soil, plants, and you.”

Daugherty believes that while no-till production is a good step, the implementation of no-till practices alone will not rejuvenate the soil. “Biologically, no-till was bacteria dominated. That biology is presently out of balance, and in many places the overall ecosystem functions are low,” said Daugherty. “Minus a lot of erosion and a little diesel, no-till production has mirrored conventional tillage.… Continue reading

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